Lakula, aka: Lākula; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Lakula means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Lākula (लाकुल).—The direct precursors of Kāpālikas were the Lākulas, also called Kālamukhas and Mahāvratas. They were the first Śaiva sect to practice the mahāvrata (lit. great observance), which required a full assimilation to Bhairava. In addition to carrying the skull-bowl, they wore a sacred thread (yajñopavīta) made of human hair obtained from corpses, and they adorned themselves with ornaments mostly made of human bones: a necklace, earrings, bracelets or armlets, and a hair jewel (śikhāmaṇi). Ashes were used to cover the body, a practice that originated with the Pāśupatas.

Lākulas were also to carry a skull-topped staff (khaṭvāṅga) and to meditate on Rudra (see Śiva), who was to be seen as all things, and whose highest manifestation was considered to be Dhruva.

Source: academia.edu: Kāpālikas
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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