Mauli, Maulī, Maulin: 35 definitions

Introduction:

Mauli means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi, biology, Tamil. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

Mauli (मौलि):—The commonly known Sanskrit name for the head-gear is Mauli. There are various well-known varieties of head-gear such as:

  1. Jaṭāmukuṭa,
  2. Kirīṭamukuṭa 
  3. and Karaṇḍamukuṭa.

And the minor varieties thereof are:

  1. Śirastraka,
  2. Kuntala,
  3. Keśabandha,
  4. Dhammilla
  5. and Alakacūḍaka

In the formation of these minor varieties, the plaits of hair are bound by what are called

  1. Patrapaṭṭa,
  2. Puṣpapaṭṭa and
  3. Ratnapaṭṭa
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mauli (मौलि) refers to “crest” and is used to describe Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.20 (“The story of the submarine fire”).—Accordingly, as Nārada said to Brahmā: “O Brahmā, please tell me “Where did the flame of fire emerging from the eye of Śiva go?” Please tell me also the further story of the moon-crested lord [i.e., śaśin-mauli]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Mauli (मौलि).—A Tripravara.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 196. 33.

1b) A son of Maṇibhadra.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 156.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Maulī (मौली) refers to a type of mask (pratiśiras) or crown, prescribed for the middling gods (as opposed to superioir or inferior) and kings, according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 23. It is also known by the name Mastakī. Providing masks is a component of nepathya (costumes and make-up) and is to be done in accordance with the science of āhāryābhinaya (extraneous representation).

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Ancient Science of Life: Vaidyavallabha: An Authoritative Work on Ayurveda Therapeutics

Mauli (मौलि) is a Sanskrit technical term referring to the “head”, and is dealt with in the 17th-century Vaidyavallabha written by Hastiruci.—The Vaidyavallabha is a work which deals with the treatment and useful for all 8 branches of Ayurveda. The text Vaidyavallabha (mentioning mauli) has been designed based on the need of the period of the author, availability of drugs during that time, disease manifesting in that era, socio-economical-cultural-familial-spiritual-aspects of that period Vaidyavallabha.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Mauli (मौलि) refers to “crowns (studded with jewels)”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] O mother! Even the kings of gods bow to the feet of those men who have acquired a drop of the grace of seeing you. Kings of all the rich lands extending to the four oceans [bow to them] all the more, illuminating their footrests with the studded jewels of their elevated crowns (mauli-maṇi)”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Maulin (मौलिन्) refers to “one having a crown”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 9.19cd-26, while instructing to visualize Sadāśiva in order to worship the formless Amṛteśa]—“[He] resembles the swelling moon, a heap of mountain snow. [...] [Sadāśiva has] a shield, a mirror, a bow, a citron tree, and a water jar. At his head is a half moon (candrārdha-maulin). [He who meditates of Sadāśiva] should perceive the Eastern face as yellow; the Southern a wrathful, terrible black [that has] an unnatural, tusked mouth. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Shodhganga: Kasyapa Samhita—Text on Visha Chikitsa (p)

Maulin (मौलिन्) refers to “one’s head”, according to the second chapter of the Kāśyapa Saṃhitā: an ancient Sanskrit text from the Pāñcarātra tradition dealing with both Tantra and Viṣacikitsā (Toxicology).—Accordingly, text text dictates that a Garuḍa-upāsaka, the aspirant, must meditate on Garuḍa of the following form—[...] His right foot is in the Svastika shape while the left is curved. His feet touch the Nether world while his head (maulin) reaches the heavens, Brahmaloka. He has a bright face with a sharp nose and eyes. He has a huge face with sharp teeth.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Mauli (मौलि) refers to a “crown”, according to the Sūryārgha (sun offering) ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “[...] [Make patron put a ṭīkā red mark on the ritual lamp.] To Śrī Sūrya, red sandalwood, homage. [Make patron offer a red flower to the ritual lamp.] To Śrī Sūrya, a red flower, homage. [Make patron put a sacred thread on the ritual lamp.] To Śrī Sūrya, a red sacred thread, homage. [Make patron hold rice and pray.] Oṃ homage to Śrī Sūrya the divine. Appearing as the Mantra flower, An ancient sage, whose great rays spread like a crown (mauli), Remover of all sins and obstacles, I bow to the maker of day”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Mauli (मौलि) refers to the “head”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “The thirty gods, whose heads are bowed (nata-mauli), bow down to the line of lotus feet of those whose hearts have become a refuge only for the doctrine. That very same doctrine, which is devoted to the helpless, is a preceptor and a friend, and the doctrine is a master and a brother. It is a protector without a motive”.

Synonyms: Mukuṭa.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Wikipedia: India History

Mauli is another name for Sant Dnyaneshwar was a 13th-century Indian Marathi saint, poet, philosopher and Yogi of the Nath and Varkari tradition. In his short life of 21 years, he authored Dnyaneshwari (a commentary on the Bhagavad Gita) and Amrutanubhav. These are the oldest surviving literary works in the Marathi language, and considered to be milestones in Marathi literature. Mauli’s [i.e., Sant Dnyaneshwar’s] ideas reflect the non-dualistic Advaita Vedanta philosophy and an emphasis on yoga and bhakti towards Vithoba, an incarnation of Lord Vishnu. [...]

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Mauli [मौली] in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Raphanus sativus from the Brassicaceae (Mustard) family. For the possible medicinal usage of mauli, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Mauli in Nepal is the name of a plant defined with Indopiptadenia oudhensis in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Piptadenia oudhensis Brandis (among others).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Kew Bulletin (1955)
· Forest Fl. N. W. India (1874)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Mauli, for example pregnancy safety, chemical composition, diet and recipes, side effects, health benefits, extract dosage, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

māulī (माउली).—f (Used esp. in poetry.) Commonly māvalī.

