Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Third recitation section

Now at that time the venerable Upananda, the son of the Sakyans, having occupied a lodging in Sāvatthī, went away to some village residence and occupied a lodging there too. Then it occurred to these monks: “Now your reverences, this venerable Upananda, the son of the Sakyans, is a maker of strife, a maker of quarrels, a maker of contention, a maker of disputes, a maker of legal questions in the Order. If he will spend the rains here, not one of us can live in comfort. Come, let us ask him.” Then these monks spoke thus to the venerable Upananda, the son of the Sakyans: “Have you not, reverend Upananda, occupied a lodging in Sāvatthī?”

“Yes, your reverences.”

“But do you, reverend Upananda, (although) alone reserve two (lodgings)?”

“I, your reverences, am giving up the one here and occupying the one there.” Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can the venerable Upananda, the son of the Sakyans, BD.5.236 (although) alone reserve two (lodgings)?” They told this matter to the Lord. Then the Lord on this occasion, in this connection, having had the Order of monks convened, questioned the venerable Upananda, the son of the Sakyans, saying:

“Is it true, as is said, that you, Upananda … (lodgings)?”

“It is true, Lord.” The Awakened One, the Lord, rebuked him, saying:

“How can you, foolish man, (although) alone reserve two (lodgings)? The one occupied by you there, foolish man, is lost here,[1] the one occupied by you here is lost there. Thus are you, foolish man, excluded from both. It is not, foolish man, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased …” … having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

Monks, two (lodgings) should not be reserved by one (monk). Whoever should reserve (them), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.16.13.1 Now at that time the Lord[2] in many a figure talked a talk on discipline to the monks, he spoke in praise of discipline, he spoke in praise of accomplishment in discipline, he spoke in praise of the venerable Upāli, referring (to him) again and again. Monks spoke thus: “The Lord in many a figure talked a talk on discipline … he spoke in praise of the venerable Upāli, referring (to him) again and again. Come, your reverences, let us master discipline under the venerable Upāli,” and they, many monks—elders and newly ordained and those of middle standing—mastered discipline under the venerable Upāli. The venerable Upāli, out of respect for the monks who were elders, recited standing, and also the monks who were elders, out of respect for dhamma,[3] had it recited standing, so that the monks who were elders were tired as well as the venerable Upāli. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, Vin.2.169 when a newly ordained monk is reciting to sit down on a seat that is the same (height) or on a higher one out of respect for dhamma; when a monk who is an elder BD.5.237 is having it recited to sit down on a seat that is the same (height) or on a lower one out of respect for dhamma.


Kd.16.13.2 Now at that time many monks standing near the venerable Upāli grew tired waiting for the recitation. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to sit down with those entitled to seats of an equal (height).” Then it occurred to monks: “Now, in respect of what is one entitled to seats of an equal (height)?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to sit down together with those who are within three years (of your) standing.[4]


Now at that time several monks entitled to seats of an equal (height), having sat down on a couch, broke the couch; having sat down on a chair, they broke the chair. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow, monks, a couch for a group of three (persons),[5] a chair for a group of three (persons).” But a group of three (people), having sat down on a couch, broke the couch; having sat down on a chair, they broke the chair. “I allow, monks, a couch for a group of two (persons), a chair for a group of two (persons).


Now at that time monks were (too) scrupulous to sit down on a long seat with those not entitled to a seat of an equal (height). They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, except with a eunuch, a woman, a hermaphrodite, to sit down on a long seat with those not entitled to a seat of an equal (height).” Then it occurred to the monks: “Now, what is the maximum (length) of a ‘long seat’?”

I allow, monks, the maximum (length) of a ‘long seat’ (to be) whatever is the maximum (length) that suffices (to seat) three (persons).


Kd.16.14.1 Now at that time Visākhā, Migāra’s mother, wanted to have a long house with a verandah of the “elephant-nail” type[6] built for an Order. Then it occurred to the monks: “What appurtenances of a long house are allowed by the Lord, what are not allowed?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow, monks, all the appurtenances of a long house.


BD.5.238 Now at that time the grandmother of King Pasenadi of Kosala passed away.[7] On her passing many unallowable goods accrued to an Order, that is to say[8] a sofa, a divan … a cotton quilt … a couch with a red cushion at either end. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, having broken off[9] the legs of a sofa, Vin.2.170 to make use of it; having destroyed the horse-hair (stuffing) of a divan, to make use of it; having unravelled the cotton quilt, to make a squatting mat;[10] to make a ground covering with what is over.

