Gomeda, aka: Go-meda; 4 Definition(s)

Introduction

Gomeda means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Gomeda (गोमेद, “Hessonite”):—One of the nine gems (navaratna) according to the 13th century Rasaprakāśasudhākara. When its colour is similar to gomedas (cow’s fat) or similar to very clear cow’s urine, it is considered as śuddha or of superior quality.

The Hessonite (gomeda) has Pharmaco-therapeutic properties and possesses the following characteristics:

  • It pacifys pitta-doṣa,
  • destroys kapha-doṣa, pāṇḍuroga and kṣaya-roga,
  • stimulates digestive fire,
  • acts as a good digestive (appatizer),
  • produces relishness (rūci)
  • and promotes intelligence to great extent

Superior: When the Hessonite is possessed of the following characteristics, it is considered superior: Bright shining, greasy appearance, free from dalas (layers/scales), smooth on touch, having the shade similar to clear cow’s urine, clear inlook, sama (uneven) on surface. When containing these characteristics, the Gomeda is considered garīya (of best quality) and may be used for all purposes.

Inferior: The Hessonite is considered inferior when it exhibits the following traits: Does not contain proper shade, flat, without shining, having dry surface, small in size, containing scales/layers, light in weight and similar to pīta-kāca (yellow glass).

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Purana

Gomeda in Purana glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

1a) Gomeda (गोमेद).—Mt. one of the seven hills of Plakṣadvīpa; gives its name to Gomedavarṣa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 19. 7, 138; Matsya-purāṇa 123. 28; Vāyu-purāṇa 49. 6; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 4. 7.

1b) Another name for the country Śāntabhayam in the Plakṣadvīpa;1 surrounding the sea of wine and surrounded by sugar-cane juice sea;2 encircles the Kumuda hill.3

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 19. 15.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 123. 1-4; 124. 50.
  • 3) Ib. 123. 7.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Gomeda (गोमेद) refers to one of the seven continents (saptadvīpa) situated within the world of the earth (pṛthivī), according to Parākhyatantra 5.61. It is also known as Gomedadvīpa. These continents are located above the seven pātālas and may contain even more sub-continents within them, are round in shape, and are encircled within seven concentric oceans.

According to the Parākhya-tantra, “beyond that is the continent Gomedas, where, because of the curse of Gautama, a hundred cows were killed, and there then flowed fat: becauseof the profusion of that fat the continent got its name. Outside that is the ocean of liquor which reeks of the perfume of the blood of gods, intoxicated by which Vidyādharas and Gandharvas revel”.

The Parākhyatantra is an old Śaiva-siddhānta tantra dating from before the 10th century.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gomeda (गोमेद).—a gem brought from the Himālaya and Indus, described as of four different colours:-white, pale-yellow, red, and dark-blue.

Derivable forms: gomedaḥ (गोमेदः).

Gomeda is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms go and meda (मेद).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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