Nashta, Naṣṭa: 9 definitions

Introduction

Nashta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Naṣṭa can be transliterated into English as Nasta or Nashta, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Naṣṭa (नष्ट).—Elided or dropped; a term used as a synonym of 'lupta' in some commentaries.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Naṣṭa (नष्ट) refers to one of the six pratyayas mentioned in the Chandomañjarī 1.14.—The pratyayas are the cause of expansion of metres (chandas). Generally six pratyayas are found in Sanskrit prosody (eg., Naṣṭa). But Mitrānanda advocates about nine types of pratyayas.

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Naṣṭa.—(LP), disappeared. Note: naṣṭa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

naṣṭa (नष्ट).—p (S) Lost, ruined, spoiled, damaged, destroyed. It forms many useful compounds; as naṣṭabuddhi Deprived of, or of feeble, understanding; naṣṭātmaja Childless; naṣṭavivēka Inconsiderate, rash, reckless, precipitate; naṣṭēndriya Deprived of one's faculties or bodily senses; naṣṭaiśvarya, naṣṭagati, naṣṭavīrya, naṣṭaparākrama, naṣṭaprabhāva, naṣṭadhana, naṣṭadhairya, naṣṭōpāya, naṣṭacēṣṭa- tā, naṣṭavaṃśa. 2 Vile, hateful, mischievous, destructive.

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nasta (नस्त).—n The line across the mouth of a river, the bar: also a line of hilly land against which the sea dashes.

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nasta (नस्त).—a (Vulgar corr. of naṣṭa) Lost, ruined, damaged, destroyed.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

naṣṭa (नष्ट).—p Lost, ruined, Vile, mischievous, destructive.

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nasta (नस्त).—n The bar: also a line of hilly land against which the sea dashes.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Naṣṭa (नष्ट).—p. p. [naś-kta]

1) Lost, disappeared, vanished, invisible; गगनमिव नष्टतारम् (gaganamiva naṣṭatāram) Pt.5.6; 2.167.

2) Dead, perished, destroyed.

3) Spoiled, wasted.

4) Fled or run away; नष्टं वर्षधरैर्मनुष्यगणनाभावादकृत्वा त्रपाम् (naṣṭaṃ varṣadharairmanuṣyagaṇanābhāvādakṛtvā trapām) Ratn.2.3.

5) Deprived of, free from (in comp.)

6) Depraved, corrupted, debauched.

-ṣṭam 1 Destruction, loss.

2) Disappearance.

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Nasta (नस्त).—The nose.

-stam A sternutatory, snuff.

-stā A hole bored in the septum of the nose.

Derivable forms: nastaḥ (नस्तः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Naṣṭa (नष्ट).—mfn.

(-ṣṭaḥ-ṣṭā-ṣṭaṃ) Lost, destroyed, removed, annihilated. E. ṇaśa to perish, affix kta .

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Nasta (नस्त).—m.

(-staḥ) The nose. n.

(-staṃ) A sternutatory, snuff, &c. f.

(-stā) A hole bored in the septum of the nose. E. ṇas to make crooked, affix saṃjñāyāṃ ta .

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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