Bhima, aka: Bhīmā, Bhīma; 27 Definition(s)

Introduction

Bhima means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

[Bhima in Natyashastra glossaries]

One of the Hands of Famous Emperors.—Bhīma: Muṣṭi hand moved forward.

(Source): archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Natyashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana

[Bhima in Purana glossaries]

1) Bhīma (भीम):—Son of Vijaya (one of the six sons of Purūravā and Urvaśī). He had a son named Kāñcana. (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.15.2)

2) Bhīma (भीम):—One of the sons of Pāṇḍu, begotten by Dharmarāja (god of wind) through the womb his wife Kuntī. Also known as Bhīmasena (भीमसेन). He had a son by his wife Draupadī named Śrutasena. He also had another son named Ghaṭotkaca through his wife Hiḍimbā and a son named Sarvagata through his wife Kālī (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.22.27-28)

(Source): Wisdom Library: Bhagavata Purana

Bhimā (भिमा) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (eg., Bhimā) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

(Source): Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

1) Bhīmā (भीमा).—Name of a river (nadī) situated near the seven great mountains on the western side of mount Naiṣadha, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 83. These settlements consume the water flowing from these seven great mountains (Viśākha, Kambala, Jayanta, Kṛṣṇa, Harita, Aśoka and Vardhamāna). Niṣadha (Naiṣadha) is one of the seven mountains located in Jambūdvīpa, ruled over by Āgnīdhra, a grandson of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

2) Bhīma (भीम).—One of the twelve rākṣasas facing the twelve ādityas in the battle of the gods (devas) between the demons (asuras), according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 94. This battle was initiated by Mahiṣāsura in order to win over the hand of Vaiṣṇavī, the form of Trikalā having a red body representing the energy of Viṣṇu. Trikalā is the name of a Goddess born from the combined looks of Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Maheśvara (Śiva).

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

1a) Bhīma (भीम).—The son of Vijaya and father of Kāñcana.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 15. 3.

1b) Śiva with ākāśasthāna; wife, Diks and son Svarga;1 the sixth name of Mahādeva, with the ākāśa element predominating; hence nuisance should not be committed nor conjugal union in the open.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 10. 81; Vāyu-purāṇa 27. 14, 45, and 54.
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 10. 14, 50.

1c) A Vaikuṇṭha God;1 with the sun in the months, Madhu and Mādhava.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 36. 57.
  • 2) Ib. II. 23. 3.

1d) A Marut of the third gaṇa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 5. 94; Vāyu-purāṇa 67. 126.

1e) A Mauneya Gandharva.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 3.

1f) A son of Khaśā and a Rākṣasa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 133; Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 165.

1g) A Vānara chief.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 235.

1h) A king; the son of Amāvasu, and father of Kāñcanaprabha;1 a Viśvajit.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 66. 23; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 7. 2-3.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 91. 52.

1i) (Bhīmasena) the Pāṇḍava, who killed Jarāsandha and gave his chariot to Kṛṣṇa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 68. 28; Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 35. 28.

1j) One of the eleven Rudras; a son of Bhūta and Sarūpā;1 the presiding deity of ākāśa.2

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 153. 19; Bhāgavata-purāṇa VI. 6. 17; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 34. 41. Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 8. 6.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 265. 42.

1k) An Asura of the Atala region.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 50. 17.

1l) A Rākṣasa gaṇa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 165.

1m) A son of Mahāvīrya.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 162.

2a) Bhīmā (भीमा).—A mother-goddess;1 enshrined in Himādri.2

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 179. 22.
  • 2) Ib. 13. 47.

2b) A R of the Ketumālā country.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 44. 18.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Shilpashastra (iconography)

[Bhima in Shilpashastra glossaries]

1) Bhīma (भीम):—One of the eight names of Rudra, given to him by Brahmā, according to the Pādma-purāṇa. This aspect became the presiding deity over the ether (ākāśa). The corresponding name of the consort is Diśā. His son is called Śunda.

