Mridani, Mṛdānī, Mṛḍānī: 10 definitions

Introduction:

Mridani means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Mṛdānī and Mṛḍānī can be transliterated into English as Mrdani or Mridani, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Mṛdānī (मृदानी, “the squeezing one”).—One of the names of the Goddess, Devī, who is regarded as the female principle of the divine; the embodiement of the energies of the Gods.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Mṛḍānī (मृडानी) is the name of a Goddess, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] I approach the great temple of goddess Mṛḍānī that opens to the west. It is guarded outside by Indra and the other [gods who guard the directions], and shines beautifully with utmost richness. I venerate the young elephant-faced master of Śiva’s gaṇas, the destroyer of obstacles. His lotus-hands are decorated with a noose, goad, fruit, and lotus. [...]

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Skanda-purana

Mṛḍānī (मृडानी) is another name for Pārvatī, according to the Skandapurāṇa 2.2.13 (“The Greatness of Kapoteśa and Bilveśvara”).—Accordingly: as Jaimini said to the Sages: “[...] [Dhūrjaṭi (Śiva)] went to the holy spot Kuśasthalī. He performed a very severe penance near Nīla mountain. [...] By the power of his penance that holy spot became one comparable to Vṛndāvana, the forest near Gokula. [...] It was full of different kinds of flocks of birds. It was a comfortable place of resort for all creatures. Since by means of his penance Śiva became (small) like a dove, he came to be called Kapoteśvara at the behest of Murāri (Viṣṇu). It is at his bidding that the Three-eyed Lord always stays here along with Mṛḍānī (Pārvatī)”.

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mṛḍānī (मृडानी) is another name for Śivā: the Goddess-counterpart of Śiva who incarnated first as Satī and then Pārvatī, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.16:—“[...] the great goddess Śivā is of the three natures. Śivā became Satī and Śiva married her. At the sacrifice of her father she cast off her body which she did not take again and went back to her own region. Śivā incarnated as Pārvatī at the request of the Devas. It was after performing a severe penance that she could attain Śiva again. Śivā came to be called by various names [such as Mṛḍānī,...]. These various names confer worldly pleasures and salvation according to qualities and action. The name Pārvatī is very common.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mṛḍānī (मृडानी).—An epithet of Pārvatī; शङ्के सुन्दरि कालकूटमपिबत् मूढो मृडानीपतिः (śaṅke sundari kālakūṭamapibat mūḍho mṛḍānīpatiḥ) Gītagovinda 12.

See also (synonyms): mṛḍā, mṛḍī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mṛḍānī (मृडानी).—[feminine] Mṛḍa’s wife, i.e. Pārvatī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mṛḍānī (मृडानी):—[from mṛḍa > mṛḍ] f. ‘wife of Mṛḍa or Śiva’, Name of Parvatī, [Kathāsaritsāgara]

2) Mṛdānī (मृदानी):—[wrong reading] for mṛḍānī.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mridani in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mṛḍāni (ಮೃಡಾನಿ):—[noun] Pārvati, the wife of Śiva.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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