Mandita, Maṇḍita, Maṇḍitā, Mamdita: 21 definitions

Introduction:

Mandita means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: OpenEdition books: Architectural terms contained in Ajitāgama and Rauravāgama

Maṇḍitā (मण्डिता) refers to “same use as maṇḍa §§ 3.19; 4.14, 18, 20.”.—(For paragraphs cf. Les enseignements architecturaux de l'Ajitāgama et du Rauravāgama by Bruno Dagens)

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Maṇḍita (मण्डित) refers to a “adorned” (viz., one adorned with matted hair and crown), according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, as Bhadrakālī said to Śrīkaṇṭha: “[...] O Śaṃkara, you also displayed this, one of your forms. Thus, O lord Śaṃkara, I wish to see you, Śaṃkara. O Lord, you have appeared (before) in this way by the power of supreme knowledge. (You are) he, the Siddha who has been pierced (by the power of the Command) and, made of universal bliss, is accompanied by Yogeśvarī. He is Śaṃkara’s lord; supreme, he has five faces, three eyes, holds a spear and, adorned with matted hair and crown [i.e., jaṭā-mukuṭa-maṇḍita], (his) divine body is covered with ashes. He is the pervasive lord Ardhanarīśvara”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Maṇḍita (मण्डित) refers to “(being) decorated”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] I approach the great temple of goddess Mṛḍānī that opens to the west. It is guarded outside by Indra and the other [gods who guard the directions], and shines beautifully with utmost richness. I venerate the young elephant-faced master of Śiva’s gaṇas, the destroyer of obstacles. His lotus-hands are decorated (maṇḍita) with a noose, goad, fruit, and lotus. [...]

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (shaivism)

Maṇḍita (मण्डित) means “adorned with”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult. Accordingly, “O goddess, Svacchanda is in the middle, within the abode of the triangle. Very powerful, he has five faces with three times five flaming eyes. He has ten arms and, very fierce, is adorned with many garlands [i.e., nānā-sragdāman-maṇḍita], ornaments, necklaces and anklets. He has beautiful matted hair and the half moon is his crest jewel. O beloved, the face in the east is white like cow’s milk, it shines brilliant white. Generating great energy, contemplate it thus. One should think that the northern face is like the young rising sun, the form of a pomegranate flower and (red) like a Bandhūka”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Maṇḍita (मण्डित) (Cf. Vibhūṣita) refers to “adorned” (by a chignon of matted locks), according to the 9th-century Sarvajñānottaratantra chapter 18.—Accordingly, “Next, I shall teach the best observance among observances, which is known as the Śiva-vrata and which is revered by Asuras and Gods alike. Pure pale ash [should be used, and] white dress and unguents; he should wear a white sacred thread and be adorned (maṇḍita) by a chignon of matted locks. He should be equipped with all [suitable] ornaments, [and] adorned with white garlands; he should consume [only the pure ritual gruel-offering known as] caru; he should observe the chaste conduct of a student; he should venerate Śiva, the fire and his Guru. [...]”.

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Maṇḍita (मण्डित) refers to “being decorated”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 13.1-9, while describing the appearance and worship of Viṣṇu, in the form of Nārāyaṇa]—“He should always think of the four-armed Nārāyaṇa arising. [...] Deva bears divine garments [and] sits atop a divine flower [i.e., a lotus]. [He is] decorated with a gleaming crown of rubies, a small bell, and a net (kiṅkiṇījāla-maṇḍita) [and] wears heavenly earrings. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Maṇḍita (मण्डित) refers to “(being) adorned” (by a crest of dreadlocks), according to the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi [i.e., Cakrasamvara Meditation] ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Standing on top of Mahābhairava and Kālirātrī, embracing Vajravārāhī, With both arms holding a vajra and bell, adorned by a crest of dreadlocks (jaṭāmakuṭa-maṇḍita), Decorated by a crown of skulls, holding a half moon on top of the head, Topped by the form of the Viśva Vajra, a fierce face, horrible gigantic fangs, Possessing the emotions beginning with the erotic, putting on a tiger skin, Wearing a garland of half a hundred human heads together, Possessing the six seals, adorned with a necklace, bracelets, Ear-rings, girdle, a crest jewel, (and) covered in ashes”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: HereNow4u: Lord Śrī Mahāvīra

