Nishkala, Niṣkala, Niṣkalā, Nitkala: 17 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Nishkala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Niṣkala and Niṣkalā can be transliterated into English as Niskala or Nishkala, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Elements of Hindu Iconograpy

Niṣkalā (निष्कला):—In this state all created beings merge their bodies, which they had obtained for the purpose of the enjoyment of actions of the pure and impure kinds, in the primeval cause, and therein suppress all activities. In the niṣkalā state the Supreme Being has no beginning, no limit or boundary and is pervvading everywhere, is indestructible, incomparable, extremely subtle and supreme, and is unknowable by any mode of proof.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Niṣkalā (निष्कला):—Second of the eight Mātṛs born from the body of Ātmī, according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra. These eight sub-manifestations (mātṛ) symbolize the different kinds of souls, as well as the impurities by which these souls are bound (except for Niṣkala or Śiva). They are presided over by the Bhairava Caṇḍa and his consort Brāhmī. Ātmī is the second of the Eight Mahāmātṛs, residing within the Mātṛcakra (third of the five cakras) and represents the ātman.

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal (śaivism)

Niṣkala (निष्कल, “formless”).—According to the Vidyeśvarasaṃhitā of the Śivapurāṇa:—“Śiva alone is glorified as Niṣkala (nameless and formless) since He is identical with supreme Brahman. He is also Sakala as he has an embodied form. He is both Sakala and Niṣkala. It is in his Niṣkala aspect that the Liṅga is appropriate”. The text continues further: “Since He has the Sakala and Niṣkala aspects He is worshipped both in the form of Liṅga and in the embodied form by the people and is called the highest Brahman. Other deities, not being Brahman, have no Niṣkala aspect anywhere.” So according to the Śivapurāṇa a Liṅga installed in the sanctum is a representation of niṣkala, formless aspect of Śiva.

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva

Niṣkala (निष्कल).—Śivatattva represents his Niṣkala form. It is identical with him. Śiva is eternal (nitya) higher than the highest (parātpara), omnipresent, omniscient, omnipotent, pure, uncomparable (anaupamya), the cause of the cause (kāraṇa-kāraṇa). For the benefit of the world Śiva conceives a spontaneous idea, which results in the manifestation of Śakti from his one- thousandth part. Then comes Parā, Ādi, Icchā and Kriyāśakti, each succeeding from the 1/1000 part of the preceeding one. All these Śaktis are Niṣkala. This is Śivasṛṣṭi.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Nishkala in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Niṣkala (निष्कल) and Sakala both refer to epithets of Śiva, as explained in the Śivapurāṇa 1.5.—Accordingly, “Śiva alone is glorified as Niṣkala (nameless and formless) since He is identical with supreme Brahman. He is also Sakala as He has an embodied form. He is both Sakala and Niṣkala. It is in his Niṣkala aspect that the liṅga is appropriate. In the Sakala aspect the worship of his embodied form is appropriate. Since He has the Sakala and Niṣkala aspects He is worshipped both in the phallic and in the embodied form by the people and is called the highest Brahman. Other deities, not being Brahman, have no Niṣkala aspect anywhere”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Nishkala in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Niṣkala (निष्कल) refers to “inarticulate” (a musical term), and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 21.126.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Niṣkalā (निष्कला) means “without parts”, according to the commentary on the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—The Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā stresses that the fifth sacred seat [i.e., Mātaṅga] is unmanifest and hence pervasive. Present in the other seats, it has no specific location of its own. The aspect the goddess assumes here is her undifferentiated form ‘without parts’ (niṣkalā). The Kubjikāmatatantra says that it is the source of the universe. As the universal, primal cause is commonly considered to be the ‘unmanifest’, the two sources implicitly agree.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: A History of Indian Philosophy

According to the Vatula-tantra, Śiva is called niṣkala when all His kalās, that is parts or organs or functions, are concentrated in a unity within Him. In further defining the nature of niṣkalatva, the author says that when the pure and impure elements that contribute to experience are collected together and merged in the original cause, and remain there as the budding cause of all powers that are to develop the universe, we have the niṣkala stage. The commentator supports this idea by quotations from many texts.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

niṣkaḷa (निष्कळ).—a unc Destitute of kaḷā, wanting lustre, splendor, sprightliness, freshness, vigor.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Niṣkala (निष्कल).—a. inarticulate (a musical term); N.21.126.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niṣkala (निष्कल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) 1. Waned, diminished. 2. Impotent, seedless, barren. m.

