Sashtha, Saṣṭhā, Shashtha, Ṣāṣṭha: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Sashtha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Saṣṭhā and Ṣāṣṭha can be transliterated into English as Sastha or Sashtha or Shashtha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Shashth.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Saṣṭhā (सष्ठा):—Name of one of the six deities which together form the third of the six groups of the aṣṭāviṃśatikrama (one of the main components in the worship of Kubjikā). This group of six deities is also referred to as ‘the auspicious six’ (anugraha-ṣaṭka) and is located in the Ghaṭasthāna. Their names are referred to in the kubjikāmata-tantra but actually described in the Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shiksha (linguistics: phonetics, phonology etc.)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śikṣā

Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ, “the sixth”) is the name of a note (svara) used by singers of the sāmas (religious songs from Sāmaveda), corresponding to the niṣāda-svara of the flute, according to the Nāradīyā-śīkṣā 1.5.1. The Nāradīyā-śīkṣā is an ancient Sanskrit treatise dealing phonetics and musicology. Its proclaimed author is the Nārada.

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Shiksha (शिक्षा, śikṣā) deals with Sanskrit linguistics and represents a branch of vedanga (vedic ancillary science). Shiksha deals with subjects such as phonetics, phonology, study of sound, letters of the Sanskrit alphabet and related topics. Much attention is also given to the study of recitation (patha) of Vedic verses.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ).—A term used in connection with the sixth of the spirants viz. the Jivhamuliya letter cf. ऋकारल्कारावथ षष्ठ ऊष्मा (ṛkāralkārāvatha ṣaṣṭha ūṣmā) R. Pr. I.18; the term is also used in the sense of the sixth vowel viz. ई. in the Rk. Pratisakhya; cf. मुख्ये परे पञ्चमषष्ठयोश्च (mukhye pare pañcamaṣaṣṭhayośca) R. Pr. II. 29.

Vyakarana book cover
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Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ) (Cf. Ṣaṣṭhīśanātha) or Ṣaṣṭhanātha is the name of a Siddha, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā..—The Kumārikākhaṇḍa refers to the place where the teachings were originally propagated as Uḍapīṭha. Here the three Siddhas, Oḍḍīśanātha, Ṣaṣṭhanātha and Mitranātha, received knowledge. As the first of these Siddhas presides over Oḍḍiyāṇa this may be taken to mean that Uḍapīṭha is a separate place. But the texts imply that the first of these three Siddhas remained where the original transmission took place, whereas Ṣaṣṭhanātha went to Pūrṇagiri and Mitranātha to Kāmarūpa, where they founded separate seats. Again, we find that the first sacred seat, which is normally said to be Oḍḍiyāna or the ‘seat of OṂ’ (oṃkārapīṭha), is also called Uḍu [Uḍupīṭha] or Oḍī [Oḍīpīṭha].

2) Ṣaṣṭhā (षष्ठा) refers to one of the Consorts of Bhairavīśa: one of the Nine Nāthas according to the Kulakaulinīmata.—The Nine Nāthas propagated the Western Transmission noted in the Kubjikā Tantras. Although each Siddha has a consort with which he shares some part of his spiritual discipline, she is not considered to be his wife. Thus, from the perspective of his identity as an initiate, he is not a householder.—Bhairavīśa is the Caryā name of this Nātha (i.e., the public name the Siddha uses when living as a wandering renouncer). His consorts are Ṣaṣṭhā and Cidrūpāmbā [Alternatively according to the Kubjikānityāhnikatilaka, Gaganāmbā and Candrāmbā].

