Ranjana, Rañjana, Rañjanā, Ramjana: 22 definitions

Introduction:

Ranjana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Rañjana (रञ्जन):—Seventeenth of the eighteen Saṃskāra (special purification process). They are used to purify rasa (mercury) as per Rasaśāstra literature (Medicinal Alchemy), and are mentioned in texts such as the Rasaprakāśasudhākara. In Āyurveda, Saṃskāra refers to the “detoxification” process of metals and herbs. The Rañjana-saṃskāra is mainly used for transmutational alchemical purposes. In other words: the last ten saṃskāras are sequentially used for the ends of transmutational and elixir alchemy. Rañjana refers to the process of ‘tinting’ or coloration of the mercury by heating it tohether with ‘seeds’ (bīja) of gold, silver, copper, sulfur, muca and salt, such that the mercury takes on the natural colors of the minerals it has absorbed or swallowed.

Source: Google Books: The Alchemical Body

Rañjana, “tinting” or “coloration,” invloves the heating of mercury with “seeds” of gold, silver, copper, sulfur, mica, and salt, such that mercury takes on the natural colors of the minerals it has absorbed or swallowed.

Source: archive.org: History of Indian Science Technology (rasashastra)

Rañjana (रञ्जन, “dyeing”) represents to the fourteenth of eighteen alchemical purification processes of mercury (mahārasa, rasendra or pārada). A religio-philosophic base was given to mercury-based alchemy in India. Mercury was looked upon as the essence of God Śiva, and sulphur as that of Goddess Pārvatī.

Mercury had to undergo 18 processes (e.g., rañjana) before it could be used for transforming either metals or the human body. A combination of male and female principles (i.e. mercury and sulphur) forming cinnabar or mercuric sulphide or even of mercury and mica, was supposed to be highly potent and was therefore consumed as a Rasāyana or medicine for increasing body fluids or vitality. The earliest mention of Rasāyana was found in Āyurveda which was probably composed by 8th or 9th century BC, since it was a part of Atharvaveda, the last of the four Vedas.

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Rañjana (रञ्जन).—Son of Varūtri.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 65. 78.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: archive.org: Illustrations of Indian Music and Dance in Western Indian Style

Rañjanā (रञ्जना, “pleasing”).—Illustration of Rañjanā-śruti according to 15th century art:—The colour of her body is yellow. She holds a vīṇā with both hands. The colour of her bodice is dark-red. Her scarf is sky-blue with a black design, the lower garment is green with a black design.

The illustrations (of, for example Rañjanā) are found scattered throughout ancient Jain manuscripts from Gujarat. The descriptions of these illustrations of this citrāvalī are based on the ślokas of Vācanācārya Gaṇi Sudhākalaśa’s Saṅgītopaniṣatsāroddhāra (14th century) and Śārṅgadeva’s Saṅgītaratnākara (13th century).

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Ranjana [रांजण] in the Marathi language is the name of a plant identified with Manilkara hexandra from the Sapotaceae (Mahua) family having the following synonyms: Mimusops hexandra. For the possible medicinal usage of ranjana, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Ranjana [रांजण] in the Konkani language, ibid. previous identification.

Ranjana in the Bengali language is the name of a plant identified with Adenanthera pavonina L. from the Mimosaceae (Touch-me-not) family having the following synonyms: Adenanthera gersenii, Adenanthera polita, Corallaria parvifolia.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: 84000: Sampuṭodbhava Tantra (Emergence from Sampuṭa)

Rañjana (रञ्जन) means both “delighting someone” and “dyeing cloth, according to the Sampuṭodbhavatantra chapter 1.—Accordingly, “[...] Wisdom (prajñā) is called mother Because she gives birth to the people of the world. Wisdom is also called sister Because she betokens a dowry. Wisdom is called washer-woman Because she delights [i.e., rañjana] all beings. Accordingly, she is called rajakī. Wisdom is called daughter (duhitṛ) Because she suckles (duhana) the milk of qualities. Wisdom is called artiste On account of being moved by great compassion. [...]”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Rañjana (रञ्जन) refers to “(being) immersed” (in worldly pleasures), according to Pūjyapāda’s Sarvārthasiddhi.—Accordingly, “[...] Even if human birth is attained, a good country, a good family, keen senses, health, etc. are more and more difficult of attainment. When all these are attained, if true faith is not acquired, human birth becomes useless like the face without vision. And even after attaining this rare true faith, if anyone is immersed in worldly pleasures (rañjanaviṣayasukhe rañjanaṃ), it is like burning sandal-wood paste for the sake of ash. [...]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Ranjana in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Rañjana, (nt.) (fr. rañjati) delighting, finding pleasure, excitement DhsA. 363 (rañjan’aṭṭhena rāgo; v. l. rajano°; perhaps better to be read rajjana°). (Page 562)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

rañjana (रंजन).—n (S) Enravishing, enrapturing, delighting, diverting. 2 S Coloring, painting, dyeing. 3 Sanders or red sandalwood.