Things not to be disposed of

Kd.16.15.1 Now at that time in a certain village residence not far from Sāvatthī the resident monks were worried at preparing lodgings for the incoming monks who arrived. Then it occurred to these monks: “At present we, your reverences, are worried at preparing lodgings for incoming monks who arrive. Come, your reverences, let us make over all the lodgings belonging to the Order to one (monk) and we will make use of them as belonging to him.” So these made over to one (monk) all the lodgings belonging to the Order. Incoming monks spoke thus to these monks: “Make ready lodgings, your reverences, for us.”

“Your reverences, there are no lodgings belonging to the Order, we have made them all over to one (monk).”

“But have you, your reverences, disposed of lodgings belonging to an Order?”

“Yes, your reverences.” Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can these monks dispose of what belongs to an Order?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

BD.5.239 “Is it true, as is said, monks, that monks disposed of lodgings belonging to an Order?”

“It is true, Lord.” The Awakened One, the Lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How, monks, can these foolish men dispose of lodgings belonging to an Order? It is not, monks, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased …” And having rebuked them, having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

Kd.16.15.2 “Monks, these five things not to be disposed of[11] should not be disposed of by an Order or by a group or by an individual—even if disposed of they are not (really) disposed of. Whoever should dispose of them, there is a grave offence. What are the five?

  1. A monastery, a site for a monastery. This is the first thing not to be disposed of that should not be disposed of by an Order or by a group or by an individual—even if disposed of it is not (really) disposed of. Whoever should dispose of it, there is a grave offence.
  2. A dwelling-place, a site for a dwelling-place. This is the second thing …
  3. A couch, a chair, a mattress, a squatting mat. This is the third thing …
  4. A copper pot, a copper box, a copper jar, a copper vessel, an adze, a hatchet, an axe, a hoe, a spade. This is the fourth thing …
  5. Jungle-rope, bamboo, coarse grass, reeds, tiṇa-grass, clay, wooden goods, clay goods. This is the fifth thing not to be disposed of that should not be disposed of by an Order or by a group or by an individual—even if disposed of it is not (really) disposed of. Whoever should dispose of it, there is a grave offence.

Monks, these five things not to be disposed of should not be disposed of by an Order or by a group or by an individual—even if disposed of they are not (really) disposed of. Whoever should dispose of them, there is a grave offence.”

Things not to be distributed

Kd.16.16.1 Then the Lord, having stayed at Sāvatthī for as long as he found suiting, Vin.2.171 set out on tour for Kiṭāgiri with a large Order of monks, with at least five hundred monks and with Sāriputta and Moggallāna. Then the monks who were BD.5.240 followers of Assaji and Punabbasuka heard: “They say that the Lord has arrived at Kiṭāgiri with a large Order of monks … and with Sāriputta and Moggallāna. Come, your reverences, let us distribute all the lodgings belonging to the Order. Sāriputta and Moggallāna are of depraved desires, they are under the influence of depraved desires; we will not make ready lodgings for them.” They distributed all the lodgings belonging to the Order. Then the Lord, walking on tour, gradually reached Kiṭāgiri. Then the Lord addressed several monks, saying:

“Do you go, monks, and having gone up to the monks who are followers of Assaji and Punabbasuka, speak thus: ‘The Lord, your reverences, has come together with a large Order of monks … and with Sāriputta and Moggallāna; so, your reverences, make ready lodgings for the Lord and for the Order of monks and for Sāriputta and Moggallāna’.”

“Very well, Lord,” and these monks, having answered the Lord in assent, went up to the monks who were followers of Assaji and Punabbasuka; having gone up to the monks who were followers of Assaji and Punabbasuka, they spoke thus: “The Lord, your reverences, has come … make ready lodgings for the Lord and for the Order of monks and for Sāriputta and Moggallāna.”

“There are no lodgings, your reverences, belonging to the Order; all were distributed by us. The Lord, your reverences, is welcome, the Lord can stay in whatever dwelling-place he likes. Sāriputta and Moggallāna are of depraved desires, they are under the influence of depraved desires; we will not make ready lodgings for them.”

Kd.16.16.2 “But did you, your reverences, distribute lodgings belonging to the Order?”

“Yes, your reverences.” Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can these monks who are followers of Assaji and Punabbasuka distribute lodgings belonging to an Order?” Then these monks told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Is it true, as is said, monks, that monks distributed … to an Order?”

