Sanskrit quote nr. 33 (Maha-subhashita-samgraha)

Sanskrit text:

अकलियुगमखर्वमत्र हृद्यं व्यचरदपापघनो यतः कुटुम्बी ।
मम रुचिरिह लक्ष्मणाग्रजेन प्रभवति शर्मदशास्यमर्देन ॥

akaliyugamakharvamatra hṛdyaṃ vyacaradapāpaghano yataḥ kuṭumbī |
mama ruciriha lakṣmaṇāgrajena prabhavati śarmadaśāsyamardena ||

⏑⏑⏑¦⏑⏑⏑¦⎼⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⎼¦¦⏑⏑⏑¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⎼⏑¦⎼⏑⎼¦⎼¦¦
⏑⏑⏑¦⏑⎼⏑¦⏑⎼⏑¦⎼⏑⎼¦⎼¦¦⏑⏑⏑¦⏑⏑⏑¦⎼⏑⎼¦⏑⎼⎼¦¦

Meter name: Puṣpitāgrā; Type: Akṣaracchanda (ardhasama); First and third pādas: 12 syllables; Second and fourth pādas: 13 syllables

Primary English translation:

“My interest is in the elder brother of Lakṣmaṇa (Rāma) who destroyed the ten-faced monster (Rāvaṇa) by which happiness will come in as much as he led a householder’s life, resplendent without any sin attached, pleasing and full as if it were not the kaliyuga (iron age).”

(translation by A. A. Ramanathan)

Index

  1. Introduction
  2. Glossary of terms
  3. Analysis of Sanskrit grammar
  4. Sources
  5. Authorship
  6. About the Mahāsubhāṣitasaṃgraha

Presented above is a Sanskrit aphorism, also known as a subhāṣita, which is at the very least, a literary piece of art. This page provides critical research material such as an anlaysis on the poetic meter used, an English translation, a glossary explaining technical terms, and a list of resources including print editions and digital links.

Glossary of Sanskrit terms

Note: Consider this as an approximate extraction of glossary words based on an experimental segmentation of the Sanskrit verse. Some could be superfluous while some might not be mentioned.

Akali (अकलि): defined in 1 categories.
Yuga (युग): defined in 8 categories.
Atra (अत्र): defined in 3 categories.
Hridya (hrdya, hṛdya, हृद्य): defined in 4 categories.
Rada (रद): defined in 3 categories.
Papa (pāpa, पाप): defined in 5 categories.
Ghana (घन): defined in 11 categories.
Yat (यत्): defined in 2 categories.
Yata (यत): defined in 4 categories.
Kutumbin (kuṭumbin, कुटुम्बिन्): defined in 1 categories.
Asmad (अस्मद्): defined in 2 categories.
Ruci (रुचि): defined in 5 categories.
Lakshmana (laksmana, lakṣmaṇa, लक्ष्मण, lakṣmaṇā, लक्ष्मणा): defined in 9 categories.
Lakshman (laksman, lakṣman, लक्ष्मन्): defined in 1 categories.
Agraja (अग्रज): defined in 2 categories.
Prabhavat (प्रभवत्): defined in 1 categories.
Shasya (sasya, śāsya, शास्य): defined in 3 categories.
Ina (इन): defined in 4 categories.

Defined according to the following glossaries/dictionaries: Marathi, Buddhism, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Pali, Purana, Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology), Dharmashastra (religious law), Ayurveda (science of life), Jainism, Tibetan Buddhism, Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy), Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar), Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism), Theravada (major branch of Buddhism), Itihasa (narrative history), Katha (narrative stories), Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy), India history

Analysis of Sanskrit grammar

Note: this is an experimental feature and only shows the first possible analysis of the Sanskrit verse. If the system was successful in segmenting the sentence, you will see of which words it is made up of, generally consisting of Nouns, Pronouns, Verbs, Participles and Indeclinables. Click on the link to show all possible derivations of the word.

  • Line 1: “akaliyugamakharvamatra hṛdyaṃ vyacaradapāpaghano yataḥ kuṭumbī”
  • akali -
  • akali (noun, masculine); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    (adverb)
    akali (noun, neuter); (5 der.)
    (compound)
    (adverb)
    akali (nominative single)
    akali (vocative single)
    akali (accusative single)
    akali (noun, feminine); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    (adverb)
  • yugam -
  • yuga (noun, neuter); (3 der.)
    yugam (adverb)
    yugam (nominative single)
    yugam (accusative single)
  • akharvam -
  • akharva (noun, masculine); (2 der.)
    akharvam (adverb)
    akharvam (accusative single)
    akharva (noun, neuter); (3 der.)
    akharvam (adverb)
    akharvam (nominative single)
    akharvam (accusative single)
    akharvā (noun, feminine); (1 der.)
    akharvam (adverb)
    akharvan (noun, masculine); (1 der.)
    akharvam (adverb)
    akharvan (noun, neuter); (1 der.)
    akharvam (adverb)
    kharv (verb class 1); (1 der.)
    akharvam (imperfect active first single)
  • atra -
  • atra (indeclinable adverb); (1 der.)
    (indeclinable adverb)
    atra (noun, masculine); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    atra (vocative single)
    atra (noun, neuter); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    atra (vocative single)
  • hṛdyam -
  • hṛdya (noun, masculine); (2 der.)
    hṛdyam (adverb)
    hṛdyam (accusative single)
    hṛdya (noun, neuter); (3 der.)
    hṛdyam (adverb)
    hṛdyam (nominative single)
    hṛdyam (accusative single)
    hṛdyā (noun, feminine); (1 der.)
    hṛdyam (adverb)
  • vyaca -
  • vyac (verb class 6); (1 der.)
    vyaca (imperative active second single)
  • rada -
  • rada (noun, masculine); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    rada (vocative single)
    rada (noun, neuter); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    rada (vocative single)
    rad (verb class 1); (1 der.)
    rada (imperative active second single)
  • pāpa -
  • pāpa (noun, masculine); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    pāpa (vocative single)
    pāpa (noun, neuter); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    pāpa (vocative single)
  • ghano* -
  • ghana (noun, masculine); (1 der.)
    ghanaḥ (nominative single)
  • yataḥ -
  • yataḥ (indeclinable relative); (1 der.)
    (indeclinable relative)
    yataḥ (indeclinable); (1 der.)
    (indeclinable)
    yat (noun, masculine); (3 der.)
    yataḥ (accusative plural)
    yataḥ (ablative single)
    yataḥ (genitive single)
    yat (noun, neuter); (2 der.)
    yataḥ (ablative single)
    yataḥ (genitive single)
    yata (noun, masculine); (1 der.)
    yataḥ (nominative single)
    i -> yat (participle, masculine); (3 der.)
    yataḥ (accusative plural), from √i (class 2 verb)
    yataḥ (ablative single), from √i (class 2 verb)
    yataḥ (genitive single), from √i (class 2 verb)
    i -> yat (participle, neuter); (2 der.)
    yataḥ (ablative single), from √i (class 2 verb)
    yataḥ (genitive single), from √i (class 2 verb)
    yam -> yata (participle, masculine); (1 der.)
    yataḥ (nominative single), from √yam (class 1 verb)
  • kuṭumbī -
  • kuṭumbin (noun, masculine); (1 der.)
    kuṭumbī (nominative single)
  • Line 2: “mama ruciriha lakṣmaṇāgrajena prabhavati śarmadaśāsyamardena”
  • mama -
  • asmad (pronoun, none); (1 der.)
    mama (genitive single)
    (verb class 2); (1 der.)
    mama (perfect active second plural)
    (verb class 3); (1 der.)
    mama (perfect active second plural)
    (verb class 4); (1 der.)
    mama (perfect active second plural)
    (verb class 1); (1 der.)
    mama (perfect active second plural)
  • rucir -
  • ruci (noun, feminine); (1 der.)
    ruciḥ (nominative single)
    ruci (noun, masculine); (1 der.)
    ruciḥ (nominative single)
  • iha -
  • iha (indeclinable adverb); (1 der.)
    (indeclinable adverb)
    iha (indeclinable); (1 der.)
    (indeclinable)
  • lakṣmaṇā -
  • lakṣmaṇa (noun, masculine); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    lakṣmaṇa (vocative single)
    lakṣmaṇa (noun, neuter); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    lakṣmaṇa (vocative single)
    lakṣmaṇā (noun, feminine); (2 der.)
    lakṣmaṇā (nominative single)
    lakṣmaṇā (nominative single)
    lakṣman (noun, neuter); (2 der.)
    lakṣmaṇā (instrumental single)
    lakṣmaṇā (instrumental single)
  • agrajena -
  • agraja (noun, masculine); (1 der.)
    agrajena (instrumental single)
    agraja (noun, neuter); (1 der.)
    agrajena (instrumental single)
  • prabhavati -
  • prabhavat (noun, masculine); (1 der.)
    prabhavati (locative single)
    prabhavat (noun, neuter); (1 der.)
    prabhavati (locative single)
  • śarmada -
  • śarmada (noun, masculine); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    śarmada (vocative single)
    śarmada (noun, neuter); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    śarmada (vocative single)
  • śāsyam -
  • śāsya (noun, masculine); (2 der.)
    śāsyam (adverb)
    śāsyam (accusative single)
    śāsya (noun, neuter); (3 der.)
    śāsyam (adverb)
    śāsyam (nominative single)
    śāsyam (accusative single)
    śāsyā (noun, feminine); (1 der.)
    śāsyam (adverb)
    śās -> śāsya (participle, masculine); (1 der.)
    śāsyam (accusative single), from √śās (class 2 verb)
    śās -> śāsya (participle, neuter); (2 der.)
    śāsyam (nominative single), from √śās (class 2 verb)
    śāsyam (accusative single), from √śās (class 2 verb)
    śas -> śāsya (participle, masculine); (1 der.)
    śāsyam (accusative single), from √śas (class 1 verb)
    śas -> śāsya (participle, neuter); (2 der.)
    śāsyam (nominative single), from √śas (class 1 verb)
    śāsyam (accusative single), from √śas (class 1 verb)
  • arde -
  • ard (verb class 1); (1 der.)
    arda (imperative active second single)
    ard (verb class 6); (1 der.)
    arda (imperative active second single)
  • ina -
  • ina (noun, masculine); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    ina (vocative single)
    ina (noun, neuter); (2 der.)
    (compound)
    ina (vocative single)

