Mrida, Mṛdā, Mṛḍa, Mṛḍā: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Mrida means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Mṛdā and Mṛḍa and Mṛḍā can be transliterated into English as Mrda or Mrida, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Mṛdā (मृदा, “the rubbing one”).—One of the names of the Goddess, Devī, who is regarded as the female principle of the divine; the embodiement of the energies of the Gods.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mṛḍa (मृड) is another name for Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.24 (“Śiva consents to marry Pārvatī”).—Accordingly, as Viṣṇu said to Śiva: “O great lord, you are omniscient. You are the immanent being and the lord of all. Don’t you know what is in our mind? Still I speak at you bidding. O Śiva [i.e., Mṛḍa], many kinds of miseries have befallen us due to the demon Tāraka. It is for that that you have been propitiated by the gods. For attaining you Śivā is born of mountain Himācala. The demon’s death can be at the hands of your son alone begotten of her. [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mṛḍa (मृड).—A name of Śiva.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IV. 2. 8.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ganitashastra (Mathematics and Algebra)

Source: archive.org: Hindu Mathematics

Mṛḍa (मृड) represents the number 11 (eleven) in the “word-numeral system” (bhūtasaṃkhyā), which was used in Sanskrit texts dealing with astronomy, mathematics, metrics, as well as in the dates of inscriptions and manuscripts in ancient Indian literature.—A system of expressing numbers by means of words arranged as in the place-value notation was developed and perfected in India in the early centuries of the Christian era. In this system the numerals [e.g., 11—mṛḍa] are expressed by names of things, beings or concepts, which, naturally or in accordance with the teaching of the Śāstras, connote numbers.

Ganitashastra book cover
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Ganitashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, gaṇitaśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science of mathematics, algebra, number theory, arithmetic, etc. Closely allied with astronomy, both were commonly taught and studied in universities, even since the 1st millennium BCE. Ganita-shastra also includes ritualistic math-books such as the Shulba-sutras.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Mṛḍa.—also called pṛḍa or pruḍa (JNSI, Vol. XVI, p. 40); unit of metal weight like the mañjāḍi. Note: mṛḍa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Mṛḍa.—name of a weight like māñjāḍi (q. v.). Cf. pṛḍa, pruḍ. Note: mṛḍa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mṛḍa (मृड).—An epithet of Śiva; जनसुखकृते सत्त्वोद्रिक्तौ मृडाय नमो नमः (janasukhakṛte sattvodriktau mṛḍāya namo namaḥ) Śiva-mahimna S.3.

Derivable forms: mṛḍaḥ (मृडः).

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Mṛḍā (मृडा).—An epithet of Pārvatī; शङ्के सुन्दरि कालकूटमपिबत् मूढो मृडानीपतिः (śaṅke sundari kālakūṭamapibat mūḍho mṛḍānīpatiḥ) Gītagovinda 12.

See also (synonyms): mṛḍānī, mṛḍī.

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Mṛdā (मृदा).—See मृद् (mṛd).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mṛḍa (मृड).—m.

(-ḍaḥ) 1. A name of Siva. 2. The fire that completes an oblation. f. [ḍā or -ḍā(dā)nī] Durga, the wife of Siva. E. mṛḍ to be pleased or delighted, aff. ka, fem. aff. ṅīṣ, with ānuk augment.

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Mṛdā (मृदा).—f.

(-dā) Earth, clay, soil. E. mṛd to trample on, affs. aṅ and ṭāp .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mṛḍa (मृड).—[mṛḍ + a], m. Śiva. f. ḍā, ḍī, Durgā.

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Mṛdā (मृदा).—[mṛd + ā], f. Earth, clay.

— Cf. [Gothic.] mulda; [Anglo-Saxon.] molde; probably [Latin] merda.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mṛḍa (मृड).—[adjective] merciful, gracious; [masculine] [Epithet] of Agni & Śiva.

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Mṛdā (मृदा).—[feminine] clay, loam.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mṛḍa (मृड):—[from mṛḍ] mfn. showing compassion or mercy, gracious, [Kāṭhaka; Āśvalāyana-gṛhya-sūtra]

2) [v.s. ...] m. Name of Agni at the Pūrṇāhuti, [Gṛhyāsaṃgraha]

3) [v.s. ...] of Śiva, [Śivagītā, ascribed to the padma-purāṇa]

4) [v.s. ...] f(ā or ī). Name of Pārvati, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Mṛdā (मृदा):—[from mṛd] f. clay, loam, earth, [Śvetāśvatara-upaniṣad]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mṛḍa (मृड):—(ḍaḥ) 1. m. Shiva. f. (tī) Durgā.

2) Mṛdā (मृदा):—(dā) 1. f. Earth, soil.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mrida in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mṛḍa (ಮೃಡ):—[noun] Śiva.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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