“It is true, Lord.”

“How, monks, can these foolish men distribute lodgings BD.5.241 belonging to an Order? It is not, monks, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased …” Having rebuked them, having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

“Monks, these five things not to be divided up[12] should not be divided up by an Order or by a group or by an individual—even if divided up they are not (really) divided up. Whoever should divide them up, there is a grave offence. What are the five?[13]

  1. A monastery, a site for a monastery. This is the first thing not to be divided up that should not be divided up by an Order or by a group or by an individual—even if divided up it is not (really) divided up. Whoever should divide it up, there is a grave offence.
  2. A dwelling-place, a site for a dwelling-place. This is the second thing …
  3. A couch, a chair, a mattress, a squatting mat. This is the third thing …
  4. A copper pot, a copper box, a copper jar, a copper vessel, an adze, a hatchet, an axe, a hoe, a spade. This is the fourth thing …
  5. Jungle-rope, bamboo, coarse grass, reeds, tiṇa-grass, clay, wooden goods, clay goods. This is the fifth thing not to be divided up that should not be divided up by an Order or by a group or by an individual—even if divided up it is not (really) divided up. Whoever should divide it up, there is a grave offence.
  6. Vin.2.172

On the gift of building work

Kd.16.17.1 Then the Lord, having stayed at Kiṭāgiri for as long as he found suiting, set out on tour for Āḷavī. Gradually, walking on tour, he arrived at Āḷavī. The Lord stayed there at Āḷavī at the chief shrine of Āḷavī.[14] Now at that time the monks of Āḷavī gave repairs such as these into the charge (of a monk):[15] they gave repairs in charge when there was merely putting aside in heaps[16] … when there was merely smearing a wall … when there was merely placing a door … when there was merely making a socket for a bolt … when there was merely making a window-hole … when there was merely treating with whitewash … when there was merely treating with black colouring … when there was merely treating with red chalk … when there was merely roofing … when there was merely joining … when there was merely putting on a bar (to a doorpost)[17] … when there was merely restoring broken and dilapidated parts[18] … when there was merely plastering the floors;[19] and they gave repairs in charge for twenty years, and they gave repairs in charge for thirty years, and they gave repairs in charge for life, and they gave the repairs to a completed dwelling-place into the charge (of a monk until) the time of his cremation.[20]

BD.5.242 Those who were modest monks spread it about, saying: “How can the monks of Āḷavī give repairs such as these into the charge (of a monk) … (until) the time of his cremation?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Is it true, as is said, monks, that the monks of Āḷavī … the time of his cremation?”

“It is true, Lord.” Having rebuked them, having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

Monks, repairs when there is merely putting aside in heaps should not be given into the charge (of a monk) … nor should repairs to a completed dwelling-place be given into the charge (of a monk) until the time of his cremation. Whoever should (so) give in charge, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow you, monks, to give repairs to a dwelling-place into the charge (of a monk) if it is not (yet) built or if it is not (yet) finished;[21] in reference to work on a small dwelling-place, repairs may be given in charge for six or five years; in reference to work on a curved house repairs may be given in charge for seven or eight years; in reference to work on a large dwelling-place or a long house, repairs may be given in charge for ten or twelve years.


Kd.16.17.2 Now at that time monks gave the whole of a dwelling-place into charge for repairs. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, the whole of a dwelling-place should not be given in charge for repairs. Whoever should give one in charge, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


“Now at that time monks gave two (dwelling-places) into the charge of one (monk). They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, two (dwelling-places) should not be given into the charge of one (monk). Whoever should (so) give in charge, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time monks, having taken on repairs, made another live (there). They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, Vin.2.173 having taken on repairs, you should not make another live (there). Whoever should make (another) live (there), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time monks, having taken on repairs, reserved BD.5.243 (for their own use) what belonged to an Order. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, having taken on repairs, you should not reserve (for your own use) what belongs to an Order. Whoever should (so) reserve it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow you, monks, to occupy one good sleeping place.