Sources

This quote is contained within the following Sanskrit literary sources:

Rasikarañjana 5: Literally, ‘the delight of the rasikas’. This is a poetic text characterised by enantiosemy (a word with multiple antonimical meanings). It is a relatively short work consisting of 17 prakaraṇas (chapters). The verses are composed in a variety of different meters. The book was written by Rāmacandra in 1524.
More info

Authorship

Rāmacandra (16th century) is the author of the Rasikarañjana. Author of various Sanskrit poetic works. He is known for his praise of King Vīrasiṃhadeva (1500-1540) in his Sūktisundara. He was the son of Lakṣmaṇabhaṭṭa. He was also known as Rāmacandrabhaṭṭa.

About the Mahāsubhāṣitasaṃgraha

This quote is included within the Mahāsubhāṣitasaṃgraha (महासुभाषितसंग्रह, maha-subhashita-samgraha / subhasita-sangraha), which is a compendium of Sanskrit aphorisms (subhāṣita), collected from various sources. Subhāṣita is a genre of Sanskrit literature, exposing the vast and rich cultural heritage of ancient India.

It has serial number 33 and can be found on page 6. (read on archive.org)

Sanskrit is the oldest living language and bears testimony to the intellectual past of ancient India. Three major religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) share this language, which is used for many of their holy books. Besides religious manuscripts, much of India’s ancient culture has been preserved in Sanskrit, covering topics such as Architecture, Music, Botany, Surgery, Ethics, Philosophy, Dance and much more.

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