2) Bhīma (भीम):—Seventh of the eleven emanations of Rudra (ekādaśa-rudra), according to the Aṃśumadbhedāgama and the Śilparatna. The images of this aspects of Śiva should have three eyes, four arms, jaṭāmakuṭas and be of white colour. It should be draped also in white clothes and be standing erect (samabhaṅga) on a padmapīṭha. It should be adorned with all ornaments and with garlands composed of all flowers and it should keep their front right hand in the abhaya and the front left hand in the varada poses, while it should carry in the back right hand the paraśu and in the back left hand the mṛga.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Elements of Hindu Iconograpy

Bhima (भिम) refers to one of the forty-seven tānas (tone) used in Indian music.—The illustration of Bhima (as a deity) according to 15th-century Indian art is as follows.—The colour of his body is yellow. His face is similar to the face of a Krauñca. A viṇā is held with both hands.

The illustrations (of, for example Bhima) are found scattered throughout ancient Jain manuscripts from Gujarat. The descriptions of these illustrations of this citrāvalī are based on the ślokas of Vācanācārya Gaṇi Sudhākalaśa’s Saṅgītopaniṣatsāroddhāra (14th century) and Śārṅgadeva’s Saṅgītaratnākara (13th century).

(Source): archive.org: Illustrations of Indian Music and Dance in Western Indian Style
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Shilpashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[Bhima in Shaivism glossaries]

1) Bhīmā (भीमा, “fearful”):—One of the nine Dūtī presided over by one of the nine bhaivaravas named Hāṭakeśa (emanation of Ananta, who is the central presiding deity of Dūtīcakra), according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra and the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā.

2) Bhīmā (भीमा):—One of the twelve guṇas associated with Gola, the sixth seat of the Svādhiṣṭhāna-chakra. According to tantric sources such as the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the Gorakṣasaṃhitā (Kādiprakaraṇa), these twelve guṇas are represented as female deities. According to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā however, they are explained as particular syllables. They (eg. Bhīmā) only seem to play an minor role with regard to the interpretation of the Devīcakra (first of five chakras, as taught in the Kubjikāmata-tantra).

3) Bhīmā (भीमा):—Sanskrit name of one of the thirty-two female deities of the Somamaṇḍala (second maṇḍala of the Khecarīcakra) according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. These goddesses are situated on a ring of sixteen petals and represent the thirty-two syllables of the Aghoramantra. Each deity (including Bhīmā) is small, plump and large-bellied. They can assume any form at will, have sixteen arms each, and are all mounted on a different animal.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

1) Bhīma (भीम) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Saptagodāvara, one of the sixty-eight places hosting a svāyambhuvaliṅga, which is one of the most sacred of liṅgas according to the Śaivāgamas. The list of sixty-eight svāyambhuvaliṅgas and presiding deities (eg., Bhīma) is found in the commentary on the Jirṇoddhāra-daśaka by Nigamajñānadeva. The word liṅga refers to a symbol used in the worship of Śiva and is used thoughout Śaiva literature, such as the sacred Āgamas.

2) Bhīma (भीम) refers to one of the “eight lords of divisions” (vigraheśvara) associated with the so-called eight divisions (vigraha) according to the Mataṅgapārameśvara (1.8.83–5). These “eight lords of divisions” are also mentioned in a copper-plate inscription found in Malhar, Chhattisgarh, written around 650 CE. The eight divisions (vigraha) represent the uppermost part of the Lākulas’ impure universe.

All these manifestations of Śiva (eg., Bhīma) appear at the borders of various divisions of the universe according to the Lākula system.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Śaivism

1) Bhīma (भीम) is the name of a deity who received the Sahasrāgama from Kāla through the mahānsambandha relation, according to the pratisaṃhitā theory of Āgama origin and relationship (sambandha). The sahasra-āgama, being part of the ten Śivabhedāgamas, refers to one of the twenty-eight Siddhāntāgamas: a classification of the Śaiva division of Śaivāgamas. The Śaivāgamas represent the wisdom that has come down from lord Śiva, received by Pārvatī and accepted by Viṣṇu.

