Vyoman: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Vyoman means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Vyoman (व्योमन्) refers to the “void”, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “Mālinī of the Void (vyoman) abides (both) as one and as many divisions (vibhāga). The End of the Twelve is the Void which (is the abode of Mālinī that, as) the Self, is the nectar (Mālinī showers down below). (Thus Mālinī) resides in the midst of the ocean of nectar and, residing in the movement (cāra) (of the vital breath), she is the one who impels (its) motion (cāravāhinī). 'Movement' is said to be the activity of the vital breath (prāṇagati). Thus she who, residing there, impels (it, is said to be) the one who impels (its) motion (cāravāhinī)”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Himalayan Academy: Kamika Agama Purva Pada

Vyoman (व्योमन्) (Cf. Gagana) refers to “ākāśa (tattva)”, according to the Kāmikāgama Pūrvabhāga chapter 4 (“Directions for the Daily Worship of Lord Śiva”) verse 74-76 [alternatively, chapter 6 verses 74-76].—Accordingly, “[...] The pṛthvītattva (earth) [pārthiva] is located in the heart; jalatattva [āpya], in the neck; agnitattva [vāhneya], at the root of uvula; vāyutattva [vāyu], at the mid-point of the two eyebrows; ākāśatattva [vyomanvyoman-sthāna], in the brahmarandhra. Or, the location of these tattvas may be contemplated in a different way. The pṛthvītattva [pṛthivī] is from the feet to the knee; the jalatattva [āpya] is from the knee to navel; the agnitattva [anala] is from the navel to the neck; the vāyutattva [vāyura] is from the neck to the top of the face. The ākāśatattva [gaganagagana-sthāna] is located above this. Such locations are told for the purpose of dhāraṇa-practice”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Vyoman (व्योमन्) refers to the “sky”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 3), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “The dark spots, also known as ketus, the sons of Rāhu are Tāmasa, Kīlaka and the like, and are 33 in number. How they affect the earth depends upon their color, position and shape. [...] When the spots appear on the solar disc the waters will get disturbed; the sky [i.e., vyoman] will be filled with dust; high winds capable of breaking down the tops of mountains and of trees, will carry pebbles and sand along their course”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Vyoman (व्योमन्) refers to the “sky”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.6.—Accordingly, after the Gods eulogised Goddess Śivā who resided in the womb of Menā:—“[...] Vidyādhara women and the celestial nymphs danced in the sky [i.e., vyoman]; in the heavenly region great festivities were celebrated by the gods and others. At that time Śivā, Satī of perfect power formerly appeared in front of Menā in her real form. She was born at midnight when the constellation Mṛgaśiras was in conjunction with the moon on the ninth day in the month of Madhu (March-April) in the spring season like the Gaṅgā from the moon’s sphere. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Vyoman.—(IE 7-1-2; EI 33), ‘cypher’. Note: vyoman is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vyoman (व्योमन्).—n. [vye-manin pṛṣo° Uṇādi-sūtra 4.15]

1) The sky, atmosphere; अस्त्वेवं जडधामता तु भवतो यद् व्योम्नि विस्फूर्जसे (astvevaṃ jaḍadhāmatā tu bhavato yad vyomni visphūrjase) K. P.1; Meghadūta 53; R.12.67; N.22.54.

2) Waret.

3) A temple sacred to the sun.

4) Talc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyoman (व्योमन्).—n. (-ma) 1. Sky, heaven, atmosphere. 2. Water. 3. A temple, sacred to the sun, or place where he is especially worshipped. 4. Talc. E. vyeñ to cover, Unadi aff. manin, form irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyoman (व्योमन्).—n. 1. The sky, atmosphere, heaven, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 21; [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 20. 2. Æther, Bhāṣāp. 2. 3. Water. 4. A temple sacred to the sun.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyoman (व्योमन्).—[neuter] heaven, sky, air; [instrumental] vyomamārgeṇa & vartmanā through the air.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vyoman (व्योमन्):—[=vy-oman] [from vy] 1. vy-oman mfn. (for 2. See sub voce) one who cannot be saved (?), [Kāṭhaka]

2) 2. vyoman m. (for 1. See p. 1029, col. 1; [according to] to [Uṇādi-sūtra iv, 150] [from] √vye [according to] to others [from] vi-√av or √ve) heaven, sky, atmosphere, air (vyomnā, vyoma-mārgeṇa or -vartmanā, ‘through the air’), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

3) space, [Kapila]

4) ether (as an element), [Kāvya literature; Purāṇa; Suśruta]

5) wind or air (of the body), [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

6) water, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) talc, mica, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) a temple sacred to the sun, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) a [particular] high number, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) the 10th [astrology] mansion, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

11) preservation, welfare, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā] (= rakṣaṇa [Scholiast or Commentator])

12) m. a [particular] Ekāha, [???]

13) Name of Prajā-pati or the Year (personified), [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā] ([Mahīdhara])

14) of Viṣṇu, [Viṣṇu-smṛti, viṣṇu-sūtra, vaiṣṇava-dharma-śāstra]

15) of a son of Daśārha, [Harivaṃśa; Purāṇa] ([varia lectio] vyoma).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyoman (व्योमन्):—(ma) 5. n. Sky; water; temple sacred to the sun.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Vyoman (व्योमन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Voma.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vyoman in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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