Durita, Dur-ita: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Durita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (vaishnavism)

Durita (दुरित) refers to the “stench of sins”, according to the Vedānta Deśika’s Yatirājasaptati.—There are allusions to Rāmānuja’s “protection” of the Vedas, his defeat of those who hold other Vedāntic views as well as the significance of his establishment of the right interpretation of the Vedas in innumerable verses of the Yatirājasaptati. [...] Verse 31 captures in a lovely set of images the nature of Rāmānuja’s works.They are wish-fulfilling trees for the imagination of debaters, oozing with the nectar of Hari’s feet, possessing many branches so that they can remove suffering/heat, and subduing (with their perfume) the stench of sins (durita-gandha).

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Ganitashastra (Mathematics and Algebra)

Source: archive.org: Hindu Mathematics

Durita (दुरित) represents the number 8 (eight) in the “word-numeral system” (bhūtasaṃkhyā), which was used in Sanskrit texts dealing with astronomy, mathematics, metrics, as well as in the dates of inscriptions and manuscripts in ancient Indian literature.—A system of expressing numbers by means of words arranged as in the place-value notation was developed and perfected in India in the early centuries of the Christian era. In this system the numerals [e.g., 8—durita] are expressed by names of things, beings or concepts, which, naturally or in accordance with the teaching of the Śāstras, connote numbers.

Ganitashastra book cover
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Ganitashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, gaṇitaśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science of mathematics, algebra, number theory, arithmetic, etc. Closely allied with astronomy, both were commonly taught and studied in universities, even since the 1st millennium BCE. Ganita-shastra also includes ritualistic math-books such as the Shulba-sutras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Durita (दुरित) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Durita] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Durita (दुरित) refers to the “sinful (Karma)”, according to the Yaśastilaka Campū verse 2.215-216.—Accordingly, “The Self is by nature deathless and without any beginning, endowed with bliss and infinite power, and luminous and pure. The powerful flames of sinful Karma (durita-agni) heat it, like mercury, after lodging it in the body. Under the intoxicating power of Karma, even a man of superior merit goes reeling down to unhappy births. Se [sic] let the wise, who know the cardinal difference between the body and the Self, strive for the bliss that is free from rebirth”.

Synonyms: Pāpa, Kalmaṣa.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Durita.—(SITI), famine; disturbance. Note: durita is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

durita : (nt.) sin; bad action.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

durita (दुरित).—n S Sinfulness or sin: also attrib. sinful.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

durita (दुरित).—n Sinfulness or sin.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Durita (दुरित).—a.

1) difficult.

2) sinful. (-tam) 1 a bad course, evil, sin; दरिद्राणां दैन्यं दुरितमथ दुर्वासनहृदां द्रुतं दूरीकुर्वन् (daridrāṇāṃ dainyaṃ duritamatha durvāsanahṛdāṃ drutaṃ dūrīkurvan) G. L.2; R.8.2; Amaruśataka 2; Mv.3.43.

2) a difficulty, danger.

3) a calamity, evil; अपत्ये यत्तादृग्- दुरितमभवत् (apatye yattādṛg- duritamabhavat) Uttararāmacarita 4.3.

Durita is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dur and ita (इत).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durita (दुरित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) Sinful, wicked. n.

(-taṃ) Sin. E. dur vile, bad, and ita gone, become. duṣṭam itam gamanam asmāt .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durita (दुरित).—(durita) [neuter] difficulty, danger, distress, damage, discomfort, evil, sin; adj. difficult, evil, bad, sinful, wicked.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Durita (दुरित):—[=dur-ita] [from dur] n. (dur-, [Ṛg-veda i, 125, 7]) bad course, difficulty, danger. discomfort, evil, sin (also personified), [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda; Harivaṃśa; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] mfn. difficult, bad, [Atharva-veda xii, 2, 28]

3) [v.s. ...] wicked, sinful, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durita (दुरित):—(taṃ) 1. n. Sin. a. Sinful.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Durita (दुरित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Duria.

[Sanskrit to German]

Durita in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Durita (ದುರಿತ):—

1) [noun] transgression of divine law; any act regarded as a transgression, esp. a wilful or deliberate violation of some religious or moral principle; a sin.

2) [noun] anything that causes harm, pain, misery, etc.

3) [noun] (arith.) a symbol for the number eight.

4) [noun] ದುರಿತವನ್ನು ಉರಿಸುವುದಕ್ಕಾಗುವುದೇ [duritavannu urisuvudakkaguvude]? duritavannu urisuvudakkāguvudē (prov.) one cannot wash off his sins by propitiation.

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Dūrita (ದೂರಿತ):—[noun] a man who is away from.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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