Mahayogin, Mahāyogi, Mahāyogin, Mahayogi, Maha-yogin, Mahāyogī: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Mahayogin means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Mahayogin in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Mahāyogi (महायोगि) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Rudrakoṭi, one of the sixty-eight places hosting a svāyambhuvaliṅga, which is one of the most sacred of liṅgas according to the Śaivāgamas. The list of sixty-eight svāyambhuvaliṅgas and presiding deities (e.g., Mahāyogi) is found in the commentary on the Jirṇoddhāra-daśaka by Nigamajñānadeva. The word liṅga refers to a symbol used in the worship of Śiva and is used thoughout Śaiva literature, such as the sacred Āgamas.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Mahayogin in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mahāyogin (महायोगिन्) refers to a “great Yogin”, and is used as an epithet of Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.23. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] One day after delighting the lord with her devotion and obeisance Satī, the daughter of Dakṣa, spoke thus to Śiva: ‘O great lord, lord of lords and ocean of mercy, O great Yogin [viz., Mahāyogin], the uplifter of the distressed, take pity on me’”.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Mahāyogī (महायोगी) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. XIV.8.25, XIV.8) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mahāyogī) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Mahayogin in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Mahāyogī (महायोगी) (lit. “one who is a great yogi”) is a synonym (another name) for the Kukkuṭa, according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Mahāyogin (महायोगिन्) (lit. “one who is a great yogi”) is a synonym (another name) for the Blue jay (Cāṣa), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Mahāyogin (महायोगिन्) refers to a group of deities summoned by the Yamāntaka-mantra and mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Mahāyogin).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Mahayogin in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: The Jaina Iconography

Mahāyogī (महायोगी) is the name of a Yoginī mentioned in various Jaina manuscripts, often being part of a list of sixty-four such deities. How the cult of the Tantrik Yoginīs originated among the vegetarian Jainas is unknown. The Yoginīs (viz., Mahāyogī) are known as attendants on Śiva or Pārvatī. But in the case of Jainism, we may suppose, as seen before that they are subordinates to Kṣetrapāla, the chief of the Bhairavas.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahayogin in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahāyogin (महायोगिन्).—m.

1) an epithet of Śiva.

2) of Viṣṇu.

3) a cock.

Mahāyogin is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and yogin (योगिन्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāyogin (महायोगिन्).—[masculine] great Yogin, [Epithet] of Viṣṇu & Śiva.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mahāyogin (महायोगिन्):—[=mahā-yogin] [from mahā > mah] m. a gr° Yogin (Name of Viṣṇu or of Śiva, [especially] when worshipped by Buddhists, [Monier-Williams’ Buddhism 215]), [Mahābhārata]

2) [v.s. ...] a cock, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

[Sanskrit to German]

Mahayogin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahayogin in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mahāyōgi (ಮಹಾಯೋಗಿ):—

1) [noun] a great yogi or sage.

2) [noun] Śiva.

3) [noun] Viṣṇu.

4) [noun] a chicken; a hen or rooster.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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