Medhra, Meḍhra: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Medhra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: academia.edu: The Śaiva Yogas and Their Relation to Other Systems of Yoga

Meḍhra (मेढ्र, “genitals”) refers to one of the sixteen types of “locus” or “support” (ādhāra) according to the Netratantra. These ādhāras are called so because they “support” or “localise” the self and are commonly identified as places where breath may be retained. They are taught in two different setups: according to the tantraprakriyā and according to the kulaprakriyā. Meḍhra belongs to the latter system.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Meḍhra (मेढ्र):—Phallus or male genital organ, Penis, The male organ of copulation and of urination.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Meḍhra (मेढ्र) refers to the “genitals”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, as Bhairava explains: “[...] The womb (of energy) (yoni) between the anus and the genitals [i.e., guda-meḍhra-antara] shines like heated gold. One should imagine that it [i.e., parāśakti—the supreme energy] enters the other body up to the end of emission (in the End of the Twelve). O goddess, that very moment, (the disciple) is well pierced and so falls shaking (to the ground). Having visualized (the goddess) entering into the middle of the Heart in the form of a flame, the goddess in the sheath of the lotus (of the Heart) can cause even mountains to fall”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Meḍhra (मेढ्र).—[mih-ṣṭran] A ram.

-ḍhram The male organ of generation, penis; (yasya) मेढ्रं चोन्मादशुक्राभ्यां हीनं क्लीबः स उच्यते (meḍhraṃ conmādaśukrābhyāṃ hīnaṃ klībaḥ sa ucyate).

Derivable forms: meḍhraḥ (मेढ्रः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Meḍhra (मेढ्र).—m.

(-ḍhraḥ) 1. The penis. 2. A ram. E. mih to urine, ṣṭran aff.; also with kan, meḍhraka .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Meḍhra (मेढ्र).—i. e. mih + tra, n. 1. The penis, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 8, 282. 2. A ram.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Meḍhra (मेढ्र).—[neuter] ([masculine]) the membrum virile.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Meḍhra (मेढ्र):—n. or ([cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) m. ([from] √1. mih + tra) membrum virile, penis, [Atharva-veda] etc. etc.

2) m. a ram, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Meḍhra (मेढ्र):—(ḍhraḥ) 1. m. The penis; a ram.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Meḍhra (मेढ्र):—(von 1. mih)

1) n. (m. nach den Lexicographen) das männliche Glied [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 3, 2, 182.] [Amarakoṣa 2, 6, 2, 27] [?(ed. Calc. Nalopākhyāna). Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 3, 3, 267. Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 610. Halāyudha 2, 359. Atharvavedasaṃhitā 7, 95, 3. Vājasaneyisaṃhitā 6, 14. Kātyāyana’s Śrautasūtrāṇi 6, 6, 3. Pañcaviṃśabrāhmaṇa 17. 4, 1. LĀṬY. 8, 6, 3. Kauśika’s Sūtra zum Atuarvaveda 44. Manu’s Gesetzbuch 8, 282. Mahābhārata 12, 11555. Suśruta 1, 90, 15. 118, 17. 124, 11. 273, 6. 338, 8. 342, 11. 2, 55, 15. Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka S. 52, 6. 53, 54. 58, 16. 67, 3. 68, 7. 70, 24. 93, 2. BṚH. 3, 3. Bhāgavatapurāṇa 2, 1, 32. 4, 29, 14] (vulva [BURN.][). 8, 5, 39] (tas) . [Mārkāṇḍeyapurāṇa 59, 11.] m. vielleicht bei [Kātyāyana] in [DĀYABH. 163, 4] (wenn hīnaḥ richtig ist, muss meḍhraśco gelesen werden). ja Beiname Śiva’s [Mahābhārata 13, 1174.] carman Vorhaut [Suśruta 1, 296, 14.] Vgl. nīcā . —

2) m. Widder (vgl. mīḍhvaṃs 1,b.) [Amarakoṣa.2,9,77]; vgl. meṇḍha, meṇḍhaka, meṇḍhra, meṣa .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Meḍhra (मेढ्र):——

1) m. (ausnahmsweise) und n. das männliche Glied.

2) *m. Widder.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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