Brahmamantra, aka: Brahmāmantra, Brahma-mantra; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Brahmamantra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Brahmamantra in Natyashastra glossary... « previous · [B] · next »

Brahmāmantra (ब्रह्मामन्त्र).—Before any dramatic performance (nāṭya) takes place, gods and demigods should be worshipped (pūjā) in ceremonies such as the ‘consecration of the mattavāraṇī’. According to the Nāṭyaśāstra 3.40-44 gods and demigods should be worshipped with offerings (eg. different kinds of foodstuff ) and mantras.

The mantra for Brahmā, to be uttered at the time of making offering, goes as follows:

देवदेव महाभाग सर्वलोकपितामह ।
मन्त्रपूतमिमं सर्वं प्रतिगृह्णीष्व मे बलिम् ॥

devadeva mahābhāga sarvalokapitāmaha |
mantrapūtamimaṃ sarvaṃ pratigṛhṇīṣva me balim ||

“O the god of gods, the most lordly one, the lotus-born one, the grand-father [of the worlds] accept this my offering consecrated by the Mantra.”

According to Nāṭyaśāstra 3.96-97, “Offering worship to the gods of the stage is as meritorious as a [Vedic] sacrifice. No dramatic performance should be made without first worshipping the deities presiding over the stage. When worshipped, they (these gods) will bring you worship, and honoured they will bring you honour. Hence one should by all efforts offer pūjā to the gods of the stage.”

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

Discover the meaning of brahmamantra in the context of Natyashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Brahmamantra in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [B] · next »

Brahmamantra (ब्रह्ममन्त्र).—Lākula initiation involved, as a preliminary, the empowering of the disciple with the five brahmamantras (mantras associated with the five different forms of Śiva) of vedic origin, also employed by the Pāśupatas.

Source: academia.edu: Kāpālikas
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of brahmamantra in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geogprahy

Brahmamantra in India history glossary... « previous · [B] · next »

Brahma-mantra.—(IA 12), five in number. Note: brahma-mantra is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of brahmamantra in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 3525 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Brahma
Brahmā (ब्रह्मा), the creator of the universe, is one among the Trinity. Usually the image of B...
Mantra
Mantra (मन्त्र) refers to “mystic syllables” and is associated with the worship of a deity (pūj...
Brahmaloka
Brahmaloka (ब्रह्मलोक) refers to fourteen Brahmā worlds, as defined in the Śivapurāṇa 1.17. Acc...
Brahmayajna
Brahmayajña (ब्रह्मयज्ञ) refers to the “regular study of the Vedas”, as defined in the Śivapurā...
Brahmasutra
Brahmasūtra (ब्रह्मसूत्र).—n. (-traṃ) 1. The sacrificial or Brahminical thread. 2. An aphorism ...
Brahmavihara
Brahmavihāra (ब्रह्मविहार).—m. (= Pali id.; compare vihāra), brahmic (supreme, highest religiou...
Brahmasthana
Brahma-sthāna.—(SII 13; SITI), explained as ‘an assembly hall’; the Brāhmaṇa quarters of a vill...
Brahmacari
1) Brahmacāri (ब्रह्मचारि).—See Brahmacarya.2) Brahmacāri (ब्रह्मचारि).—A devagandharva (a clas...
Brahmapurana
Brahmapurāṇa (ब्रह्मपुराण).—(brāhmapurāṇa) This is a great book of twenty-five thousand verses...
Brahmarakshasa
Brahmarākṣasa (ब्रह्मराक्षस).—a kind of ghost, the ghost of a Brāhmaṇa, who during his life tim...
Brahmatirtha
Brahmatīrtha or Brahmatīrtheśvara refers to one of the sixteen liṅgas worshipped in the maṇḍapa...
Brahma-muhurta
Brāhmamuhūrta (ब्राह्ममुहूर्त).—The period of forty-eight minutes before the sunrise is called ...
Brahmahatya
Brahmahatyā (ब्रह्महत्या).—f. (-tyā) 1. Brahminicide, killing a Brahman. 2. Any crime equally h...
Brahmadanda
Brahmadaṇḍa (ब्रह्मदण्ड).—1) the curse of a Brāhmaṇa; एकेन ब्रह्मदण्डेन बहवो नाशिता मम (ekena b...
Sumantra
Sumantra.—(HD), king's counsellor on matters relating to income and expenditure. See Hist. Dhar...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: