Medhya, Medhyā, Meḍhyā: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Medhya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Medhya (मेध्य) is a Sanskrit technical term, referring to “nootropic” drugs. The term is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Suśruta-saṃhitā and the Caraka-saṃhitā.

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Medhya (मेध्य) refers to that which is “intellectualizing” (i.e., cow’s milk), as mentioned in verse 5.21-23 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] among the (different kinds of milk [viz., payas]), cow’s milk [viz., gavya] (is) a vitalizer (and) elixir; (it is) wholesome for pulmonary rupture and pulmonary consumption, intellectualizing [viz., medhya], invigorative, productive of breast-milk, (and) purgative, (and) destroys fatigue, giddiness, intoxication, unbeautifulness, dyspnea, cough, excessive thirst, hunger, old fever, strangury, and hemorrhage [...]”.

Note: Medhya (“intellectualizing”) has been paraphrased by yid gźuṅs byed (“renders one's intellect keen”), balya (“invigorative”) by stobs skyed (“promotes vigour”), and bhrama (“giddiness”) (as in previous such cases) by mgo ’khor (“spinning head”).

Source: Research Gate: Internal applications of Vatsanabha (Aconitum ferox wall)

Medhya (मेध्य) refers to “intellect”. Vatsanābha (Aconitum ferox), although categorized as sthāvara-viṣa (vegetable poisons), has been extensively used in ayurvedic pharmacopoeia.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

1) Medhyā (मेध्या) is another name for Jyotiṣmatī, a medicinal plant identified with Celastrus paniculatus (black oil plant or intellect tree) from the Celastraceae or “staff vine” or “bittersweet family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.82 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Medhyā and Jyotiṣmatī, there are a total of twelve Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Medhyā (मेध्या) is also mentioned as a synonym for Tejovatī, a medicinal plant similar to Jyotiṣmatī Celastrus paniculatus (black oil plant or intellect tree) from the Celastraceae or “staff vine” or “bittersweet family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.82. The Raj Nighantu reads Jyotiṣmatī and Tejovatī together while Bāpālāl identifies Tejovatī with Zanthoxylum budrunga (cape yellowwood or Indian ivy-rue) from the Rutaceae or “rue” or “citrus” family.

3) Medhyā (मेध्या) is also mentioned as a synonym for Śaṅkhapuṣpī, a medicinal plant identified with Convolvulus microphyllus, synonym of Convolvulus prostratus (prostrate bindweed) from the Convolvulaceae or “morning glory” family of flowering plants, according to verse 3.132-134.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Medhya (मेध्य).—A holy place on the west coast. A river flows through this place. This sacred river is believed to be the place of origin of Agni. This is one of the rivers worthy to be remembered every morning and evening. (Chapter 155, Anuśāsana Parva).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Meḍhyā (मेढ्या).—Compared to Dhruva among the luminaries.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IV. 12. 39.

2) Medhya (मेध्य).—The snow-making rays of the sun.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 53. 21.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Medhya (मेध्य) refers to the name of a Tīrtha (pilgrim’s destination) mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. III.87.12). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Medhya) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Medhya.—cf. a-paśu-medhya (IE 8-5), ‘free from the obligation of supplying animals for sacrifices’. Note: medhya is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mēḍhyā (मेढ्या).—a (mēḍha Stake or post.) A term for a person considered as the pillar, prop, or support (of a household, army, or other body), the staff or stay. 2 Applied to a person acquainted with clandestine or knavish transactions. 3 See mēḍhē- jōśī.

--- OR ---

mēdhya (मेध्य).—a S (Purposed, necessary, or proper) to be sacrificed. 2 Pure.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mēdhya (मेध्य).—f (Proper, purposed) to be sacrificed. Pure.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Medhya (मेध्य).—a. [medh-ṇyat, medhāya hitaṃ yat vā]

1) Fit for a sacrifice; अजाश्वयोर्मुखं मेध्यम् (ajāśvayormukhaṃ medhyam) Y.1.194; Ms.5.54.

2) Relating to a sacrifice, sacrificial; मेध्येनाश्वेनेजे (medhyenāśveneje); R.13. 3; उषा वा अश्वस्य मेध्यस्य शिरः (uṣā vā aśvasya medhyasya śiraḥ) Bṛ. Up.1.1.1.

3) Pure, sacred, holy; भुवं कोष्णेन कुण्डोघ्नी मध्येनावमृथादपि (bhuvaṃ koṣṇena kuṇḍoghnī madhyenāvamṛthādapi) R.1.84; 3.31;14.81.

4) Ved. Fresh, strong, vigorous.

5) Wise, intelligent.

-dhyaḥ 1 A goat.

2) A Khadira tree.

3) Barley (according to Medinī).

-dhyā 1 Name of several plants (ketakī, śaṅkhapuṣpī, rocanā, śamī &c.).

2) The gallstone of a cow (rocanā).

3) A particular vein.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Medhya (मेध्य).—mfn.

(-dhyaḥ-dhyā-dhyaṃ) 1. Pure, purified. 2. Fit for a sacrifice or oblation. f.

(-dhyā) A kind of orris root, described as the red sort. 3. A sort of pigment: see rocanā. m.

(-dhyaḥ) 1. K'hayer, (Mimosa catechu.) 2. Barley. 3. A goat. E. medh to associate, aff. ṇyat; or medha a sacrifice, and yat aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Medhya (मेध्य).—i. e. medha + ya, adj. 1. Fit for, belonging to, a sacrifice, [Uttara Rāmacarita, 2. ed. Calc., 1862.] 39, 10. 2. Pure, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 92.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Medhya (मेध्य).—[adjective] full of sap or pith, vigorous, mighty; fit for a sacrifice, pure, undefiling.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Medhya (मेध्य):—[from medh] mf(ā)n. ([from] medha) full of sap, vigorous, fresh, mighty, strong, [Atharva-veda]

2) [v.s. ...] fit for a sacrifice or oblation, free from blemish (as a victim), clean, pure, not defiling (by contact or by being eaten), [Brāhmaṇa; Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] ([from] medhā). wise, intelligent, [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā]

4) [v.s. ...] = medhām arhati [gana] daṇḍādi

5) [v.s. ...] m. a goat, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] Acacia Catechu, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] Saccharum Munja, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] barley, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] Name of the author of [Ṛg-veda viii, 53; 57; 58; Anukramaṇikā]

10) Medhyā (मेध्या):—[from medhya > medh] f. Name of various plants (thought to be sacrificially pure), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] the gall-stone of a cow (= recanā), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] a [particular] vein, [Pañcarātra]

13) [v.s. ...] Name of a river, [Mahābhārata]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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