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Jainism

Jain philosophy

Source: archive.org: Anekanta Jaya Pataka of Haribhadra Suri

Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ) (Sanskrit; in Prakrit: Chaṭṭha) refers to a kind of external penance, as occurring in the Anekāntajayapatākā-prakaraṇa, a Śvetāmbara Jain philosophical work written by Haribhadra Sūri.—[Cf. Vol. I, P. 28, l. 32]—Ṣaṣṭha (Prakrit: Chaṭṭha) and Aṣṭama (Prakrit: Atthama) are each a kind of external penance—mortification of flesh Every day one takes two meals So one who gives up one meal on the first day, two on the second and one on the third and thus gives up meals up, to the fourth, is said to be practising ‘caturtha’. Similarly one who gives up two meals on each of the two days and one meal on a previous day and one at the end, and, thus gives up meals up to the sixth, is said to be practising ‘ṣaṣṭha’. One who practises ‘aṣṭama’ gives up meals up to the eighth.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ).—a S Sixth. ṣaṣṭhī f (S) The sixth day of either half-month. 2 A form of Durga.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ).—a. (-ṣṭhī f.) Sixth, the sixth; षष्ठं तु क्षेत्रजस्यांशं प्रदद्यात् पैतृकाद्धनात् (ṣaṣṭhaṃ tu kṣetrajasyāṃśaṃ pradadyāt paitṛkāddhanāt) Manusmṛti 9.164;7.13; षष्ठे भागे (ṣaṣṭhe bhāge) V.2.1; R.17.78; षष्ठे काले मयाऽऽहारः प्राप्तोऽयमनुजस्तव (ṣaṣṭhe kāle mayā''hāraḥ prāpto'yamanujastava) Mahābhārata (Bombay) 3.18.16.

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Ṣāṣṭha (षाष्ठ).—(-ṣṭhī f.) Sixth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ).—mfn.

(-ṣṭhaḥ-ṣṭhī-ṣṭhaṃ) Sixth. f. (-ṣṭhī) 1. Durga as one of the sixteen divine mothers. 2. The sixth day of the lunar fortnight. 3. The sixth or genetive case, (in gram.) E. ṣaṣ six, ḍati aff., thuk aug.

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Ṣāṣṭha (षाष्ठ).—mfn.

(-ṣṭhaḥ-ṣṭhī-ṣṭhaṃ) Sixth. E. ṣaṣṭha the same, and aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ).—i. e. ṣaṣ + tha, I. ord. num., f. ṭhī, Sixth, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 20. Ii. f. ṭhā. 1. Durgā. 2. The sixth day of the lunar fortnight.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ).—[feminine] ī the sixth; ±kāla [masculine] the sixth hour of the day & the sixth meal-time. [feminine] ṣaṣṭhī the sixth day of a half-month; the sixth case ([grammar]).

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Sasthā (सस्था).—[Middle](A.) stand by, remain with ([locative], [with] vākye obey); stand still, stop, stay; meet (as foes); come to an end or to perfection; succeed, prosper; perish, die. [Causative] lift up, raise, strengthen, comfort ([with] ātmānam compose one’s self); fix, erect, build, establish, settle; bring on or in ([locative]); check, restrain; get through, finish, kill.

Sasthā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sa and sthā (स्था).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—a contemporary of Maṅkha. Śrīkaṇṭhacarita 25, 70.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ):—[from ṣaṣ] mf(ī)n. sixth, the sixth (with bhāga or aṃśa m. ‘a sixth part’; with or [scilicet] kāla m. ‘the sixth hour of the day, the sixth meal eaten at the end of a fast of three days’; ṣaṣṭhaṃkṛ, ‘to eat such a meal’), [Atharva-veda] etc. etc.

2) [v.s. ...] m. ([scilicet] akṣara) the sixth letter id est. the vowel ī, [Ṛgveda-prātiśākhya]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of a man = -candra, [Rājataraṅgiṇī]

4) [from ṣaṣ] n. a sixth part, [Gautama-dharma-śāstra]

5) Ṣāṣṭha (षाष्ठ):—mfn. ([from] ṣaṣṭha) the sixth (part), [Pāṇini 5-3, 50]

6) taught in the sixth (Adhyāya), [ib. viii, 1, 19 [Scholiast or Commentator]]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ):—[(ṣṭhaḥ-ṣṭhī-ṣṭhaṃ) a.] Sixth. f. (ī) Durgā; 6th day of the lunar fortnight.

2) Ṣāṣṭha (षाष्ठ):—[(ṣṭhaḥ-ṣṭhī-ṣṭhaṃ) a.] Sixth.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Chaṭṭha.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sashtha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sashtha in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Ṣaṣṭha (षष्ठ) [Also spelled shashth]:—(a) sixth.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Ṣaṣṭha (ಷಷ್ಠ):—[adjective] preceded by five others in a series; sixth.

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Ṣaṣṭha (ಷಷ್ಠ):—[noun] that which is in the sixth in a series.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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