Bhīma obtained the Sahasrāgama from Kāla who in turn obtained it from Sadāśiva through parasambandha. Bhīma in turn, transmitted it to Dharma who then, through divya-sambandha, transmitted it to the Devas who, through divyādivya-sambandha, transmitted it to the Ṛṣis who finally, through adivya-sambandha, revealed the Sahasrāgama to human beings (Manuṣya). (also see Anantaśambhu’s commentary on the Siddhāntasārāvali of Trilocanaśivācārya)

2) Bhīma (भीम) or Bhīmāgama refers to one of upāgamas (supplementary scriptures) of the Kāraṇāgama which is one of the twenty-eight Siddhāntāgama: a classification of the Śaiva division of Śaivāgamas. The Śaivāgamas represent the wisdom that has come down from lord Śiva, received by Pārvatī and accepted by Viṣṇu. The purpose of revealing upāgamas (eg., Bhīma Āgama) is to explain more elaborately than that of mūlāgamas (eg., Kāraṇa-āgama) and to include any new idea if not dealt in mūlāgamas.

(Source): Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Itihasa (narrative history)

[Bhima in Itihasa glossaries]

Bhīma (भीम) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.59.42, I.65, I.89.15) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Bhīma) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Bhīmā also refers to the name of a River mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.21).

(Source): JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
context information

Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Itihasa from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[Bhima in Shaktism glossaries]

Bhīma (भीम) or Bhīmatantra refers to one of the thirty-three Dakṣiṇatantras, belonging to the Śāktāgama (or Śāktatantra) division of the Āgama tradition. The Śāktāgamas represent the wisdom imparted by Devī to Īśvara and convey the idea that the worship of Śakti is the means to attain liberation. According to the Pratiṣṭhālakṣaṇasamuccaya of Vairocana, the Śāktatantras are divided into to four parts, the Bhīma-tantra belonging to the Dakṣiṇa class.

(Source): Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva (shaktism)
Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

Katha (narrative stories)

[Bhima in Katha glossaries]

Bhīma (भीम) is the name of a Vidyādhara, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 46. Accordingly, as Sumeru said to Maya and Sūryaprabha: “... there is a Vidyādhara of the name of Bhīma, and Brahmā loved his wife at will; from this connection he sprang. Since he sprang from Brahmā in a secret way, he is called Brahmagupta. Hence he speaks in a style characteristic of his birth”.

In chapter 47, Bhīma’s strength is considered as equaling a double-power warrior (dviguṇaratha). Accordingly, as the Asura Maya explained the arrangement of warriors in Sunītha’s army: “... [Bhīma, and others], these are all warriors of double power”.

The story of Bhīma was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Bhīma, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Katha from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Hinduism)

[Bhima in Hinduism glossaries]

In the satyayuga, there was a glorious rājā of the lunar lineage named Bhīma. After him, there were three more rājās of this lineage named Bhīmasena up to Bhīma, the son of Kuntī. The Pāṇḍava Bhīma was the third Bhīma of the lunar lineage.

(Source): Google Books: Narmadāparikramā - Circumambulation of the Narmadā River

The third of the five Pandava brothers who are the heroes in the Mahabharata, the later of the two great Hindu epics. Bhima is born when his mother, Kunti, uses a powerful mantra (sacred sound) to have a son by the wind-god, Vayu. Of all the Pandavas, Bhima is the largest and strongest, and his favorite weapon is the club, which requires great physical strength.

(Source): Google Books: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Hinduism

Bhīma (भीम): The second of Pāndavas who excelled in physical prowess as he was born of the wind-god.

(Source): WikiPedia: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

[Bhima in Theravada glossaries]

A sage of old who possessed the five abhinna and great iddhi powers.

The Bodhisatta, at that time, was a learned brahmin, and, having met Bhima, said that he was a sensualist (kama bhogi), and his disciples agreed with him. It was for this reason the Buddha and five hundred monks suffered calumny at the hands of Sundarika. Ap.i.299; UdA.264.