Now at that time monks gave repairs into the charge of one outside a boundary. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, repairs should not be given into the charge of one outside a boundary. Whoever should (so) give them in charge, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time monks, having taken on repairs (to a building), reserved it for all time. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, having taken on repairs (to a building), you should not reserve it for all time. Whoever should (so) reserve it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow you, monks, to reserve it for the three months of the rains, but not to reserve it for the dry season.[22]


Kd.16.17.3 Now at that time monks, having taken on repairs, went away[23] and left the Order and passed away, and they pretended to be novices and they pretended to be disavowers of the training … to be committers of extreme offences … to be mad … to be unhinged … to have bodily pains … to be suspended for not seeing an offence … to be suspended for not making amends for an offence … to be suspended for not giving up a wrong view and they pretended to be eunuchs … to be living in communion as it were by theft … to have gone over to a sect … to be animals … to be matricides … to be parricides … to be slayers of one perfected … to be seducers of nuns … to be schismatics … to be shedders of a (Truth-finder’s) blood and they pretended to be hermaphrodites. They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, having taken on repairs, goes away. Thinking, ‘Do not let the Order suffer,’ (the repairs) should be given into the charge of another. This is a case, monks, where a monk, having taken on repairs, BD.5.244 leaves the Order, passes away, pretends to be … a hermaphrodite. Thinking, ‘Do not let the Order suffer,’ (the repairs) should be given into the charge of another. This is a case, monks, where a monk, having taken on repairs, goes away while they are yet unfinished … pretends to be a hermaphrodite. Thinking, ‘Do not let the Order suffer,’ (the repairs) should be given into the charge of another. This is a case, monks, where a monk, having taken on repairs, on their completion goes away; they are still in his (charge).[24] This is a case, monks, where a monk, having taken on repairs, on their completion leaves the Order … pretends to have committed an extreme offence: the Order is the owner. This is a case, monks, where a monk, having taken on repairs, on their completion pretends to be mad … Vin.2.174 pretends to be suspended for not giving up a wrong view: they are still in his (charge). This is a case, monks, where a monk, having taken on repairs, on their completion pretends to be a eunuch … pretends to be a hermaphrodite: the Order is the owner.”

Rejection of using elsewhere, etc.

Kd.16.18.1 Now at that time monks made use elsewhere[25] of lodgings—appurtenances of a dwelling-place—belonging to a lay-follower. Then that lay-follower … spread it about, saying: “How can these revered sirs make use elsewhere of appurtenances belonging somewhere else?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, you should not make use elsewhere of appurtenances belonging somewhere else. Whoever should (so) make use of them, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time monks,[26] being (too) scrupulous to convey to the Observance house and to the meeting place (things to sit on), sat down on the ground. Their limbs and robes were covered with dust. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to convey (things) temporarily.


Now at that time a great dwelling-place belonging to an Order fell into decay. Monks, being scrupulous, did not take out the lodgings.[27] They told this matter to the Lord. He BD.5.245 said: “I allow you, monks, to convey (things) for the sake of protecting (them).


Kd.16.19.1 Now at that time a costly woollen blanket—an accessory to a lodging—accrued to an Order. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to barter[28] it for (something) advantageous.” Now at that time a costly woven cloth … “to barter it for (something) advantageous.


Now at that time a bear’s hide[29] accrued to an Order. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to make a towel for the feet.” Drapery[30] accrued. “I allow you, monks, to make a towel for the feet.” Cloth[31] accrued. “I allow you, monks, to make a towel for the feet.


Kd.16.20.1 Now at that time monks trod upon a lodging while their feet were unwashed;[32] the lodging was soiled. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, a lodging should not be trodden upon while your feet are unwashed. Whoever should (so) tread upon one, there is an offence of wrong-doing.” Now at that time monks trod upon a lodging while their feet were damp … Vin.2.175 … with their sandals on … “… offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.16.20.2 Now at that time monks spat on ground that had been treated;[33] the colour was spoiled. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, you should not spit upon ground that has been treated. Whoever should (so) spit, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow you, monks, a spittoon.” Now at that time the legs of couches and the legs of chairs scratched ground that had been treated. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to wrap them round with a piece of cloth.


BD.5.246 Now at that time monks leant against a wall that had been treated; the colour was spoiled. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, you should not lean against a wall that has been treated. Whoever should lean against one, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow you, monks, a reclining board.[34] The reclining board scratched the ground underneath, it destroyed the wall above. “I allow you, monks, to wrap it round with a piece of cloth at the lower and the upper (ends).


Now at that time monks[35] were (too) scrupulous to lie down on a place for treading on with washed feet.[36] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to lie down (in such a place), having spread a sheet.[37]

Allowance for meals for the Order, etc.