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mauli (मौलि) [or मौली, maulī].—f S The head. 2 A lock of hair on the crown.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

māulī (माउली).—f A mother. Gen- erally in poetry.

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mauli (मौलि) [-lī, -ली].—f The head; a lock of hair on the crown.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mauli (मौलि).—a. [mūlasyādūrabhavaḥ iñ] Head, foremost, best; अखिलपरिमलानां मौलिना सौरभेण (akhilaparimalānāṃ maulinā saurabheṇa) Bv.1.121.

-liḥ 1 The head, the crown of the head; मौलौ वा रचयाञ्जलिम् (maulau vā racayāñjalim) Ve. 3.4; R.13.59; Kumārasambhava 5.79.

2) The head or top of anything, top-most point; Uttararāmacarita 2.3; देव्यग्रदीपमालाया मौलिदीपतुलां दधौ (devyagradīpamālāyā maulidīpatulāṃ dadhau) Parṇāl.

3) The Aśoka tree.

-liḥ (m., f.)

1) A crown, diadem, tiara; अलब्धशाणोत्कषणा नृपाणां न जातु मौलौ मणयो वसन्ति (alabdhaśāṇotkaṣaṇā nṛpāṇāṃ na jātu maulau maṇayo vasanti) Bv.1.73.

2) Hair on the crown of the head, tuft or lock of hair; जटामौलि (jaṭāmauli) Kumārasambhava 2.26 (jaṭājūṭa Malli.); पुष्पितलतान्तनियमितंविलम्बिमौलिना (puṣpitalatāntaniyamitaṃvilambimaulinā) Kirātārjunīya 12.41.

3) Braided hair, hair braided and ornamented; दुःशासनेन कचकर्षणभिन्नमौलिः (duḥśāsanena kacakarṣaṇabhinnamauliḥ) Ve.6.34.

-liḥ, -lī f. The earth.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Maulin (मौलिन्).—a. Having a crown, crested.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mauli (मौलि).—mf. (-liḥ-liḥ or ) 1. A lock of hair on the crown of the head. 2. Hair ornamented and braided round the head. 3. A diadem, a tiara. 4. The head. f. (-lī) The earth. E. mūla the root or base, aff. iñ; or mūla a name, and aff of descent; or to bind, li aff., and the radical vowel changed.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mauli (मौलि).— (akin to mūla), m. and f. 1. A lock of hair on the crown of the head. 2. Hair ornamented and braided round the head. 3. A crown, diadem, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 60; [Pañcatantra] 230, 18. 4. The head, [Lassen, Anthologia Sanskritica.] 66, 2; [Hitopadeśa] 72, 19 (maulau nidhāya, Obeying).

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Maulī (मौली).— (akin to mūla), f. The earth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maulin (मौलिन्).—i. e. mauli + in, adj. Endowed with a diadem, [Sundopasundopākhyāna] 1, 30.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mauli (मौलि).—[masculine] head, top, point; crest, diadem (also [feminine]). —maulau nidhā put on the head i.e. receive with submission.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Maulin (मौलिन्).—[adjective] diademed, crested; being at the head of, excelling (—°).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mauli (मौलि):—[from maula] m. the head, the top of anything, [Harivaṃśa; Kāvya literature; Hitopadeśa] etc. (maulau ni-√dhā, to place on the head, receive respectfully)

2) [v.s. ...] chief, foremost, best, [Bhāminī-vilāsa]

3) [v.s. ...] Jonesia Asoka, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] [patronymic] [Pravara texts]

5) [v.s. ...] [plural] Name of a people, [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

6) [v.s. ...] mf. a diadem, crown, crest, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

7) [v.s. ...] a tuft or lock of hair left on the crown of the head after tonsure, a top-knot (= cūḍā), [Kumāra-sambhava] ([varia lectio])

8) [v.s. ...] hair ornamented and braided round the head (= dhammilla), [Veṇīs.]

9) [v.s. ...] the earth, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) Maulī (मौली):—[from mauli > maula] f. the earth, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Maulin (मौलिन्):—[from maula] mfn. ([from] mauli) having anything uppermost or turned upwards (See cakra-m)

2) [v.s. ...] being at the head, chief, [Kāvya literature]

3) [v.s. ...] having a diadem or crown, diademed, crested (also applied to Śiva), [Mahābhārata; Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mauli (मौलि):—[(liḥ-lī)] 2. m. 3. f. A lock of hair on the crown of the head; a diadem; the head. f. The earth.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Mauli (मौलि) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Mauli.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mauli in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Mauli (मौलि):—(nm) the crown of the head, diadem; summit; (a) best, foremost, most outstanding.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Mauli (मौलि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Mukulin.

2) Mauli (मौलि) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Mauli.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mauli (ಮೌಲಿ):—

1) [noun] a top or apex; the tip.

2) [noun] the head.

3) [noun] a head-dress, usu. of gold and jewels, worn by king, as a symbol of authority; a crown.

4) [noun] plaited hair.

5) [noun] (fig.) a leader; a highly valued person.

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Mauḷi (ಮೌಳಿ):—[noun] = ಮೌಲಿ [mauli].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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Nepali dictionary

Source: unoes: Nepali-English Dictionary

Maulī (मौली):—n. the earth; adj. having crown in the head; crowned;

context information

Nepali is the primary language of the Nepalese people counting almost 20 million native speakers. The country of Nepal is situated in the Himalaya mountain range to the north of India.

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