Nishevin, Niṣevin, Nishevi, Niṣevī: 9 definitions

Introduction:

Nishevin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Niṣevin and Niṣevī can be transliterated into English as Nisevin or Nishevin or Nisevi or Nishevi, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Niṣevin (निषेविन्) refers to “practitioners (of the Atimārga)”, according to the Vārāṇasīmāhātmya verse 1.116-125.—Accordingly, “[...] And there is no rebirth (udbhava) in this world for those Pāśupata sages who follow the observance of the skull, they who abide by the Atimārga. For the practitioners (niṣevin) of the Atimārga there is only indifference. Those who have set out on the Atimārga only delight in indifference. Those who die on the saline ground go along that path, but of all saline grounds Vārāṇasī is the best, O sage. And there is no sprouting for those who die there. The body abandoned on the cremation ground merges in the Lord of Time. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nishevin in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

nisevi : (aor. of nisevati) associated; pursued; indulged in.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niṣevin (निषेविन्).—i. e. ni-sev + in, adj. 1. Practising, [Harivaṃśa, (ed. Calc.)] 11682. 2. Enjoying, [Rāmāyaṇa] 2, 37, 2. Gorr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niṣevin (निषेविन्).—[adjective] practising, observing, enjoying (—°).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Niṣevin (निषेविन्):—[=ni-ṣevin] [from ni-ṣev] mfn. practising, observing, enjoying (ifc.), [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa etc.]

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Niṣevin (निषेविन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ṇisevi.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nishevin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Ṇisevi (णिसेवि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Niṣevin.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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