Kd.16.21.1 Then the Lord, having stayed at Āḷavī for as long as he found suiting, set out on tour for Rājagaha. Gradually, walking on tour, he arrived at Rājagaha. The Lord stayed there at Rājagaha in the Great Grove at the squirrels’ feeding place. Now at that time Rājagaha was short of food. People were not able to make a meal for the Order (but) they wanted to make a meal for special (monks),[38] an invitation (-meal),[39] food (allowed by) ticket,[40] (food given) on a day of the waxing or waning of the moon, (given) on an Observance day, (given) on the day after an Observance day. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, a meal for an Order, a meal for a special (monk), an invitation (meal) … (food given) on the day after an Observance day.[41]

Agreement for an issuer of meals

Now at that time the group of six monks, having chosen the sweet foods for themselves, gave poor foods to (other) monks. They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

I allow you, monks, to agree upon a monk possessed of BD.5.247 five qualities as issuer of meals:[42] Vin.2.176 one who would not follow a wrong course from desire … from hatred … from stupidity … from fear, and one who would know what is issued and what is not issued. And thus, monks, should he be agreed upon: First, a monk should be asked …[43]… Thus do I understand this’.”

Then it occurred to the monks who were issuers of meals: “Now, how should a meal be issued?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to issue (the food) after having put it into heaps and having tied on a ticket or a leaf.[44]

Agreement for an assigner of lodgings

Kd.16.21.2 Now at that time there was no assigner of lodgings[45] for an Order.[46] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to agree upon a monk endowed with five qualities as assigner of lodgings … and one who would know what is assigned and what is not assigned. And thus, monks, should he be agreed upon …[47]… Thus do I understand this’.


Now at that time there was no keeper of the storeroom[48] for an Order. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, … and one who would, know what is guarded and what is not guarded. And thus, monks, should he be agreed upon … ‘… Thus do I understand this’.”


Now at that time there was no accepter of robes[49] for an Order. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow … and one who would know what is taken and what is not taken … ‘… Thus do I understand this’.”


Now at that time there was no distributor of robe material[50] … no distributor of conjey[51] … no distributor of fruit for an Order. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks … and one who would know what BD.5.248 is distributed and what is not distributed … ‘… Thus do I understand this’.”


Now at that time there was no distributor of solid food[52] for an Order. The solid food, not being distributed, was lost. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you … and one who would know what is distributed and what is not distributed … ‘… Thus do I understand this’.”

Agreement on one to dispose of trifles

Kd.16.21.3 Now at that time trifling accessories had accrued in the storeroom of an Order. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to agree upon a monk endowed with five qualities Vin.2.177 as disposer of trifles:[53]… one who would know what is disposed of and what is not disposed of … ‘… Thus do I understand this.’ Each needle is to be given by the monk who is the disposer of trifles, pairs of scissors are to be given, sandals are to be given, waistbands … shoulder straps … strainers … regulation water pots[54] … cross-seams[55] … short cross-seams[56] … circular seams[57] … short circular seams[58] … braiding[59] … binding[60] is to be given. If there comes to be ghee or oil or honey or molasses for an Order, it may be given to be partaken of at once;[61] if there is need for it yet again, it may be given yet again; if there is need for it yet again, it may be given yet again.”

Agreement on an accepter of outer cloaks

Now at that time there was no accepter of outer cloaks[62] … accepter of bowls[63] for an Order. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to agree upon … one who would know what is taken and what is not taken. And thus, monks, … ‘… Thus do I understand this..”


Now at that time an Order had no superintendent of monastery attendants. The monastery attendants, not being superintended, did not do the work (properly). They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to agree upon a superintendent of monastery attendants … BD.5.249 and one who knows what is superintended and what is not superintended … ‘… Thus do I understand this..”


Now at that time an Order had no superintendent for the novices. The novices, not being superintended, did not do the work (properly) … ‘… Thus do I understand this..”

The Sixth Section: that on Lodgings.