(-laḥ) 1. Pudendum muliebre. 2. A name of Bramha. 3. A fancied personification of Bramha, for religious cere monies. f. (-lā or -lī) A woman past child bearing, in whom menstruation has ceased. E. nir gone, lost, kala a part &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niṣkalā (निष्कला).—adj., f. , 1. undivided, Mahābhārata 13, 1044. 2. maimed, infirm, Mahābhārata 3, 13851. Sa-kala, adj. f. , 1. whole, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 95. 2. all, [Pañcatantra] 53, 21; 55, 12.

Niṣkalā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nis and kalā (कला).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niṣkala (निष्कल).—[adjective] without parts, undivided; maimed, impotent, barren.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Niṣkala (निष्कल):—[=niṣ-kala] [from niṣ > niḥ] mfn. without parts, undivided, [Upaniṣad; Mahābhārata] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] waned, diminished, decayed, infirm, [Mahābhārata; Daśakumāra-carita]

3) [v.s. ...] seedless, impotent, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] m. an old man, [Horace H. Wilson]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of Śiva, [Śivagītā, ascribed to the padma-purāṇa]

6) [v.s. ...] a receptacle, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] pudendum muliebre, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] f(ā or ī). ([gana] gaurādi) a woman past childbearing or menstruation, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niṣkala (निष्कल):—[ni-ṣkala] (laḥ-lā-laṃ) a. Waned; impotent; full, without parts (God). m. Pudendum muliebre; Brahmā. f. A woman past child-bearing.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Niṣkala (निष्कल):—(nis + kalā)

1) adj. a) ohne Theile, ungetheilt [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 3, 659.] [Medinīkoṣa l. 103.] [Muṇḍakopaniṣad 2, 2, 9.] [ŚVETĀŚV. Upakośā 6, 19.] [Mahābhārata 13, 1044. 14, 1376. 1450.] [Harivaṃśa 11577.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 1, 9, 44. 6, 9, 51. 17, 21. 8, 5, 26.] [Mārkāṇḍeyapurāṇa 23, 45.] [Prabodhacandrodaja 112, 9] (niḥka und niṣka). von Śiva [Śivanāmasahasra] — b) gebrechlich: saṃyatāścāpi dakṣāśca matimantaśca mānavāḥ .. dṛśyante niṣkalāḥ santaḥ prahīnāḥ svasvakarmabhiḥ . [Mahābhārata 3, 13851] [Daśakumāracarita 180, 2] [?(nach WILSON] ein alter Mann). — c) zeugungsunfähig [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 492.] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [Medinīkoṣa] f. ā eine Frau, die nicht mehr gebärt, die Regeln nicht mehr hat [Amarakoṣa 2, 6, 1, 21] [?(nach Śabdakalpadruma soll Amarakoṣa] niṣphalā haben). [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 535.] [Halāyudha 2, 332.] [Śabdaratnāvalī im Śabdakalpadruma] eine alte Frau [Rājanirghaṇṭa im Śabdakalpadruma] f. ī gaṇa gaurādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 4, 1, 41.] [Śabdaratnāvalī im Śabdakalpadruma] —

2) m. Behälter (ādhāra) [Śabdacandrikā im Śabdakalpadruma] die weibliche Scham [Wilson’s Wörterbuch] nach ders. Aut.

--- OR ---

Niṣkala (निष्कल):—

1) a) [WEBER, Rāmatāpanīya Upaniṣad 287.] — b) [Mahābhārata 3, 13851] ist niṣphalāḥ zu lesen; vgl. [Spr. 5100.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Niṣkala (निष्कल):——

1) Adj. (*f. ā) — a) ohne Theile , ungetheilt. — b) *zeugungsunfähig ; f. ā eine Frau , die nicht mehr geiert , die Regeln nicht mehr hat. — c) gebrechlich ; m. ein gebrechlicher alter Mann. — d) [Mahābhārata 3,13851und.12,12521] fehlerhaft für niṣphaka. —

2) *m. — a) Behälter. — b) die weibliche Scham.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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