Grathana: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Grathana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Grathana (ग्रथन, “assembling”) refers to ‘convergence’ of the main issues of the plot. Grathana represents one of the fourteen nirvahaṇasandhi, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 21. Nirvahaṇasandhi refers to the “segments (sandhi) of the concluding part (nirvahaṇa)” and represents one of the five segments of the plot (itivṛtta or vastu) of a dramatic composition (nāṭaka).

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

Grathana (ग्रथन).—One of the fourteen elements of the ‘concluding segment’ (nirvahaṇasandhi);—(Description:) Intimation of the various aspects of the Action is called Assembling (grathana).

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Shodhganga: Mantra-sādhana: Chapter One of the Kakṣapuṭatantra

Grathana (ग्रथन) or Grathita refers to one of the eleven methods used with certain types of saptopāya (seven means) according to the 11th-century Netratantroddyota (v 18.10-12). According to the 10th-century Kakṣapuṭatantra verses 1.89-91, the method called saptopāya (seven means) should be performed when a mantra has had no effect. Among the saptopāya, the drāvaṇa, bodhana, poṣaya, śoṣaṇa, and dahanīya use a bīja, and attach it to the mantra. Kṣemarājaʼs commentary on the Netratantra (the Netratantroddyota) verses 18.10-12 gives a detailed account of 11 methods to tie a bīja to a mantra (for example, Grathana).

The Grathana is used in the drāvaṇa. According to Kṣemarāja, the Grathana is the method to place a bīja before and after each akṣara. Taking “oṃ śivāya namaḥ” for example, one should insert Varuṇaʼs bīja “vaṃ” before and after each akṣara; a, u, ma, śa, i, , a, ya, na, ma, and ha.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Grathana (ग्रथन) means “coming together”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Raudrī is the locus of the coming together (grathana) of Kula, which is realisation (pratyaya) and the restraint (of impurity brought about by the gracious) Gaze of the Lion. (She is) the intense form of the Command (tīvrājñā), the radiant energy (tejas) of the Siddhas, which is the Teaching of the Lion (imparted) by means of the oneness (samarasa of all the energies).

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

grathana (ग्रथन).—n Stringing, tying together.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Grathana (ग्रथन).—

1) Coagulation, thickening, becoming obstructed or clogged with knotty lumps.

2) Stringing together.

3) Composing, writing; ( also in these senses).

Derivable forms: grathanam (ग्रथनम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Grathana (ग्रथन).—[neuter] ā [feminine] tying, binding, connecting.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Grathana (ग्रथन):—[from granth] n. tying, binding-stringing together, [Nyāyamālā-vistara [Scholiast or Commentator]]

2) [v.s. ...] thickening, becoming obstructed or clogged with knotty lumps, [Suśruta ii, 11, 19]

3) [v.s. ...] (in [dramatic language]) intimation of the issue of a plot, [Daśarūpa i, 51; Sāhitya-darpaṇa vi, 110; Pratāparudrīya]

4) Grathanā (ग्रथना):—[from grathana > granth] f. tying, binding, ensnaring, [Bālarāmāyaṇa vi, 48/49.]

[Sanskrit to German]

Grathana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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