This is its key:

At that time a dwelling-place had not been permitted by the best of Awakened Ones;
these, disciples of the Conqueror went out from this and that place—(their) habitation.[64] /
A merchant householder, having seen them, said this to the monks:
“If I were to have (dwelling-places) built, would you stay (in them)?” They asked the Leader. /
Dwelling-place, curved house, and long house, mansion, cave,
he allowed five (kinds of) abodes. The merchant had dwelling-places built. /
People had a dwelling-place built doorless, unclosed,
door, doorpost and lintel, hollow like a mortar and so on, /
Hole and cord for pulling through, post for a bolt, and “monkey’s head,” Vin.2.178
a pin, a stick, a key of copper, wood, horn, /
And just a bolt and a pin, roofing smeared inside and out,
railing, lattice and stick, cloth and about matting, /
Solid bench, and couch of split bamboo, bierlike long couch,
with slats, and curved legs, removeable, rectangular, tall ones, /
And three-sided, plaited chair, cloth chair, sheep-footed,
emblic myrobalan,[65] wooden,[66] stool, and just a straw chair, /
One a high one,[67] and a snake,[68] supports,[69] and supports of eight finger-breadths,
BD.5.250 thread, squares, cotton cloth, cotton quilt, half (the size of a man’s) body, /
Festival and also mattresses, woven cloth, and also lodgings,
covered, it fell from below, and having removed they carried away, /
And line, and the Truth-finder[70] allowed the outline of the hand,
and also other sects in a dwelling-place,[71] grain-husk, and soft clay, /
What exudes from trees, a spoon, a wall, mustard powder (and) oil of beeswax,
to sponge over the thick (places), rough, clay (and the excrement of) earthworms,[72] /
What exudes from trees, and a bold design, low, and a piling, they ascended,
they fell off, thronged, half-wall, again three, /
In a small (one), and a buttress,[73] let in the rain, cry of distress,[74] peg,
and bamboo and cord for robes, verandah, and about a screen, /
Balustrade, powdered grass—the method should be done in the way below,[75]
in the open air, became tepid, hall, and as below, vessel, /
Dwelling-place, and just a porch, little hall for a fire in a cell,
monasteries, porches again, the method should be done just (as) below. /
Plaster,[76] and faithful Anāthapiṇḍika went to the Cool Grove,
things seen, he invited the Leader with the Order. /
He enjoined on the way, a group built a monastery,
repairs at Vesālī, in front of and taking possession of, /
Who is worthy of the best food? and the partridge, not to be greeted,
taken possession of, inside a house, cotton, he visited Sāvatthī, /
He prepared a monastery, and an uproar in a refectory,
ill, and a good sleeping place, pretexts, the seventeen there, /
BD.5.251 “Now, by whom?” “Now, how?” he distributed according to the accommodation in the dwelling-places,
and in cells, an additional share, shares need not be given if one is not willing, /
Outside a boundary, and for all time, three (times for) assignment of lodgings,
and Upananda, he praised, standing, equal seats, /
Those entitled to seats of an equal (height) broke them, groups of three (and) for a group of two,[77]
a long (seat) for those not entitled to seats of an equal (height), to make use of a verandah,[78] /
Grandmother,[79] and not far, and distributed, Kiṭāgiri, Vin.2.179
Āḷavī: in heaps, on walls, door, socket, /
And window-hole, whitewash, black colouring, red chalk, roofing, joining,
bar, broken (parts), doing up, twenty, thirty and for life, /
Completed, not built, incomplete,[80] for six or five years if it is a small one,
and seven or eight if it is a curved house, ten and twelve for a large one, /
A whole dwelling-place, of one, they made another live (there), what belongs to an Order,
outside a boundary, and for all time, he goes away, and they leave the Order, /
And passed away, and (pretended to be) a novice, disavowers of the training, extreme,
mad, and unhinged, pains, not seeing an offence, /
Not making amends for, wrong view, eunuchs, as it were by theft, other sects,
animals, (slayers) of mother, of father, and of one perfected, seducers, /
Schismatics, shedders of (a Truth-finder’s) blood, and then hermaphrodites,
BD.5.252 “Do not let the Order suffer”—the work should be given to another, /
And when (yet) unfinished to another; if he goes away when it is built it is still in his (charge);
if he leaves the Order, passes away, and pretends to be a novice, /
And disavows the training, (pretends to have committed an) extreme (offence and to be) a eunuch,
the Order itself becomes the owner; if he is mad, unhinged, in pain, /
(Suspended for) not seeing, for not making amends for, (for not giving up) a wrong view—they are still in his (charge);
Eunuch, and as it were by theft, member of another sect, animal, matricide, parricide,
Slayer of one perfected, and then a seducer, schismatic, shedder of (a Truth-finder’s) blood, hermaphrodite—
if he pretends thus, the Order itself becomes the owner. /
They conveyed, elsewhere, scrupulous, and fell into decay, woollen blanket,
and woven cloths, hide, drapery, a cloth, and they trod upon, /
Damp, sandals, should not spit, they scratched,[81] and they leant against,
reclining board, even then it scratched,[82] about spreading where washed,[83] /
They were unable to in Rājagaha, poor, issuer of meals,
“Now, how?” assigner, agreement upon a storeroom keeper, /
And then accepter, distributor, and conjey, distributor of fruit,
and even a distributor of solid food, disposer of trifles, /
And even an accepter of outer cloaks, likewise an accepter of bowls,
and agreement upon a superintendent of monastery attendantsand of novices. /
The Leader who has overcome all, knower of the worlds, his mind benevolent,
(is one) to meditate upon and have insight into the need for abodes and ease. Vin.2.180

