Dharin, Dhārin, Dhari: 26 definitions

Introduction:

Dharin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Dharin [धारिन्] in the Sanskrit language is the name of a plant identified with Salvadora persica L. from the Salvadoraceae (Salvadora) family. For the possible medicinal usage of dharin, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Dhari [ଧାରୀ] in the Odia language is the name of a plant identified with Salvadora persica L. from the Salvadoraceae (Salvadora) family. For the possible medicinal usage of dhari, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Dhāri (धारि):—The one that prevents the body from decay, a synonym of ayu

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Dhārin (धारिन्) refers to “one who wears”, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “Or else, (he may be an ascetic who) always lives in a cave and eats roots, wears bark clothes [i.e., valkalāmbara-dhārin], keeps silence and is firm (in the observance of his ascetic’s) vow; whether he has dreadlocks or shaved head, he is ever intent on the practice of chastity. He knows the reality of concentration and meditation and does not keep the company of the worldly(-minded). [...]”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Dhārin (धारिन्) (Cf. Dhāriṇī) refers to “one who carries (attributes in one’s hand)”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] I take refuge with the goddesses of becoming minute and other great accomplishments for the sake of success. They hold wish-fulfilling jewels in both hands. They are moon-crested, three-eyed, and red in complexion. I revere Brahmāṇī and the other mother-goddesses. They carry a skull-bowl and red lily in their hands (dhāriṇīkapālotpaladhāriṇī), their bodies are dark-colored like the leaves of bamboo, and they are clad in lovely [red] clothes resembling bandhūka flowers. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Dhārin (धारिन्) (Cf. Dhāriṇī) refers to “one who supports” (a particular system of philosophy), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.13 (“Śiva-Pārvatī dialogue”).—Accordingly, as Śiva said to Pārvatī: “O Pārvatī, O upholder of the Sāṃkhya system [i.e., sāṅkhya-dhāriṇī], if you say so, O sweet-voiced lady, you render me unforbidden service every day. If I am the Brahman, the supreme lord, unsullied by illusion, comprehensible through spiritual knowledge and the master of illusion what will you do then?”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Dhārin (धारिन्) refers to “one wearing (a dress)”, according to the Guhyasūtra chapter 9.—Accordingly, “[...] [The Lord spoke]:—Wearing half the dress of a woman (ardhastrī-veśa-dhārin) and half [that of] a man, on one half, he should place [feminine] tresses, on one half, he should wear matted locks. On one half, there should be a forehead mark; on one half a [forehead] eye. A ring [should be] in one ear; a [pendant] ear-ornament in one ear. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

dhari : (aor. of dharati) lasted; continued; lived.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Dhārin, (adj.—°) (Sk. dhārin, see dhāreti & cp. °dhara, °dhāra) holding, wearing, keeping; often in phrase antimadeha° “wearing the last body” (of an Arahant) S.I, 14; Sn.471; It.32, 40.—J.I, 47 (virūpa-vesa°); Dāvs.V, 15.—f. °inī Pv.I, 108 (kāsikuttama°). (Page 341)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Dhārī (धारी).—f ( H) A narrow border or a colored strip along a cloth.

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dhārī (धारी).—a S That assumes or takes. In comp. as rūpadhārī, yajñōpavītadhārī, avatāradhārī, daṇḍadhārī.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

Dhārī (धारी).—f A narrow border of a coloured strip along a cloth.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dhārin (धारिन्).—a. (-ṇī f.) [धृ-णिनि (dhṛ-ṇini)]

1) Carrying, bearing, sustaining, preserving, having, holding, supporting; पादाम्भोरुहधारि (pādāmbhoruhadhāri) Gīt.12; कर° (kara°) &c.

2) Keeping in one's memory, possessed of retentive memory; अज्ञेभ्यो ग्रन्थिनः श्रेष्ठा ग्रन्थिभ्यो धारिणो वराः (ajñebhyo granthinaḥ śreṣṭhā granthibhyo dhāriṇo varāḥ) Ms.12.13.

3) Edged, observing, doing; यज्ञधारी च सततम् (yajñadhārī ca satatam) Mb.12.34.1.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhārin (धारिन्).—mfn. (-rī-riṇī-ri) 1. Having, holding, keeping, possessing. 2. Edged. m. (-rī) A sort of tree: see pīlu. E. dhārā an edge, &c. ṇini aff. or dhāraṃ ṛṇaṃ śīdhyatvena asti asya . strīyāṃ ṅīp .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhārin (धारिन्).—i. e. dhṛ + in, adj., f. iṇī. 1. Bearing, Mahābhārata 13, 4350. 2. Having, [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 12, 41. 3. Knowing, Kāthas. 13, 20. 4. Maintaining, Mahābhārata 1, 2596. 5. Keeping. nyāsa-, A depositary, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 8, 196. 6. Retaining (what one has read), [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 12, 103. 7. Observing, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 1, 35.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhāri (धारि).—[adjective] holding, bearing (—°).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhārin (धारिन्).—1. [adjective] holding, bearing, wearing, possessing, keeping (also in one’s memory), retaining, supporting, observing. [feminine] ṇī the earth, a woman’s name.

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Dhārin (धारिन्).—2. [adjective] streaming.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhāri (धारि):—[from dhāra] mfn. holding, bearing [Scholiast or Commentator]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dhārin (धारिन्):—[from dhāra] 1. dhārin mfn. bearing, wearing, holding, possessing, keeping in one’s memory, maintaining, observing (with [genitive case] or ifc.), [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] = poṣka (?), [Harivaṃśa 11986] ([Nīlakaṇṭha])

3) [v.s. ...] m. Careya Arborea or Salvadora Persica, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhārin (धारिन्):—(rī) 5. m. A sort of tree.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Dhārin (धारिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Dhāri.

[Sanskrit to German]

Dharin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Dhārī (धारी):—(nf) a stripe; line; an adjectival suffix meaning one who or that which holds/supports/possesses/maintains/wears; ~[dāra] striped, striate.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Dhāri (धारि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Dhārin.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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