Keshabandha, aka: Kesha-bandha, Keśabandha; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Keshabandha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Keśabandha can be transliterated into English as Kesabandha or Keshabandha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Keshabandha in Natyashastra glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Keśabandha (केशबन्ध) refers to a gesture (āṅgika) made with ‘dance hands’ (nṛttahasta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. The hands (hasta) form a part of the human body which represents one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used in dramatic performance. With these limbs are made the various gestures (āṅgika), which form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

1) One of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-six combined Hands).—Keśa-bandha (tying the hair): Patāka hands binding the hair. Patron deity Durgā. Usage: gem-pillar, binding the hair, cheek, etc.

2) Keśa-bandha is one of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-seven combined Hands).

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

Keśabandha (केशबन्ध).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with dance-hands (nṛttahasta);—(Instructions): The two hands moved out from the hair-knot (keśabandha) and held on the sides. The Dance-hands are to be used in forming Karaṇas.

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

Discover the meaning of keshabandha or kesabandha in the context of Natyashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Keshabandha in Shilpashastra glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Keśabandha (केशबन्ध):—A mode of dressing hair.—The mode called keśabandha is employed in relation to Sarasvatī among divine beings, and in relation to the queens of adhirājas among human beings.

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Keshabandha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Keśabandha (केशबन्ध).—

1) a hair-band; (virājase) मुकुटेन विचित्रेण केशबन्धेन शोभिना (mukuṭena vicitreṇa keśabandhena śobhinā) Mb. 4.6.12.

12) a particular position of hands in dancing.

Derivable forms: keśabandhaḥ (केशबन्धः).

Keśabandha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms keśa and bandha (बन्ध).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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