Nashta, Naṣṭa: 20 definitions

Introduction:

Nashta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Naṣṭa can be transliterated into English as Nasta or Nashta, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Nasht.

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Naṣṭa (नष्ट).—Elided or dropped; a term used as a synonym of 'lupta' in some commentaries.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Naṣṭa (नष्ट) refers to one of the six pratyayas mentioned in the Chandomañjarī 1.14.—The pratyayas are the cause of expansion of metres (chandas). Generally six pratyayas are found in Sanskrit prosody (e.g., Naṣṭa). But Mitrānanda advocates about nine types of pratyayas.

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Naṣṭa (नष्ट) refers to “perished”, as mentioned in verse 3.24 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] In groves cooled by southerly winds, discharging water on all sides, the sun having perished [viz., naṣṭa] in them (as it were because of its being) invisible, showing the splendour of tessellated jewel pavements, resounding with cuckoos, affording excellent places for sexual activities, [...]”.

Note: Naṣṭa (“perished”) has been dropped (including the implied simile) and sūrya (“sun”) turned ñi-mai od (“sunbeams”).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Naṣṭa (नष्ट) refers to “destruction”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.17 (“The dialogue between Indra and Kāmadeva”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā said to Kāma: “[...] Securing a wonderful boon from Brahmā, the great demon Tāraka has become invincible and a pest for everyone. The entire world is harassed by him. Many virtuous rites are destroyed [i.e., naṣṭa]. The gods have become miserable and so also the sages. He had been fought by the gods to the utmost of their ability formerly. But the weapons of all the gods became quite futile. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Naṣṭa (नष्ट) refers to “(that which has been) destroyed”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “[...] Active in the utterance (of mantra that takes place) in the centre, she pervades all things with the mass of (her) red and beautiful rays. (She is) the threefold Nityaklinnā, the universal energy of Śiva, the root goddess who pervades (all things). She awakens the Command that has been destroyed (naṣṭa-ājñā-bodhakartrī) and removes the impurities (that sully the) Rule. She alone is capable of piercing the bridge. She is the garland of thirty-two syllables, the awakened Kaulika Command, the supreme energy (well) deployed. Pure, she is the Light of the Void and she pulses radiantly with waves of rays. She alone conjoins (the fettered to) the path of the Siddhas. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Naṣṭa (नष्ट) refers to the “escape” (of enemies), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 19.129-133, while describing daily rituals]—“[The Mantrin] performs daily fire rites for the prosperity of the kingdom of kings. The [king] enjoys the kingdom happily, there is no doubt. [His] enemies, etc., disappear, even through one pūjā. Overcome, they escape (naṣṭa) into to the ten directions like deer etc., from a lion. Poverty disappears from the [king's] family through the continual application of the rites. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Naṣṭa (नष्ट) refers to the “destruction (of obstacles)”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Glory to the great tree that is stopping the influx of karma whose opponent is conquered [com.—whose obstacle is destroyed (naṣṭāntarāyaḥ)], which is rooted in all the rules of conduct for a mendicant, whose great trunk is restraint, whose full branches are tranquillity, which is covered with the blossom of virtue [and] is beautiful because of producing whole fruit through the reflections. [Thus ends the reflection on] stopping the influx of karma”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Naṣṭa.—(LP), disappeared. Note: naṣṭa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

naṣṭa (नष्ट).—p (S) Lost, ruined, spoiled, damaged, destroyed. It forms many useful compounds; as naṣṭabuddhi Deprived of, or of feeble, understanding; naṣṭātmaja Childless; naṣṭavivēka Inconsiderate, rash, reckless, precipitate; naṣṭēndriya Deprived of one's faculties or bodily senses; naṣṭaiśvarya, naṣṭagati, naṣṭavīrya, naṣṭaparākrama, naṣṭaprabhāva, naṣṭadhana, naṣṭadhairya, naṣṭōpāya, naṣṭacēṣṭa- tā, naṣṭavaṃśa. 2 Vile, hateful, mischievous, destructive.

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nasta (नस्त).—n The line across the mouth of a river, the bar: also a line of hilly land against which the sea dashes.

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nasta (नस्त).—a (Vulgar corr. of naṣṭa) Lost, ruined, damaged, destroyed.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

naṣṭa (नष्ट).—p Lost, ruined, Vile, mischievous, destructive.

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nasta (नस्त).—n The bar: also a line of hilly land against which the sea dashes.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Naṣṭa (नष्ट).—p. p. [naś-kta]

1) Lost, disappeared, vanished, invisible; गगनमिव नष्टतारम् (gaganamiva naṣṭatāram) Pañcatantra (Bombay) 5.6; 2.167.

2) Dead, perished, destroyed.

3) Spoiled, wasted.

4) Fled or run away; नष्टं वर्षधरैर्मनुष्यगणनाभावादकृत्वा त्रपाम् (naṣṭaṃ varṣadharairmanuṣyagaṇanābhāvādakṛtvā trapām) Ratnāvalī 2.3.