Footnotes and references:

1.

The one taken in each place is automatically lost just because a monk has taken them both.

2.

The two introductory sentences occur also at Vin.4.142 (BD.3.40).

3.

Cf. Bu-Sk.57Bu-Sk.72 and especially Bu-Sk.69.

4.

I.e. since the time of ordination.

5.

tivagga, threefold.

6.

hatthinakhaka. See A.K. Coomaraswamy, Indian Architectural Terms, Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 48, No. 3, p.258.

7.

Cf. SN.i.97.

8.

List as at Kd.5.10.4; Kd.16.8.

9.

Cf. Nuns’ Bi-Pc.42, where a nun may use a sofa and a divan if she cuts down, chinditvā, the legs of the former and cuts out, chinditvā, the stuffing from the latter. Above bhinditvā occurs in both places instead of chinditvā. See BD.3.326, n.1; BD.3.327, n.3. DN-a.88, quoting above passage, uses both words: āsandiya pāde chinditvāpallaṅkassa vāḷe bhinditvā. At Kd.5.10.5 it is a dukkaṭa for a monk to use a sofa, divan or cotton quilt. At Kd.16.8 they form the three exceptions to the things displayed by a householder that a monk may sit down on. Above they are allowed if certain conditions are fulfilled.

10.

Similar allowance at Kd.16.2.6.

11.

avissajjiyāni. Cf. avissajjikaṃ at Kd.8.27.5; and appamattakavissajjaka at Vin.2.177, Vin.4.38.

12.

avebhaṅgiyāni. Cf. avebhaṅgikaṃ at Kd.8.27.5.

13.

As at Kd.16.15.2.

15.

Cf. the giving in charge of repairs in a general way at Kd.16.5.

16.

Vinaya Texts iii.213 takes this to refer to “clay or earth.”

17.

Oldenberg’s text reads gaṇḍikādhānamattena; Vin-a.1245 reads bhaṇḍika-. At Ja.iii.41 bhaṇḍikā is variant reading for gaṇḍikā. See Vinaya Texts iii.213, n.4

18.

As at Kd.16.5.2.

19.

paribhaṇḍa. Vin-a.1245 says doing up a “floor” with cowdung, with an astringent decoction. Cf. Kd.15.9.4.

20.

dhūmakālika, smoke-time, i.e. when the smoke arises from his funeral pyre. Cf. Ja.iii.422. Word occurs at Kd.21.1.9.

21.

According to Vin-a.1245–6, if the rafters have not been put up, for when they are up much has been built.

22.

Cf. Kd.16.11.3 above.

24.

tass’ eva taṃ. Vin-a.1248 elaborates “for the rains.”

25.

As at Vin.3.65Vin.3.66. Cf. Vin.4.76, Vin.4.81 (both “eating elsewhere”).

26.

As at Vin.3.66.

27.

Vin-a.1248 explains that having conveyed them elsewhere they do not make use of them.

28.

parivatteti. Cf. BD.2.55, n.8. Vin-a.1248 says that the meaning is to get a lodging, couch or chair of equal or greater value.

29.

At Vin.1.192 this is not included among the large hides which were not allowed.

30.

cakkalī. Cf. Kd.16.2.2.

31.

colaka. Cf. Kd.8.18.

32.

Cf. Kd.5.6.1 where monks are allowed to wear sandals so as not to soil couches and chairs when they get up on to them.

33.

Either with whitewash, black colouring or red chalk; cf. Kd.15.11.6; Kd.16.8.1; Kd.16.17.1. Kd.1.25.15 makes it appear as if black were for the ground and red for the walls.

34.

Mentioned at Kd.1.25.15, Kd.1.25.16.

35.

Omitted in Oldenberg’s text.

36.

dhotapādakā. Vin-a.1249 gives the above meaning, and says that dhotapādake is also a reading.

