Sugata, aka: Su-gata; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Sugata means something in Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Sugata (सुगत) is a synonym for the Buddha according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter IV). Su means ‘good’ and gata means either ‘to go’ or ‘speaking’ (gad). Therefore the expression means the ‘Well-gone’ or the ‘Well-spoken’.

Why is he called Sieou k’ie t’o (Sugata)?

1) The Buddha has transcended by all kinds of deep concentrations (gambhīra samādhi) and numberless great wisdoms (apramāṇā mahāprajñā). This is why he is called Sugata, well-gone.

2) He is Sugata, well-spoken, because he preaches the doctrine according to the true nature of the dharmas and without being attached to the doctrine. Taking into account the degree of wisdom (prajñābala) of his disciples, he uses every skillful means (upāya) and the power of his superknowledges (abhijñā) to convert them (parināṃa).

According to the Visuddhimagga:—“He is Sugata because his path is noble, because he goes to a good place, because his walk is correct, and because he speaks (gad) correctly”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Sugata (सुगत, “pleasing gait”) is a Prakrit name based on the beauty of the human body, mentioned as an example in the Aṅgavijjā chapter 26. This chapter includes general rules to follow when deriving proper names. The Aṅgavijjā (mentioning sugata) is an ancient treatise from the 3rd century CE dealing with physiognomic readings, bodily gestures and predictions and was written by a Jain ascetic in 9000 Prakrit stanzas.

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions (jainism)
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Sugata in Pali glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

sugata : (adj.) faring well; happy. (m.), the Buddha.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

1) Sugata, (su+gata) faring well, happy, having a happy life after death (gati): see under gata; cp. Vism. 424 (s. = sugati-gata). Freq. Ep. of the Buddha (see Dict. of Names).

—aṅgula a Buddha-inch, an inch according to the standard accepted by Buddhists Vin. IV, 168. —ālaya imitation of the Buddha J. I, 490, 491; II, 38, 148, 162; III, 112. —ovāda a discourse of the Blessed one J. I, 119, 349; II, 9, 13, 46; III, 368. —vidatthi a Buddha-span, a span of the accepted length Vin. III, 149; IV, 173. —vinaya the discipline of the Buddha A. II, 147. (Page 716)

2) Sugata.—of happy, blessed existence, fortunate; one who has attained the realm of bliss (=sugatiṃ gata, see gati), blessed. As np. a common Ep. of the Buddha: Vin.I, 35; III, 1; D.I, 49; S.I, 192; A.II, 147 et passim (see Sugata).—D.I, 83; Sn.227 (see expl. KhA 183).

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sugata (सुगत).—a.

1) well-gone or passed.

2) well-bestowed.

-taḥ an epithet of Buddha.

Sugata is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms su and gata (गत).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sugata (सुगत).—(= Pali id.), one that has attained bliss (Tibetan bde bar gśegs pa), ep. of a Buddha: Mvy 7 et passim; °ta-cīvara-gatam Mvy 8517, attaining the size of the Buddha's robe; it is a sin for a monk to have a robe of this size or larger, Vin. iv.173.21 ff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Sugata (सुगत).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Passed, gone. 2. Well-bestowed. m.

(-taḥ) A Bud'dha in general, one of the generic terms for a deified sage, and teacher of the Baud'dha sect. E. su well, and gata gone or known, (by whom.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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