5) Deprived of, free from (in comp.)

6) Depraved, corrupted, debauched.

-ṣṭam 1 Destruction, loss.

2) Disappearance.

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Nasta (नस्त).—The nose.

-stam A sternutatory, snuff.

-stā A hole bored in the septum of the nose.

Derivable forms: nastaḥ (नस्तः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Naṣṭa (नष्ट).—mfn.

(-ṣṭaḥ-ṣṭā-ṣṭaṃ) Lost, destroyed, removed, annihilated. E. ṇaśa to perish, affix kta .

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Nasta (नस्त).—m.

(-staḥ) The nose. n.

(-staṃ) A sternutatory, snuff, &c. f.

(-stā) A hole bored in the septum of the nose. E. ṇas to make crooked, affix saṃjñāyāṃ ta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Naṣṭa (नष्ट).—[adjective] lost, disappeared, invisible, fled, escaped ([neuter] [impersonally]), perished, damaged, destroyed; deprived of, less ([ablative] or °—); having lost a cause in court ([jurisprudence]).

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Nastā (नस्ता).—[feminine] a hole bored in the septum of the nose.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Naṣṭa (नष्ट):—[from naś] a mfn. lost, disappeared, perished, destroyed, lost sight of invisible

2) [v.s. ...] escaped (also -vat mfn., [Mahābhārata]), run away from ([ablative]), fled ([impersonal or used impersonally] with [instrumental case] of subj, [Ratnāvalī ii. 3]), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

3) [v.s. ...] spoiled, damaged, corrupted, wasted, unsuccessful, fruitless, in vain, [Manu-smṛti; Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] deprived of ([instrumental case]), [Rāmāyaṇa i, 14, 18] (in [compound] = ‘without’, ‘-less’, ‘un-’; See below)

5) [v.s. ...] one who has lost a lawsuit, [Mṛcchakaṭikā ix, 4.]

6) b See above.

7) Nasta (नस्त):—[from nas] m. the nose, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) Nastā (नस्ता):—[from nasta > nas] f. a hole bored through the septum of the n°, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) Nasta (नस्त):—[from nas] n. a sternutatory, snuff, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Naṣṭa (नष्ट):—[(ṣṭaḥ-ṣṭā-ṣṭaṃ) a.] Lost, destroyed.

2) Nasta (नस्त):—(staḥ) 1. m. Idem. (stā) f. Hole bored in the nose. n. Snuff.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Naṣṭa (नष्ट) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ṇaṭṭha, Ṇasia, Ṇivahia.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nashta in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Naṣṭa (नष्ट) [Also spelled nasht]:—(a) destroyed, perished, annihilated; destructed, ruined; ~[dṛṣṭi] one who has lost his eyesight, rendered blind; ~[buddhi/~mati] stupid, off one’s head; -[bhraṣṭa] destroyed; ruined, destructed; ~[smṛti] one who has lost his memory; —[karanā] to destroy perish, to destruct; to annihilate; to ruin, to demolish; to deform; to waste; to mar; to spoil; to raze.

2) Nāśtā (नाश्ता):—(nm) breakfast; light refreshment; —[pānī] breakfast, light refreshment.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Naṣṭa (ನಷ್ಟ):—

1) [noun] destroyed; spoiled.

2) [noun] ceased to be seen; disappeared.

3) [noun] that is lost.

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Naṣṭa (ನಷ್ಟ):—

1) [noun] a losing or being lost; a loss.

2) [noun] the damage, trouble, disadvantage, deprivation, etc. caused by losing something; a loss.

3) [noun] the act or an instance of disappearing; disappearance.

4) [noun] a man who has lost his thinking, reasoning power as from fear.

5) [noun] ನಷ್ಟ ಕಟ್ಟಿಕೊಡು [nashta kattikodu] naṣṭa kaṭṭikoḍu to make up for a loss, damage, etc.; ನಷ್ಟ ತುಂಬಿಕೊಡು [nashta tumbikodu] naṣṭa tumbikoḍu = ನಷ್ಟ ಕಟ್ಟಿಕೊಡು [nashta kattikodu]; ನಷ್ಟ ಭರ್ತಿಮಾಡು [nashta bhartimadu] naṣṭa bhartimāḍu = ನಷ್ಟ ಕಟ್ಟಿಕೊಡು [nashta kattikodu]; ನಷ್ಟವಾಗು [nashtavagu] naṣṭavāgu to be lost; (loss) to be incurred.

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Nasta (ನಸ್ತ):—[noun] the organ through which normally living beings breathe; the nose.

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Nāśtā (ನಾಶ್ತಾ):—[noun] = ನಾಷ್ಟಾ [nashta].

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Nāṣṭā (ನಾಷ್ಟಾ):—[noun] the light, morning meal; break-fast.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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