37.

paccattharitvā. On “sheet,” paccattharaṇa, see BD.2.34, n.1; BD.2.46, n.3.

39.

Defined at Vin.4.100.

40.

For this and the next three see notes at BD.2.313–314.

41.

Vin-a.1250 says that this allowance was made by the Lord for times of plenty when people can again give food to a whole Order.

42.

Dabba was agreed upon for this office at Kd.14.4 above, and at Bu-Ss.8 (Vin.3.158 = Vin.2.75). See also AN.iii.275.

43.

As in Kd.14.9

44.

paṭṭikā. Buddhaghosa, reading pattikā, says it is a leaf (paṇṇa) of a bamboo, reed or palm.

45.

This office was also given to Dabba.

46.

The following list of offices also occurs at AN.iii.274AN.iii.275.

47.

As in Kd.14.4.3.

48.

bhaṇḍāgārika, as at Vin.1.284.

49.

cīvarapaṭiggāhaka, as at Vin.1.283.

50.

cīvarabhājaka, as at Vin.1.285.

51.

Mentioned at Vin.4.38, Vin.4.155.

52.

Mentioned at Vin.4.38, Vin.4.155.

53.

Mentioned at Kd.15.13.1.

54.

Mentioned at Kd.15.13.1.

55.

See Kd.8.12.2.

56.

See Kd.8.12.2.

57.

See Kd.8.12.2.

58.

See Kd.8.12.2.

61.

Cf. Bu-NP.23 and Kd.6.15.10, when these things—medicines—may not be stored for more than seven days.

62.

sāṭiyagāhāpaka.

64.

Text reads āvāsā tamhā te; Sinhalese and Siamese editions. vāsā te. Oldenberg, Vin.2.323 says “the meter is quite correct if we expunge tamhā te.”

65.

Siamese edition, which I follow, reads āmalakā phalakā. Vin.2.323 suggests āmalaka-phalakā. Text reads āmaṭāmalaka; Sinhalese edition āmalāmalakā.

66.

Siamese edition, which I follow, reads āmalakā phalakā. Vin.2.323 suggests āmalaka-phalakā. Text reads āmaṭāmalaka; Sinhalese edition āmalāmalakā.

67.

Reading ucce ca ahi with Sinhalese and Siamese editions, instead of Text’s uccā hi.

68.

Reading ucce ca ahi with Sinhalese and Siamese editions, instead of Text’s uccā hi.

69.

I suggest pādakā, instead of Text’s atipādakā and Sinhalese and Siamese editions. pādāni, legs.

70.

Siamese edition omits tathāgata and reads instead titthiyā setakāḷavihāre cāpi. Sinhalese edition has tathāgato but not titthiyā, reading tathāgato setakālavihāre pi.

71.

Siamese edition omits tathāgata and reads instead titthiyā setakāḷavihāre cāpi. Sinhalese edition has tathāgato but not titthiyā, reading tathāgato setakālavihāre pi.

72.

Siamese edition reads laṇḍumattikam, Sinhalese laṇḍa-.

73.

Here kuḍḍapāda.

74.

Reading vissaraṃ with Siamese edition instead of saraṃ.

75.

See e.g. “key” to Kd.15 (towards end of Vin.2.143 and again towards top of BD.5.144).

76.

This should read sudha as in Kd.16.3.11 above, and as in Siamese edition, and as suggested at Vin.2.323, and not suddha.

77.

Reading with Sinhalese edition ca duvaggikaṃ, as surmised would be right at Vin.2.323, instead of text’s catuvaggikaṃ. Siamese reads ca duvaggikā.

78.

Sinhalese and Siamese editions. ālindaṃ paribhuñjituṃ, as for Kd.16.14, instead of text’s taṃ dvinnaṃ, paribhuñjisu.

79.

Sinhalese ayyakā ca, as surmised would be right at Vin.2.323. Siamese ayyikā ca; text ayyā ca.

80.

There is no sabbaṃ, whole, in the context to which this refers (i.e. Kd.16.17.1). Should read vippaṃ as does Siamese (for vippakataṃ).

81.

Sinhalese and Siamese Likhanti; text khīlanti; Kd.16.20.2 vilikhanti.

82.

Siamese likhat’ eva; Sinhalese likhaṇ evā; text khalite vā; Kd.16.20.2 vilikhati.

83.

Referring to the dhotapādaka at Kd.16.20.2.