Nishka, Niṣka: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Nishka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Niṣka can be transliterated into English as Niska or Nishka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Niṣka (निष्क) is another name for Karṣa: a unit of measurement of weight (1 akṣa equals 12mg; 2 karṣas = 1 śukti = 24g), as defined in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning niṣka] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

A relative overview of weight-units is found below, niṣka/karṣa indicated in bold. In case of liquids, the metric equivalents would be the corresponding litre and milliliters.

1 Ratti or Guñjā = 125mg,
8 Rattis - 1 Māṣa = 1g,
4 Māṣa - 1 Kaḻañc = 4g,
12 Māṣas - 1 Karṣa = 12g,
1 Karṣa /Akṣa - 1 Niṣka = 12g,
2 Karṣas - 1 Śukti = 24g,
2 Śukti - 1 Pala = 48g,
2 Palas - 1 Prasṛti = 96g,
2 Prasṛtis - 1 Kuḍava = 192g,
2 Kuḍava - 1 Mānikā = 384g,
2 Mānikās - 1 Prastha (Seru) = 768g,
4 Prasthas - 1 Āḍhaka (Kaṃsa) = 3.072kg,
4 Āḍhakas or Kalaśas - 1 Droṇa = 12.288kg,
2 Droṇas - 1 Surpa = 24.576kg,
2 Surpas - 1 Droṇī (Vahi) = 49.152kg,
4 Droṇīs - 1 Khari = 196.608kg,
1 Pala = 48g,
100 Palas - 1 Tulā = 4.8kg,
20 Tulās - 1 Bhāra = 96kg.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of nishka or niska in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Niṣka (निष्क).—One palam (about one-sixth of a pound) of gold. (Manusmṛti, Cnapter 8).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Niṣka (निष्क).—A gold coin for gifts;1 sin, a fine for wounding or hurting;2 necklace?3 Bala staked 1000 at the first game of gambling, another 1000 at the second and one crore at the succeeding one.4

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 77. 11; Vāyu-purāṇa 80. 16.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 227. 86; Vāyu-purāṇa 101. 160.
  • 3) Bhāgavata-purāṇa III. 23. 31.
  • 4) Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 28. 13-14, 18.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of nishka or niska in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Niṣka (निष्क) is frequently found in the Rigveda and later denoting a gold ornament worn on the neck, as is shown by the two epithets niṣka-kaṇṭha and niṣka-grīva, ‘having a gold ornament on the neck’. A Niṣka of silver is mentioned in the Pañcaviṃśa-brāhmaṇa. As early as the Rigveda traces are seen of the

India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Niṣka.—(IE 8-8; EI 15, 27, 30), name of a gold coin; name sometimes applied to śatamāna, śāna, ṭaṅka, gaṇḍa-māḍa, etc.; cf. gaṇḍa-niṣka, also called gaṇḍa-māḍa. See JNSI, Vol. XVI, pp. 41 ff. (IE 8-8), a gold coin equal to sixteen silver drammas. (EI 5), a coin equal to a half-pagoda. (JNSI, Vol. XV, p. 139), a silver coin equal to one śata- māna. Note: niṣka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

--- OR ---

Niṣka.—gold coin or weight equal to one karṣa (80 ratis or about 146 grains) of 16 māṣas or to 4 or 108 or 150 suvarṇas (q. v.); silver coin equal to one śatamāna (320 ratis); some- times identified with māḍa (q. v.). Note: niṣka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of nishka or niska in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Niṣka (निष्क).—

1) A golden coin (of different values, but generally taken to be equal to one Karṣa or Suvarṇa of 16 Māsas; 'varāṭakānāṃ daśakadvayaṃ yat sā kākiṇī tāśca paṇaścatasraḥ | te ṣoḍaśa dramma ihāvagamyo drammaistathā ṣoḍaśabhiśca niṣkaḥ || māṃsabhettā tu ṣaṣṇiṣkān (daṇḍaḥ) Ms.8.284.

2) A weight of gold equal to 18 or 15 Suvarṇas q. v.

3) A golden ornament for the neck or the breast; हरिचक्रेण तेनास्य कण्ठे निष्कमिवार्पितम् (haricakreṇa tenāsya kaṇṭhe niṣkamivārpitam) Ku.2.49; निष्ककण्ठीः (niṣkakaṇṭhīḥ) (upadevavarastriyaḥ) Bhāg.4.3.6.

4) Gold in general.

5) A golden vessel.

6) A die or dice; L. D. B.

7) Departure, going away; Nm.

-ṣkaḥ A Chāndāla.

Derivable forms: niṣkaḥ (निष्कः), niṣkam (निष्कम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niṣka (निष्क).—mn.

(-ṣkaḥ-ṣkaṃ) 1. A weight of gold, applied however to different quantities: it is considered as synonimous with the Dinara of thirty-two small, or sixteen large Rattis; with the Karsha or Suvarna of sixteen Mashas; with the Pala of four or five Suvarnas; and with the larger Pala or Dinara, which is sometimes reckoned at 108, and othertimes at 150 Suvarnas. 2. Gold in general. 3. Any ornament of the breast. 4. An ornament of the neck. 5. A weight of four Mashas. 6. A weight of silver of four Suvarnas. 7. A value of sixteen Kahons or Dramyas. 8. A chandala. E. ni before, sad to go, Unadi aff. kan, and the radical final rejected or nis + kai-ka or niṣka-ac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niṣka (निष्क).—m. and n. 1. An ornament of the neek or breast, [Harivaṃśa, (ed. Calc.)] 13892; [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 9, 12. 2. A weight of gold, applied, however, to different quantities, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 8, 137. Ii. f. , A measure of length, Mārk. P. 49, 37.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niṣka (निष्क).—[masculine] ([neuter]) a golden ornament for breast or neck (p. niṣkin); [adjective] cert. coin.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Niṣka (निष्क):—[from niṣk] mn. (rarely n.) ([Uṇādi-sūtra iii, 45] [gana] ardharcādi) a golden ornament for the neck or breast (also used as money), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

2) [v.s. ...] later a [particular] coin varying in value at different times (= 1 Dīnāra of 32 small or 16 large Rettis, = 1 Karṣa or Suvarṇa of 16 Māṣas, = 1 Pala of 4 or 5 Su-varṇas, = 1 larger Pala or Dīnāra variously reckoned at 108 or 150 Su-varṇas, = 4 Māṣas, = 16 Drammas; also a weight of silver of 4 Su-varṇas)

3) [v.s. ...] a golden vessel, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] gold, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] m. a Cāṇḍāla, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Niṣkā (निष्का):—[from niṣka > niṣk] f. a measure of length, [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of nishka or niska in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: