Khala, Khalā: 23 definitions

Introduction:

Khala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Khala (खल) is another name (synonym) for Tilakiṭṭa, a Sanskrit name referring to a drug made of the left-overs after expelling oil from the seeds of Sesamum indicum (sesame). This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 16.111-116), which is an Ayurvedic medicinal thesaurus. It can also be spelled as Khalī.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Khala (खल) refers to a “buttermilk preparation” and is a Sanskrit technical term appearing in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva..—Khaḷa [Khala] is known as mukkuṭi among Keralite physicians. It is a buttermilk preparation. Generally drugs are pounded and cooked in buttermilk.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

1) Khala (खल) refers to a “rogue”, and is used by Śiva to describe Brahmā, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.19. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] on hearing this entreaty of Viṣṇu, Śiva of steady resolve proclaimed in reply making everyone hear:—‘O Viṣṇu, Lord of Devas and as dear to me as my vital airs, do not prevent me from killing him. He is a rogue (khala)’”.

Khala (“rogues”) is used by the evil-minded Dakṣa to describe the Brahmins that walked out on his sacrifice, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.27. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] when the sage Dadhīci and others staged a walkout, the evil-minded Dakṣa, inimical to Śiva, said mocking at them.:—‘[...] They are slow-witted and senseless. They are rogues (khala) indulging in false deliberations and discussions. They are out of the Vedic circle. These men of evil conduct shall be eschewed from sacrificial rites’”.

2) Khala (खल) refers to “wicked people”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.28. Accordingly as Śiva said to Satī:—“[...] people wounded with arrows by enemies are not so pained as when their vulnerable points are hit by the taunting words of kinsmen. O beloved, the wicked people (khala) do not observe that their own status is being hit when they attack good men endowed with the six qualities of learning”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Khalā (खला).—A daughter of Bhadrāśva and Ghṛtāci.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 70. 69.

1b) One of the ten daughters of Raudrāśva.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 126.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: OpenEdition books: Vividhatīrthakalpaḥ (Kāvya)

Khala (खल) in Sanskrit refers to “miserable, unbeliever”, as is mentioned in the Vividhatīrthakalpa by Jinaprabhasūri (13th century A.D.): an ancient text devoted to various Jaina holy places (tīrthas).—Note: The connotation of the word is negative in modern languages ​​(CDIAL 3835).

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Khala (खल) is the name of a minister from Śīlapura, according to chapter 6.5 [datta-nandana-prahlāda-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly:—“Now in this southern half of Bharata in Jambūdvīpa there was a king, Mandaradhīra, in the city Śīlapura. He had a son, powerful, long-armed, an ocean of the jewels of good qualities, named Lalitamitra, the sun to the lotuses of friends. The minister Khala affirmed, ‘He is arrogant,’ rejected him, and established the king’s brother as heir-apparent. Then Lalitamitra, disgusted with existence from this humiliation, became a mendicant under Muni Ghoṣasena. [...]”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Khala.—(Chamba, etc.), threshing floor. Note: khala is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

khala : (nt.) threshing floor (for corn). || khaḷa (adj.), rough; harsh. (m.), a rascal; a vile person.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Khala, (cp. Sk. khala) 1. corn ready for threshing, the threshing floor Nd2 587; Vism. 120; DA. I, 203 (khalaṃ sodheti).—2. threshing, mash, in ekamaṃsa-khalaṃ karoti “to reduce to one mash of flesh” D. I, 52=M. I, 377 (+maṃsa-puñja; DA. I, 160=maṃsa-rāsi).

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

khala (खल).—m (S) A metal or stone mortar. 2 Rubbing or pounding in a mortar. Ex. causaṣṭa divasa pimpaḷīcā khala karāvā tēvhāṃ causaṣṭī pimpaḷī hōtī.

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khala (खल).—a (S) Low, vile, base, bad.

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khaḷa (खळ).—f Viscous matter prepared from wheat, rice, dissolved tamarind pods &c.; starch or paste. Pr. paraṭācī khaḷa brāhmaṇācī saḷa (here saḷa stands for wife--pest of a wife) lāgalīca āhē. 2 Flour boiled up in sugar-water--to make gharge &c. 3 Stubborn determination; a fit of sullenness or doggedness. v ghē. 4 m Intermission or suspension; pause (of a work or course). 5 n R A court or yard.

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khaḷa (खळ).—a (khala S) Vile, base, villainous, wicked. Ex. sādhūnindaka parama khaḷa || āmhāsa karasī tū viṭāḷa ||.

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khaḷā (खळा).—m A thin and weak sauce of poor people. See khaḷagaṭa.

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khāla (खाल).—f ( H) Skin, rind, bark. Little used in Maraṭhi but with implication of a caning or beating; thus answering to Hide. v kāḍha g. of o. 2 Hide (of cattle &c.)

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khāla (खाल).—ad R Down, below, underneath.

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khāḷa (खाळ).—m P A gutter or furrow; a channel, artificial or natural, for water.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

khala (खल).—m A mortar; pounding in a mortar. a Low, vile.

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khaḷa (खळ).—f Paste. Doggedness. m Pause. n A court or yard. a Vile, wicked.

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khāla (खाल).—f Skin; rind; bark; hide. ad Down.

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khāḷa (खाळ).—m A gutter. A furrow. A channel.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Khala (खल).—[khal-ac]

1) A threshing floor; खले न पर्षान् प्रति हन्मि भूरि (khale na parṣān prati hanmi bhūri) Rv.1.48.7; Ms.11.17,115; Y.2.282.

2) Earth, soil.

3) Place, site; Bhāg.5.26.14.

4) A heap of dust.

5) Sediment, dregs, deposit of oil &c; दत्ते खले नु निखिलं खलु येन दुग्धम् (datte khale nu nikhilaṃ khalu yena dugdham) Pt.2.53.

6) A mill.

7) A contest, battle.

-laḥ 1 A wicked or mischievous person, a villain; (also a.) low, mischievous, base, villainous, inferior, mean; सर्पः क्रूरः खलः क्रूरः सर्पात् क्रूरतरः खलः । मन्त्रौषधि- वशः सर्पः खलः केन निवार्यते (sarpaḥ krūraḥ khalaḥ krūraḥ sarpāt krūrataraḥ khalaḥ | mantrauṣadhi- vaśaḥ sarpaḥ khalaḥ kena nivāryate) || Chān.26; विषधरतोऽप्यतिवि- षमः खल इति न मृषा वदन्ति विद्वांसः । यदयं नकुलद्वेषी सकुलद्वेषी पुनः पिशुनः (viṣadharato'pyativi- ṣamaḥ khala iti na mṛṣā vadanti vidvāṃsaḥ | yadayaṃ nakuladveṣī sakuladveṣī punaḥ piśunaḥ) || Vās.; cf. Bv.1.76,78,91,98; पीडनं बहुधान्यस्य (pīḍanaṃ bahudhānyasya) ...... करोति यः । खलानां तु वरं ग्रामाद्बहिरेव निवेशनम् (karoti yaḥ | khalānāṃ tu varaṃ grāmādbahireva niveśanam) || Subhaṣ. Mark the pun on the words खल (khala) and बहुधान्यस्य (bahudhānyasya).

2) The sun.

3) The thorn-apple. [खलीकृ (khalīkṛ) means (1) 'to crush'; (2) 'to hurt or injure'; (3) 'to ill-treat, scorn'; परोक्षे खलीकृतोऽयं द्यूतकारः (parokṣe khalīkṛto'yaṃ dyūtakāraḥ) Mk.2.]

Derivable forms: khalaḥ (खलः), khalam (खलम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khala (खल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) 1. Low, vile. base. 2. Low, inferior. 3. Cruel. mischief-making. 4. Bad, wicked. mn.

(-laḥ-laṃ) 1. Earth, mould or soil. 2. Place, site. 3. Sediment, deposit of oil, &c. 4. A granary, a threshing floor. 5. A mill. m.

