Nikhila: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Nikhila means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Nikhil.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Nikhila (निखिल) refers to “entire (universe)”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.24 (“Śiva consents to marry Pārvatī”).—Accordingly, as Viṣṇu said to Śiva: “[...] For attaining you Śivā is born of mountain Himācala. The demon’s death can be at the hands of your son alone begotten of her. This is the boon granted to him by Brahmā. Incapable of being killed by others, the demon harasses the entire universe [i.e., nikhila-jagat]. At the instance of Nārada, she is performing a great penance. All the three worlds consisting of the mobile and immobile beings have been enveloped by her refulgence. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Nikhila (निखिल) refers to the “entire (universe)”, according to Tantrālokaviveka commentary on the Tantrāloka verses 4.228ab.—Accordingly, “[‘As regards the Yogin, moreover, that purity exists with respect to (all) entities’].—Indeed, the majority of bound souls do not perceive even (Śaiva) mantras as having Śiva-nature, and therefore they suppose them to be impure, since they fail (even) to perform their own duties (in employing these mantras). But, as for the Yogin, he perceives (everything,) beginning with the earth, as having that [Śiva-nature]. Therefore, (he perceives that) all of them without exception are completely pure. Indeed, this alone is the very nature of the Yogin as a Yogin, that he perceives this entire universe (nikhilayat nikhilam idaṃ viśvaṃ) as possessed of Śiva-nature. This is definitive”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nikhila in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

nikhila : (adj.) all; entire; whole.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Nikhila, (adj.) (Sk. nikhila cp. khila) all, entire, whole Dāvs. V, 40 (°loka v. l. sakala°). (Page 354)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

nikhila (निखिल).—a S All or the whole. With reference to number or to quantity,

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

nikhila (निखिल).—a All or the whole.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nikhila (निखिल).—a. [nivṛttaṃ khilaṃ śeṣo yasmāt] Complete, whole, entire, all; प्रत्यक्षं ते निखिलमचिराद् भ्रातरुक्तं मया यत् (pratyakṣaṃ te nikhilamacirād bhrātaruktaṃ mayā yat) Me.96; सूर्यांशुभिर्जगदिदं निखिलार्थमेति (sūryāṃśubhirjagadidaṃ nikhilārthameti) Bil. Ch.29.

-lena ind. completely, totally; निखिलेन विचिन्वन्तौ सीतां दशरथात्मजौ (nikhilena vicinvantau sītāṃ daśarathātmajau) Rām. 3.61.2.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nikhila (निखिल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) All, entire, complete. E. ni negative, khila defective. nivṛttaṃ khilaṃ śeṣo yasmāt .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nikhila (निखिल).—probably for niḥkhila, i. e. nis-khila, adj. Complete, entire, all, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 2, 8. Instr. ºlena, adv. Completely, [Rāmāyaṇa] 4, 41, 74.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nikhila (निखिल).—[adjective] entire, whole; [instrumental] [adverb]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nikhila (निखिल):—[=ni-khila] mf(ā)n. complete, all, whole, entire, [Upaniṣad; Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nikhila (निखिल):—[ni-khila] (laḥ-lā-laṃ) a. All, entire.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Nikhila (निखिल) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ṇikhila, Ṇihila.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nikhila in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nikhila in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Nikhila (निखिल) [Also spelled nikhil]:—(a) all, whole, pan.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Ṇikhila (णिखिल) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Nikhila.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nikhila (ನಿಖಿಲ):—[adjective] comprising the full quantity, amount, extent, number, etc., without diminution or exception; entire, full or total; whole.

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Nikhiḷa (ನಿಖಿಳ):—[adjective] = ನಿಖಿಲ [nikhila].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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