--- OR ---

rāñjaṇa (रांजण).—m A large earthen water-jar. It is sometimes of metal.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

rañjana (रंजन).—n Enravishing, delighting. Colouring.

--- OR ---

rāñjaṇa (रांजण).—m A large earthen water-jar.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Rañjana (रञ्जन).—a. (- f.)

1) Colouring, dyeing.

2) Pleasing, gratifying, delighting.

3) Exciting passion.

4) Conciliating, keeping contented.

-nam [rajyate'nena rañj-karaṇe lyuṭ]

1) Colouring, dyeing, painting.

2) Colour, dye.

3) Pleasing, delighting, keeping contented, gratifying, giving pleasure; राजा प्रजारञ्जनलब्धवर्णः (rājā prajārañjanalabdhavarṇaḥ) R.6.21; तथैव सोऽभूदन्वर्यो राजा प्रकृतिरञ्जनात् (tathaiva so'bhūdanvaryo rājā prakṛtirañjanāt) 4.12.

4) Red sandal-wood.

5) The Munja grass.

6) (In gram.) Nasalizing (a sound.).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rañjana (रञ्जन).—mn.

(-naḥ-naṃ) 1. Colouring, dyeing, painting, &c. 2. Affecting the heart, exciting passion, &c. n.

(-naṃ) Red Sandal or Sappan wood. “vakamkāṭha”. f. (-nī) 1. The Indigo plant, (Indigofera tinctoria.) 2. Bengal madder. 3. Another plant, commonly Sundarochani, (a species of Crinum.) “kamalāguṃ~ḍi iti bhāṣā .” 4. A flower, (Nyctanthes tristis.) E. rañj to colour, aff. yuc or lyuṭ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rañjana (रञ्जन).—[rañj + ana], I. m. (?), n. 1. Dyeing, colouring, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 381. 2. Conciliating, befriending, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 436 (at the end of a comp. adj.). 3. Exciting passion, delighting. Ii. n. Red sandal. Iii. f. , The indigo, and several other plants.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rañjana (रञ्जन).—[adjective] ([feminine] ī) & [neuter] = [preceding]; [neuter] also colour.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Rañjana (रञ्जन):—[from raj] mf(ī)n. colouring, dyeing (-tva n.), [Sarvadarśana-saṃgraha]

2) [v.s. ...] (ifc.) pleasing, charming, rejoicing, delighting, [Gīta-govinda] (cf. jana-rañjanī)

3) [v.s. ...] conciliating, befriending, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

4) [v.s. ...] m. Saccharum Munja, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [from raj] n. the act of colouring or dyeing, [Vāgbhaṭālaṃkāra]

6) [v.s. ...] colour, dye, paint, [Rāmāyaṇa]

7) [v.s. ...] (in gram.) nasalization, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā-prātiśākhya [Scholiast or Commentator]]

8) [v.s. ...] the act of pleasing, delighting, conciliating, giving pleasure, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

9) [v.s. ...] a [particular] game, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] red sandalwood, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] cinnabar, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Rañjana (रञ्जन):—[(naḥ-naṃ)] 1. m. n. Idem; affecting the heart. f. () Indigo plant; Nyctanthes tristis; Bengal madder. n. Red sandal wood.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Rañjana (रञ्जन) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Raṃjaṇa, Raccaṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ranjana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Raṃjaṇa (रंजण) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Rañjana.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Raṃjana (ರಂಜನ):—

1) [noun] the act of painting, adding colour or colours, etc.

2) [noun] a colour, dye or hue.

3) [noun] the act of giving joy, pleasure; a delighting.

4) [noun] joy; pleasure; delight.

5) [noun] the tree Pterocarpus santalinus of Papilionaceae family; ruby wood; rose wood.

6) [noun] the plant Eclipta prostrata ( = E. alba) of Asteraceae family.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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