Ranka, Raṅka, Ramka, Rankā, Rāṃkā: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Ranka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

1) Raṅka (रङ्क) refers to an “indigent person”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.32 (“The seven celestial sages arrive”).—Accordingly, as the Seven Sages said to Śiva: “[...] O Sadāśiva, we have become the most excellent of all people by your remembering us. Usually you never even come across the path of ambitions and aspirations of ordinary people. O lord, your vision, very difficult to be acquired, is like the fruit stooping down within the reach of the dwarf, like sight to a man born blind, like eloquency acquired by a dumb man, like the indigent (raṅka) meeting with a treasure-trove, like the lame man reaching the top of a high mountain and like the barren woman bearing a child. [...]”.

2) Raṅka (रङ्क) is the name of a Gaṇeśvara (attendant of Śiva), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.5.9 (“Śiva’s campaign”).—Accordingly, as Śiva with the Gods attacked Tripura: “[...] O great Brahmins, all the Gaṇeśvaras went to the three cities. Who can enumerate them fully? I shall mention a few. These were the important ones who were there—[e.g., Raṅka] [...]. These and other innumerable lords of Gaṇas who cannot be characterised and classified surrounded Śiva and went ahead. [...] They were capable of burning the entire world including the mobile and immobile beings, within a trice by their very thought. Surrounding Śiva, the great lord, they went ahead. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

raṅka (रंक).—m (S) A destitute or a mean person; a poor wretch; a wight. raṅka is usually coupled with the word rāva or rājā, answering to King and beggar, Noble and serf.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

raṅka (रंक).—m A destitute or a mean person; a Poor wretch.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Raṅka (रङ्क).—a.

1) Mean, poor, beggarly, wretched, miserable.

2) Slow.

-kaḥ A beggar, wretch, any hungry or half-starved being; प्रेतरङ्कः (pretaraṅkaḥ) Mālatīmādhava (Bombay) 5.16 'the famished or half-starved spirit'; रङ्कस्य नृपतेर्वापि जिह्वासौख्यं समं स्मृतम् (raṅkasya nṛpatervāpi jihvāsaukhyaṃ samaṃ smṛtam) Pañcatantra (Bombay) 1.254.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Raṅka (रङ्क).—mfn.

(-ṅkaḥ-ṅkā-ṅkaṃ) 1. Niggardly, avaricious, a miser. 2. Slow, dull. 3. Hungry. E. raki to go, aff. ac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Raṅka (रङ्क).—adj. 1. Niggardly. 2. Slow. 3. Indigent, poor a beggar, [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 12; 284.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Raṅka (रङ्क).—[masculine] starveling, beggar.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Raṅka (रङ्क):—mfn. niggardly, avaricious, [Uṇādi-sūtra iii, 40]

2) slow, dull, [ib.]

3) poor, miserable, hungry (e.g. kaṅka-raṅka, a hungry or half-starved crane), [Prabodha-candrodaya]

4) m. a beggar, starveling (preta-r), [Mālatīmādhava]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Raṅka (रङ्क):—[(ṅkaḥ-ṅkā-ṅkaṃ) a.] Niggardly; slow.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Raṅka (रङ्क) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Raṃka.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ranka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Raṃka (रंक) [Also spelled rank]:—(a) poor, indigent, pauper: (nm) a beggar, penniless person.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Raṃka (रंक) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Raṅka.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Raṃka (ರಂಕ):—[adjective] excessively or inordinately desirous of wealth, profit, etc.; avaricious; greedy.

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Raṃka (ರಂಕ):—[noun] a man who begs for living; a beggar.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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Nepali dictionary

Source: unoes: Nepali-English Dictionary

1) Raṅka (रङ्क):—adj. 1. poor; destitute; 2. miser; greedy; niggardly;

2) Rankā (रन्का):—n. → रन्को [ranko]

3) Rāṃkā (रांका):—[=राँका] n. pl. of राँको [rāṃko]

context information

Nepali is the primary language of the Nepalese people counting almost 20 million native speakers. The country of Nepal is situated in the Himalaya mountain range to the north of India.

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