Maṇḍita (मण्डित) is the name of the sixth gaṇadhara (group-leader) of Mahāvīra.—Maṇḍita was a Brahmin of the Vaśiṣṭha-gotra and a resident of the Maurya province. His father’s name was Dhanadeva and his mother’s name was Vijayādevī. Obtaining clarifications for his doubt regarding the relationship between the soul and the world, impressed, he along with his 350 students took initiation. He was 53 years old at that time. After observing the mendicant's vows for 14 years, he attained pure knowledge at the age of 67 and after being a kevalī for 16 years, observing a fast, he attained liberation at the Guṇaśīla-caitya during the lifetime of the Lord at the age of 83 years.

All these gaṇadharas (for example, Maṇḍita) were Brahmins by caste and Vedic scholars. After taking initiation, they all studied the 11 Aṅgas. Hence, all of them had the knowledge of the 14 pūrvas and possessed special attainments (labdhis).

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mandita in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

maṇḍita : (pp. of maṇḍeti) adorned; decorated.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Maṇḍita, (pp. of maṇḍeti) adorned, embellished, dressed up Sdhp. 244, 540. In cpd. °pasādhita beautifully adorned at J. I, 489; II, 48; VI, 219.—Cp. abhi°. (Page 517)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

maṇḍita (मंडित).—p (S) Ornamented or decorated. 2 fig. Adorned, graced, beautified. Ex. śānti kṣamā dayā viśēṣa || tēṇēṃ maṇḍita satpurūṣa ||.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

maṇḍita (मंडित).—p Ornamented, adorned.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Maṇḍita (मण्डित).—p. p. Adorned, decorated; मणिमयमकरमनोहरकुण्डलमण्डितगण्डमुदारम् (maṇimayamakaramanoharakuṇḍalamaṇḍitagaṇḍamudāram) Gīt.; स्वयं च मण्डिता नित्यं परिमृष्टपरिच्छदा (svayaṃ ca maṇḍitā nityaṃ parimṛṣṭaparicchadā) Bhāgavata 7.11.26.

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Maṇḍita (मण्डित).—Name of one of the Gaṇādhipas of the Jains.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maṇḍita (मण्डित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) Ornamented, adorned. m.

(-taḥ) One of the eleven persons called Ganadhipas by the Jainas. E. maḍi to adorn, aff. kta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Maṇḍita (मण्डित):—[from maṇḍ] mfn. adorned, decorated, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] m. (with Jainas) Name of one of the 11 Gaṇādhipas, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maṇḍita (मण्डित):—[(taḥ-tā-taṃ) a.] Ornamented. m. A Ganādhipa among the Jainas.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Maṇḍita (मण्डित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ciṃcaia, Ciṃcia, Ciṃcillia, Ṭiviḍikkia, Maṃḍi, Maṃḍia.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mandita in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mandita in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Maṃḍita (मंडित) [Also spelled mandit]:—(a) corroborated/supported; decorated, adorned, embellished, ornamented.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Maṃḍita (ಮಂಡಿತ):—

1) [adjective] embellished; decorated; ornamented.

2) [adjective] set up; founded; instituted.

3) [adjective] putforward (for discussion, as a bill, proposal, etc. in an assembly).

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Maṃḍita (ಮಂಡಿತ):—

1) [noun] a man who is ornamented, embellished with.

2) [noun] a position; status; rank.

3) [noun] a frog.

4) [noun] a horse.

5) [noun] that which thinks, perceives, feels, wills, etc.; seat or subject of consciousness; the mind.

6) [noun] grass or hay.

7) [noun] the moon.

8) [noun] a swan.

9) [noun] a lotus plant or flower.

10) [noun] a hill.

11) [noun] the quality of being sweet; sweetness.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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