Sambuka, Śambūka, Shambuka, Śambuka, Śāmbuka, Śāmbūka: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Sambuka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śambūka and Śambuka and Śāmbuka and Śāmbūka can be transliterated into English as Sambuka or Shambuka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume I

Śambūka (शम्बूक)—Sanskrit word for an animal “conch” (a bivalve shell, any shell or conch). This animal is from the group called Kośastha (conchiferous: ‘those which have a shell’). Kośastha itself is a sub-group of the group of animals known as Ānupa (those that frequent marshy places).

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Śambūka (शम्बूक).—A Śūdra muni. During the reign of Śrī Rāma a great number of children died in the country and many parents wept before the king about the loss of their offsprings. According to Vasiṣṭha’s advice Rāma enquired whether anybody indulged in actions not proper to his station in life. Śrī Rāma surveyed the country from the air in a Vimāna, and during the survey he found Śambūka, the śūdra muni hanging with his head down and inhaling smoke from a fire lit under him. Thus, having found out that the tapas by that śūdra was the reason for the children’s death, Rāma killed Śambūka immediately. (Kamba Rāmāyaṇa, Uttarakāṇḍa).

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Śambūka (शम्बूक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.44.71) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Śambūka) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Śambūka (sanskrit word) can mean any of the following:

1) a bivalve shell, any shell or conch

2) a snail

3) a kind of animal (= ghoṅgha)

4) the edge of the frontal protuberance of an elephant

5) Name of a Śūdra (who had become a devotee and was slain by Rāma-candra)

6) Name of a Daitya.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Shambuka is, in Hindu mythology, a character in some versions of the Ramayana. According to that version, Shambuka, a shudra ascetic, was slain by Rama for attempting to perform penance in violation of dharma, the bad karma resulting from which caused the death of a Brahmin's son. It is believed that Shambuka was beheaded in a hill at Ramtek, near Nagpur in Maharashtra.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (S) next»] — Sambuka in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sambuka : (m.) an oyster; a shell.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Sambuka, (cp. Sk. śambuka) a shell D. I, 84=A. I, 9; III, 395 (sippi°); J. II, 100. (Page 693)

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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śambuka (शम्बुक).—A bivalve shell.

Derivable forms: śambukaḥ (शम्बुकः).

See also (synonyms): śambu, śambukka.

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Śambūka (शम्बूक).—[śamb-ūkaḥ Uṇ.4.43]

1) A bivalve shell (śambūkā also in this sense).

2) A small conch-shell.

3) A snail.

4) The edge of the frontal protuberance of an elephant.

5) Name of a Śūdra (who practised penance though forbidden to his caste and was in consequence slain by Rāma; see inter alia U.2 and R.15).

Derivable forms: śambūkaḥ (शम्बूकः).

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Śāmbuka (शाम्बुक) or Śāmbūka (शाम्बूक).—A bivalve-shell.

Derivable forms: śāmbukaḥ (शाम्बुकः), śāmbūkaḥ (शाम्बूकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śambuka (शम्बुक).—m.

(-kaḥ) A bivalve-shell: see śambūka .

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Śambūka (शम्बूक).—mf.

(-kaḥ-kā) A bivalve-shell. m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A conch-shell. 2. A snail. 3. A Sudra, who had become a devotee in the time of Ramachandra, and was slain by him. 4. The edge of the frontal protuberance of the elephant. 5. The name of a Daitya. E. śam to be tranquil, ūkan aff. and vuk augment; also with the vowel short, śambuka, and the final consonant then rejected, śambu; it is also read, śambukka and with the first vowel long, śāmbūka, &c.

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Śāmbuka (शाम्बुक).—m.

(-kaḥ) A bivalve-shell. E. aṇ pleonasm added to śambu; also read śāmbūka, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śambūka (शम्बूक).— (borrowed from ), I. m. (and f. ), A bivalve shell. Ii. m. 1. A conch-shell. 2. A snail. 3. The edge of the frontal protuberance of an elephant. 4. The name of a Daitya. 5. A proper name, [Uttara Rāmacarita, 2. ed. Calc., 1862.] 42, 1.

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Śāmbūka (शाम्बूक).—śāmbūka = śambūka, q. cf.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śambūka (शम्बूक).—[masculine] conch-shell, snail, a cert. animal.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Śambuka (शम्बुक) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—poet. [Subhāshitāvali by Vallabhadeva]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śambuka (शम्बुक):—[from śambu] m. (cf. below and śāmbuka) a bivalve shell, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] a [particular] noxious insect, [Suśruta]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of a Śūdra, [Mahābhārata] ([Bombay edition] jambuka), [Raghuvaṃśa] ([varia lectio] kañcuka)

4) [v.s. ...] of a poet, [Subhāṣitāvali]

5) Śambūka (शम्बूक):—[from śambu] m. a bivalve shell, any shell or conch, [Kāvya literature; Kathāsaritsāgara; Suśruta] (also f(ā). , [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.])

6) [v.s. ...] a snail, [Horace H. Wilson]

7) [v.s. ...] a kind of animal (= ghoṅgha), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] the edge of the frontal protuberance of an elephant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] Name of a Śūdra (who had become a devotee and was slain by Rāma-candra), [Rāmāyaṇa; Uttararāma-carita] (cf. śambuka)

10) [v.s. ...] of a Daitya, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) Śāmbuka (शाम्बुक):—[from śāmbava] m. a bivalve shell, [Horace H. Wilson]

12) Śāmbūka (शाम्बूक):—[from śāmbava] m. = śāmbuka, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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