Nabhas, Nabhash: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Nabhas means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Nabhas (नभस्) refers to the month of Śrāvaṇa, and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 9.84.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Nabhas (नभस्) refers to the “sky”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.6.—Accordingly, after the Gods eulogised Goddess Śivā:—“Thus eulogising, in many ways, the great goddess stationed in the womb, the gods returned to their abodes, highly delighted in their minds. When nine months were completed, in the tenth month, the goddess, the mother of the universe, bore all the states of a child in the womb in the complete form. The time was good. The planets, stars and the luminary heavenly bodies were quiet; the sky [i.e., nabhas] was clear and there was brilliance in all the quarters. [...]”.

Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Nabhas (नभस्) or Nabha is the son of Nala and the grandson of Niṣadha, according to the Vaṃśānucarita section of the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, [...] From Atithi was born Niṣadha. Nala was the son of Niṣadha and his son was Nabha. From Nabhas (Nabha) was born Candrāvaloka and from the latter was born Tārāpīḍa.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Nabhas (नभस्) refers to the “sky”, as mentioned in verse 5.1-2 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] vitalizing, refreshing, pleasing one’s stomach, satisfying, stimulating one’s intellect, thin, of indistinct taste, savoury, cold, light, (and) nectar-like (is) Ganges water [viz., gaṅgāmbu] fallen [viz., bhraṣṭa] from the sky [viz., nabhas]; (as it is), however, touched by sun, moon, and wind (in falling), it is largely dependent upon place and time so far as its wholesomeness and unwholesomeness are concerned”.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Nabhas (नभस्, “ether”) refers to one of the seventeen stages of the rise of kuṇḍalinī, according to Abhinavagupta as drawn from the Devyāyāmala.—Cf. The seventeen syllables [i.e., saptadaśākṣara] of Mantramātā.—[...] These seventeen units [are] to be arranged in as many locations along the axis of the subtle body,  [as was] clearly known to Abhinava. Thus he presents an ascending series marking the stages of the rise of Kuṇḍalinī, the highest stage of which is that of the ‘Pure Self’ heralded by the Transmental just below it. In this set-up, drawn by Abhinavagupta from the Devyāyāmala, there are seventeen stages. These are [e.g., the Ether (nabhas), ...].

Jayaratha quotes this [Devyāyāmala] Tantra as a source of [Kālasaṃkarṣiṇī’s] Vidyā consisting of seventeen syllables. As the Devyāyāmala tells us that these places are related to the recitation of mantra, we may conclude that the seventeen syllables are contemplated in these seventeen places [e.g., Ether (nabhas)]. Accordingly, the Wheel of the Self can be said to be at the end of (i.e. after) the sixteen [i.e., ṣoḍaśānta].

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Nabhas (नभस्) refers to the “firmament”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 1), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “Glory be to the Sun who is the author and the Soul of the Universe, the ornament of the firmament [i.e., nabhas] and who is enveloped in a thousand rays of the colour of molten gold. Having correctly examined the substance of the voluminous works of the sages of the past, I attempt to write a clear treatise neither too long nor too short”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Nabhas.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘cypher’. Note: nabhas is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nabhas (नभस्).—n. [nahyate medhaiḥ nah-asun bhaścāntādeśaḥ; cf. Uṇādi-sūtra 4.21]

1) The sky, atmosphere; R.5.29; नभश्च पृथिवीं चैव तुमुलो व्यनुनादयन् (nabhaśca pṛthivīṃ caiva tumulo vyanunādayan) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 1.19; वनान्तरे तोयमिति प्रधाविता निरीक्ष्य भिन्नाञ्जनसंनिभं नभः (vanāntare toyamiti pradhāvitā nirīkṣya bhinnāñjanasaṃnibhaṃ nabhaḥ) Ṛtusaṃhāra 1.11.

2) A cloud.

3) Fog, vapour.

4) Water.

5) Period of life, age. -m.

1) The rains or rainy season.

2) The nose, smell.

3) Name of the month of Śrāvaṇa (corresponding to JulyAugust), (said to be n. also in this sense); प्रत्यासन्ने नभसि दयिताजीवितालम्बनार्थी (pratyāsanne nabhasi dayitājīvitālambanārthī) Meghadūta 4; R.12.29;17.41;18.6; N.9.84; श्रावणे तु स्यान्नभाः श्रावणिकश्च सः (śrāvaṇe tu syānnabhāḥ śrāvaṇikaśca saḥ) Ak.; पञ्चमोऽयं तु संप्राप्तः नभाः श्यामनभाः शुभः (pañcamo'yaṃ tu saṃprāptaḥ nabhāḥ śyāmanabhāḥ śubhaḥ) Śiva. B.26.57.

4) The fibres in the root of the lotus.

5) A spitting-pot.-- (du.) Both the worlds, heaven and earth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nabhas (नभस्).—m.

(-bhāḥ) 1. The month Sravana, (July-August) 2. A cloud. 3. The rains, rainy season. 4. Smell. 5. The fibres in the root of the lotus. 6. A bird. 7. A grey-headed man. n.

(-bhaḥ) sky, atmosphere, ether or heaven. E. nabh to injure, to be annihilated, (at the end of the world,) Unadi affix asun, or nah to bind, and bha substituted for ha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nabhas (नभस्).—n. 1. Sky, atmosphere, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 37. 2. du. Heaven and earth, Mahābhārata 12, 13240. 3. Æther as one of the five elements, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 3, 26, 12. 4. (n. and m.) The name of a month of the rainy season (July

— August), [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 12, 29.

— Cf. [Latin] nubes, nebula; [Old High German.] nibul; [Anglo-Saxon.] ge-nip, a cloud.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nabhas (नभस्).—[neuter] mist, vapour, clouds, atmosphere, sky; a cert. month in the rainy season (*[masculine]); [dual] heaven and earth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nabhaś (नभश्):—[from nabh] in [compound] for bhas.

2) Nabhas (नभस्):—[from nabh] n. (cf. nabha) mist, clouds, vapour ([especially] of the Soma), [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] the sky or atmosphere ([dual number] heaven and earth, [Atharva-veda]), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] ether (as an element), [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

5) [v.s. ...] m. ([cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) Name of a month in the rainy season (= śrāvaṇa, July-August), [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa; Raghuvaṃśa; Suśruta]

6) [v.s. ...] the sun, [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska i, 4]

7) [v.s. ...] period of life, age, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] m. clouds, rainy season, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] the nose or smell (= ghrāṇa), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] a rope made of lotus fibres, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] a spitting-pot, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] Name of a prince (son of Nala and father of Puṇḍarīka), [Raghuvaṃśa; Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

13) [v.s. ...] cf. [Greek] νέφος, νεφέλη; [Latin] nĕbula; [Slavonic or Slavonian] nebo; [German] nëbul, nëbel, Nebel; [Anglo-Saxon] nifol, ‘dark.’

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nabhas (नभस्):—(bhāḥ) 5. m. The month Shrāvana (July-Aug.) a cloud; rains; smell; a bird. n. Sky, heaven.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Nabhas (नभस्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Ṇaha.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nabhas in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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