Anganyasa, Aṅganyāsa, Anga-nyasa: 7 definitions

Introduction

Anganyasa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous (A) next»] — Anganyasa in Shaktism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Aṅganyāsa (अङ्गन्यास):—The sanskrit name of a tantric ritual translating to “Installation of Ancillary Mantras”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (A) next»] — Anganyasa in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Aṅganyāsa (अङ्गन्यास) refers to “ritualistic placing of the finger over the different parts of the body as prescribed”, as defined in the Śivapurāṇa 1.17. Accordingly, “[...] a Mahāyogin who performs Japas and meditations perpetually of Śiva in the form of Praṇava and maintains mystic trance, certainly becomes Śiva Himself. He must perform Japas after duly performing the Aṅganyāsa (ritualistic placing of the finger over the different parts of the body as prescribed) and invoke the sages concerned, the deities presiding over and the name of the metre in which the verse is composed. The devotee who practises the Japa of Praṇava (Om) with due ritualistic placings of fingers on the parts of his body (aṅganyāsa) becomes a sage. He shall attain all the benefits of the ritualistic Nyāsa such as the blessings of ten mothers and the (attainment of) six pathways”.

Aṅganyāsa is also mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa 1.20 while explaining the mode of worshipping an earthen phallic image (pārthiva-liṅga) according to the Vedic rites:—“[...] the Nyāsa rite shall be duly performed and the Aṅganyāsa of the two hands shall also be performed. The devotee shall perform meditation with the six-syllabled mantra—Om namaśśivāya”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous (A) next»] — Anganyasa in Shaivism glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Temple management in the Āgamas

Aṅganyāsa (अङ्गन्यास) refers to certain a ceremony to be performed during pūjā (ritualistic worship), according to the Arcanāvidhipaṭala of Kāmikāgama.—The Ācārya then chants the ṣaḍaṅgamantra and performs aṅganyāsa. The Āgama says that just as the sun and fire are powerful by their rays, the aṅgamantras are similarly powerful, being śivasvarūpa and representing the six qualities of the Lord. Then the Ācārya performs amṛtīkaraṇa, with the appropriate mudrā, meditating on the Lord who has the six adhvās for his body, is ever beneficent, is ever with sakti and is ever blissful, having the directions for his faces.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous (A) next»] — Anganyasa in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

aṅganyāsa (अंगन्यास).—m S A religious rite in fixing the dēva &c. Touching the body in sixteen places, repeating the mantra &c. Also m pl.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (A) next»] — Anganyasa in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Aṅganyāsa (अङ्गन्यास).—[aṅgeṣu mantra- bhedasya nyāsaḥ] touching the limbs of the body with the hand accompanied by appropriate Mantras.

Derivable forms: aṅganyāsaḥ (अङ्गन्यासः).

Aṅganyāsa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms aṅga and nyāsa (न्यास).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅganyāsa (अङ्गन्यास).—m.

(-saḥ) Touching various parts of the body, as a religious ceremony. E. aṅga, and nyāsa arrangement.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅganyāsa (अङ्गन्यास):—[=aṅga-nyāsa] [from aṅga] m. ceremony of touching certain parts of the body.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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