-- or --

. The name of a celestial musician or a musical instrument. VvA.93, 96, 211, 372.

(Source): Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Theravada from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[Bhima in Jainism glossaries]

Bhīma (भीम) is the name of a class of rākṣasas according to both the Digambara and the Śvetāmbara traditions. The rākṣasas refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The rākṣasas are black and their caitya-vṛkṣas (sacred-tree) is Kaṇṭaka according to the Digambara They are white and have a fierce appearance according to Śvetāmbara.

The deities such as the Bhīmas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Jainism

Bhīma (भीम) refers to one of the two Indras (lords) of the Rākṣasa class of “peripatetic celestial beings” (vyantara), itself a main division of devas (celestial beings) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 4.6. Bhīma and Mahābhīma are the two lords in the class ‘demon’ peripatetic celestial beings.

(Source): Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 4: The celestial beings (deva)
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geogprahy

[Bhima in India history glossaries]

Bhīma (भीम) is an example of a Śaivite and Vaiṣṇavite name mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. Classification of personal names according to deities (eg., from Śaivism and Vaiṣṇavism) were sometimes used by more than one person and somehow seem to have been popular. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. Derivation of personal names (eg., Bhīma) during the rule of the Guptas followed patterns such as tribes, places, rivers and mountains.

Bhīma is also an example of a name based on an Epic or Purāṇa.

(Source): archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Bhīma (भीम) of the Śilāra (i.e., Śilāhāra) line of kings is mentioned in the Paṭṭaṇakuḍi plates of Avasara II.—“After Indrarāja was born his son known in the world by the name of Bhīma, who was possessed of political wisdom and was most liberal and fearless—who, well-known as he was by all qualities like Bhima, was resorted to by all meritorious people. (He) who, being quite invincible like Rāhu, annexed the beautiful Candramaṇḍala even as Rāhu devours the charming orb of the moon ; and who, being attractive like Cupid, made the minds of proud women give up their vanity. During the unrivalled and augmenting reign, here in Balinagara, which has become venerable by the Cupid-like great beauty and good fortune of his son, King Avasara(II), who, like Yudhiṣṭhira, is adorned will matchless virtues such as truthfulness, and liberality”.

These copper plates (mentioning Bhīma) were obtained from Tonappa Parisa Upadhye, the priest of the Jain basti of Paṭṭaṇakudi, who claims that they have been preserved as heirloom in his family. The inscription refers itself to the reign of the Śilāra (i.e. Śilāhāra) king Avasara II, ruling from Balinagara. The inscription is dated in the expired Śaka year 910 (expressed in words), the cyclic year being Sarvadhārin, on Monday, the fifth tithi of the bright fortnight of Kārttika.

(Source): What is India: Inscriptions of the Śilāhāras
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Bhima in Pali glossaries]

bhīma : (adj.) dreadful; horrible.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Bhīma, (adj.) (fr. bhī, cp. Vedic bhīma) dreadful, horrible, cruel, awful J. IV, 26; Miln. 275.

—kāya of horrible body, terrific J. V, 165. —rūpa of terrifying appearance Th. 2, 353. —sena having a terrifying army J. IV, 26; VI, 201. Also Np. of one of the 5 sons of King Paṇḍu J. V, 426; Vism. 233. (Page 505)

(Source): Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Marathi-English dictionary

[Bhima in Marathi glossaries]

bhīma (भीम).—a S Fearful, formidable, terrible, fear-inspiring--a person or matter. Ex. taṃva rākṣasa uṭhalē tāntaḍī || bhīma kōlhāḷa kariti ||.

--- OR ---

bhīma (भीम) [or भीमसेन, bhīmasēna].—m (S) The name of one of the five pāṇḍava princes, a celebrated warrior. Hence, appellatively, a person of gigantic size and voracious appetite.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bhīma (भीम).—a Fearful, terrible.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Bhima in Sanskrit glossaries]

Bhīma (भीम).—a. [bibhetyasmāt, bhī apādāne maka] Fearful, terrific, terrible, dreadful, formidable; न भेजिरे भीमविषेण भीतिम् (na bhejire bhīmaviṣeṇa bhītim) Bh.2.8; R.1.16;3.54.