(-laḥ) 1. The sun. 2. A tree with black blossoms: see tamāla. 3. The Dhatura plant. E. khal to gather, (misfortune, &c.) affix ac.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khala (खल).—I. m. and n. A threshing-floor, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 11, 17. Ii. m. An oilcake, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 53. Iii. m. and f. , 1. Mischievous, Pañc, i. [distich] 443. 2. Vile, [Hitopadeśa] ii. 43.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khala (खल).—1. [masculine] threshing floor, granary; oil-cake (also ī [feminine]).

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Khala (खल).—2. [masculine] a wicked person, villain, ruffian [feminine] ā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Khala (खल):—m. (n. [gana] ardharcādi) a threshing-floor, granary, [Ṛg-veda x, 48, 7; Atharva-veda; Śāṅkhāyana-śrauta-sūtra] etc.

2) earth, mould, soil, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) place, site, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) m. contest, battle, [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska; Nirukta, by Yāska]

5) sediment or dregs of oil, [Pañcatantra ii, 53]

6) (= khaḍa) butter-milk boiled with acid vegetables and spices, [Suśruta i, vi]

7) a mischievous man, [Mṛcchakaṭikā; Cāṇakya; Bhāgavata-purāṇa; Pañcatantra] etc.

8) the sun, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) Xanthochymus pictorius (tamāla), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) the thorn-apple, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) Khalā (खला):—[from khala] f. a mischievous woman, [Amaru-śataka]

12) [v.s. ...] Name of a daughter of Raudrāśva, [Harivaṃśa; Vāyu-purāṇa ii, 37, 122]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Khala (खल):—[(laḥ-lā-laṃ) a.] Low, vile, cruel. 1. m. n. Soil; place; sediment; granary; mill. m. The sun; a tree with black blossoms.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Khāla (खाल) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ukkhāla, Khala.

[Sanskrit to German]

Khala in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Khala (खल) [Also spelled khal]:—(a) wicked, vile, mischievous; (nm) a mortar; villain; ~[nāyaka] a villian; ~[nāyikā] a vamp.

2) Khāla (खाल) [Also spelled khal]:—(nf) skin; hide; —[uḍānā] to flay bare; to give a good thrashing; —[utāranā] to desquamate, to skin; to flay; —[udheḍanā] to beat black and blue, to give one gyp; —[khīṃcakara bhūsā bhara denā] to inflict severe physical punishment; —[khīṃcanā] to peel off the skin, to flay.

3) Khālā (खाला):—(nf) mother’s sister; —[kā ghara] an easy undertaking, a simple job; also ~[jī kā ghara].

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Khala (खल) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Skhala.

2) Khala (खल) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Skhala.

3) Khala (खल) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Khalu.

4) Khala (खल) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Khala.

5) Khāla (खाल) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kṣāla.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Khala (ಖಲ):—

1) [noun] a floor made for thrashing grains; a threshing floor.

2) [noun] the refuse or remaining of the seeds of Sesamum indicum from which oil is extracted.

3) [noun] a fight, esp. a large-scale engagement, between armed forces; a battle.

4) [noun] a small mortar and pestle of metal or stone, used to pound areca nut or to powder medicine.

5) [noun] a villainous, wicked man.

6) [noun] a man belonging to the Koṃkaṇa regionin Western India, between Thane to Goa and between Sahyādri mountains and Arabian sea.

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Khaḷa (ಖಳ):—

1) [noun] a floor made for thrashing grains; a threshing floor.

2) [noun] the refuse or remaining of the seeds of Sesamum indicum from which oil is extracted.

3) [noun] a fight, esp. a large-scale engagement, between armed forces; a battle.

4) [noun] a small mortar and pestle of metal or stone, used to pound areca nut or to powder medicine.

5) [noun] a villainous, wicked man.

6) [noun] a man belonging to the Kokaṇa region in the Western India, that runs from the present Thane in north to Goa in south, and between Sahyādri mountains and Arabian sea.

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Khaḷa (ಖಳ):—[adjective] hard to bear, tolerate or endure; strong; vehement.

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Khaḷa (ಖಳ):—[noun] an evil spirit; a demon; a devil.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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