Jitashatru, Jitaśatru, Jita-shatru: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Jitashatru means something in Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Jitaśatru can be transliterated into English as Jitasatru or Jitashatru, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Jitashatru in Mahayana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Lokottaravāda

Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु) is the name of a Buddha under whom Śākyamuni (or Gautama, ‘the historical Buddha’) acquired merit along the first through nine bhūmis, according to the Mahāvastu. There are in total ten bhūmis representing the ten stages of the Bodhisattva’s path towards enlightenment.

Jitaśatru is but one among the 500 Buddhas enumerated in the Mahāvastu during a conversation between Mahākātyāyana and Mahākāśyapa, both principle disciples of Gautama Buddha. The Mahāvastu is an important text of the Lokottaravāda school of buddhism, dating from the 2nd century BCE.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Jitashatru in Jainism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु) is the father of Ajita, the second of twenty-four Tīrthaṅkaras in Janism, according to the Ācāradinakara (14th century work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri). A Tīrthaṅkara is an enlightened being who has conquered saṃsāra (cycle of birth and death), leaving behind him a path for others to follow.

The wife of Jitaśatru is is Vijayā. It is an ancient Jain practice to worship the Tīrthaṅkara’s parents in various rites, such as the pratiṣṭhāvidhi.

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु) is the name of an ancient king from Vinītā, according to chapter 2.2 [ajitanātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly: “In this city (i.e., Vinītā), Jitaśatru was king, like a broad umbrella of the Ikṣvāku-family warding off heat (pain) from all. His virtues, bravery, etc., gained a lord in his very brilliant glory, like the constellations having a lord in the moon. [...] While he was ruling the earth, kings constantly bore his command on their heads like diadems. He took choice treasures from the earth and distributed them for the benefit of all the people, like a cloud giving rain. He thought constantly in accord with dharma, he spoke in accord with dharma, he acted in accord with dharma. Everything on his part was based on dharma”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jitashatru in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु).—a. victorious.

Jitaśatru is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jita and śatru (शत्रु).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु).—name of a former Buddha: Lalitavistara 5.15 (confirmed Tibetan); follows Lokābhilāṣita, precedes Saṃpūjita; Mahāvastu i.136.16, follows Lokābhilāṣita, precedes Supūjita.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु).—mfn. (-truḥ-truḥ-tru) Victorious, triumphant. m.

(-truḥ) The father Ajita, the 2nd Jaina saint. E. jita, and śatru a foe: see other similar compounds, jitāmitra, jitāri, &c. jitaḥ śatruḥ yena .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु):—[=jita-śatru] [from jita > ji] m. ‘= tāmitra’, Name of a Buddha, [Lalita-vistara i, 77]

2) [v.s. ...] of a king, [Jaina literature] (e.g. [Hemacandra’s Pariśiṣṭaparvan iii, 45; xiii, 181])

3) [v.s. ...] of the father of the Arhat A-jita, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु):—[jita-śatru] (truḥ) 2. m. The father of Ajita. a. Victorious.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु):—(jita + śatru)

1) adj. der seine Feinde besiegt hat.

2) m. Nomen proprium eines Buddha [Rgva tch’er rol pa ed. Calc. 5, 21.] des Vaters Ajita's, des 2ten Arhant's der gegenwärtigen Avasarpiṇī, [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 36.]

--- OR ---

Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु):—

2) [Weber’s Indische Studien 10, 259.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Jitaśatru (जितशत्रु):—m. Nomen proprium —

1) eines Buddha. —

2) verschiedener Fürsten [Hemacandra's Pariśiṣṭaparvan 3,45.13,181.] —

3) *des Vaters des Arhant Ajita.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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