-maḥ 1 An epithet of Śiva. and Viṣṇu; भीमो भीमपराक्रमः (bhīmo bhīmaparākramaḥ) V. Sah.

2) The Supreme Being.

3) The sentiment of terror (= bhayānaka q. v.).

4) Name of the second Pāṇḍava prince. [He was begotten on Kuntī by the god Wind. From a child he showed that he was possessed of extraordinary strength and hence he was called Bhīma. He had too a most voracious appetite, and was called Vṛkodara, or 'wolf bellied'. His most effective weapon was his mace (gadā). He played a very important part in the great war, and, on the last day of the battle, smashed the thigh of Duryodhana with his unfailing mace, Some of the principal events of his earlier life are his defeat of the demons Hiḍimba and Baka, the overthrow of Jarāsandha, the fearful vow which he uttered against the Kauravas and particularly against Duhśāsana for his insulting conduct towards Draupadī, the fulfilment of that vow by drinking Duhśāsana's blood, the defeat of Jayadratha, his duel with Kīchaka while he was serving as headcook (ballava) to king Virāṭa, and several other exploits in which he showed his usual extraordinary strength. His name has become proverbial for one who possesses immense strength and courage].

-mam Horror, terror.

--- OR ---

Bhīmā (भीमा).—

1) An epithet of Durgā.

2) A kind of perfume (rocanā).

3) A whip.

4) Name of a river.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of bhima in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 260 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Bhimarathi
Bhīmarathī (भीमरथी).—(BHĪMĀ). A river in the South extolled in the purāṇas. Sins of those who b...
Bhimaratha
1) Bhīmaratha (भीमरथ).—A king of the family of Viśvāmitra. His father was Ketumān and Divodāsa ...
Bhimasena
Bhīmasena (भीमसेन) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.59.41, I.65, I.89.48) and rep...
Mahabhima
Mahābhīma (महाभीम).—an epithet of king Śantanu. Derivable forms: mahābhīmaḥ (महाभीमः).Mahābhīma...
Bhimavega
Bhīmavega (भीमवेग) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.108.7) and represents one of ...
Bhimaparakrama
Bhīmaparākrama (भीमपराक्रम).—a. of terrific prowess. -maḥ Name of Viṣṇu. Bhīmaparākrama is a Sa...
Bhimanada
Bhīmanāda (भीमनाद).—a. sounding dreadfully. (-daḥ) 1 a loud or dreadful sound; भीमनादमयमाहतोच्च...
Bhimatantra
Bhīmatantra (भीमतन्त्र) or simply Bhīma refers to one of the thirty-one Dakṣiṇatantras, belongi...
Bhimatana
Bhimatāna (भिमतान) is another name for bhima: one of the forty-seven tānas (tone) used in India...
Bhimashasana
Bhīmaśāsana (भीमशासन).—an epithet of Yama. Derivable forms: bhīmaśāsanaḥ (भीमशासनः).Bhīmaśāsana...
Bhimanjas
Bhīmāñjas (भीमाञ्जस्).—a. having terrible strength. Bhīmāñjas is a Sanskrit compound consisting...
Bhimakarman
Bhīmakarman (भीमकर्मन्).—a. of terrific prowess; पौण्ड्रं दध्मौ महाशङ्खं भीमकर्मा वृकोदरः (pauṇ...
Bhimavikranta
Bhīmavikrānta (भीमविक्रान्त).—a. fearfully powerful. -taḥ a lion. Bhīmavikrānta is a Sanskrit c...
Bhimadarshana
Bhīmadarśana (भीमदर्शन).—a. frightful in appearance, hideous. Bhīmadarśana is a Sanskrit compou...
Bhimodari
Bhīmodarī (भीमोदरी).—an epithet of Umā. Bhīmodarī is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the term...

Relevant text