Jalaka, Jālaka, Jalākā, Jalaga: 22 definitions

Introduction:

Jalaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Nighantu (Synonyms and Characteristics of Drugs and technical terms)

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu

Jālaka (जालक) refers to the “bud” of a flower, as mentioned in a list of four synonyms, according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). The Dharaṇyādi-varga covers the lands, soil, mountains, jungles and vegetation’s relations between trees [viz., Jālaka] and plants and substances, with their various kinds.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: OpenEdition books: Architectural terms contained in Ajitāgama and Rauravāgama

Jālaka (जालक) [or jāla] refers to “claustra §§ 2.1; 3.40; 4.22.”.—(For paragraphs cf. Les enseignements architecturaux de l'Ajitāgama et du Rauravāgama by Bruno Dagens)

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Jālaka (जालक) (i.e. Jālandhara, also: Karāla) is the name of a sacred place, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “(You) desire to hear (śrotukāmā) in (the place) called Oḍḍa. (You) desire to speak (vaktukāmā) in the one called Jālaka (i.e. Jālandhara). (You are in the place) called Pūrṇa (lit. ‘Full’) for (nourishing) fulfilment (puṣṭi) and (in the place) called Kāma (impelled) by the desire to see. The goddess abides (associated) with these places and (these) sacred seats burn splendidly with their own qualities. Without them living beings (would be) deaf, dumb, impotent and blind”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Jālaka (जालक) refers to “nets (of hair)”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 225-226).—Accordingly, while describing the shire of the Goddess Caṇḍikā, “[Then follows the image of the Goddess Caṇḍikā, which matches the conception of Kālarātri in the passage from the Mahābhārata:] Her feet were never bereft of cloths [dyed with] red lac thrown upon the mound of her seat [on the altar] as if they were the lives of all creatures arrived there for shelter; she resembled an inhabitant of the Underworld because of the intense darkness obstructed [only] by the flashes from axes, spears, etc., weapons deadly for beings, that seemed to hold nets of hair (keśa-jālaka) stuck from decapitations because of the reflections of black yak-tail whisks cast [upon their surfaces]; [...]”.

Kavya book cover
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: MDPI Books: The Ocean of Heroes

Jālaka (जालक) refers to the “web (of conceptualization)”, according to the 10th-century Ḍākārṇava-tantra: one of the last Tibetan Tantric scriptures belonging to the Buddhist Saṃvara tradition consisting of 51 chapters.—Accordingly, “[...] (The meaning of the letter ru, i.e., being free from conceptual arrangement, etc.—) [Taught in connection with] the conceptual arrangement, the selflessness of person, the great, is [accompanied by] a web of conceptualization (kalpanā-jālaka). The letter ru [represents the principle that] myself is conditioned: That [letter ru refers to the state of] being free from the conceptual arrangement of ‘mine’. [...]”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Ceylon Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society 1963

Jalaka is the name of a building at Mahāvihāra in Anurādhapura. The Jalaka or Lañjakāsana hall was built by Lañjatissa (B.C. 119-110). Mahāvihāra, also called the Tissārāma, was a region in the Southern Area of the city of Anurādhapura, founded in B.C. 246 by Devānaṃpiya Tissa and presented to the great Thera, Mahinda. Its territory (including Jalaka) comprised the Jotivana (previously called Nandana) and Mahāmegha Parks, the area to south and south-east of the citadel.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

jālaka : (m.) a bud; a small net.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Jālaka, (nt.) (jāla1+ka) 1. a net J. VI, 536; Dāvs. V, 51. ‹-› 2. a bud A. IV, 117 sq. (°jāta in bud).—f. jālikā chain armour Miln. 199. (Page 283)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jaḷakā (जळका).—a (jaḷaṇēṃ) Burned, scorched, singed, seared.

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jaḷakā (जळका).—m (Nashik &c. jaḷaṇēṃ) Burning or great heat (of body): also prickly or vehement itching. v suṭa, hō. 2 Gnawing (in the throat or stomach) from bile. 3 Angry envying at or swelling against. v .

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

jaḷakā (जळका).—a Burned, singed, scorched.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jalaka (जलक).—A conch, shell.

Derivable forms: jalakam (जलकम्).

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Jalākā (जलाका).—A leech.

See also (synonyms): jalālukā, jalikā, jalukā, jalokā, jalokikā.

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Jālaka (जालक).—[jālamiva kāyati kai-ka]

1) A net.

2) A multitude, collection; बद्धं कर्णशिरीषरोधि वदने घर्माम्भसां जालकम् (baddhaṃ karṇaśirīṣarodhi vadane gharmāmbhasāṃ jālakam) Ś.1.3; R.9.68.

3) A lattice, window; जालकमुखोप गतान् (jālakamukhopa gatān) Śiśupālavadha 9.39; आननविलग्नजालकम् (ānanavilagnajālakam) R.9.68.

4) A bud, an unblown flower; अभिनवैर्जालकैर्मालतीनाम् (abhinavairjālakairmālatīnām) Meghadūta 98; so यूथिकाजालकानि (yūthikājālakāni) 26.

5) A kind of ornament (worn in the hair); तिलकजालकजालकमौक्तिकैः (tilakajālakajālakamauktikaiḥ) R.9.44 (ābharaṇaviśeṣaḥ).

6) A nest.

7) Illusion, deception.

8) A plantain or the fruit.

9) Pride.

1) A kind of tree; माधवीजालकादिभिः (mādhavījālakādibhiḥ) Bhāgavata 8.2.19.

-kaḥ 1 A window, lattice.

2) A fowler.

Derivable forms: jālakam (जालकम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Jālaka (जालक) or Jāla.—nt., probably bouquet of flowers (here withered ones, to be removed from caityas); so jālaka is used in Sanskrit; the only plausible alternative would be spider-web, which jāla also means in Sanskrit (compare Schmidt, Nachträge) and Pali. In any case it means something the removal of which from caityas is a work of merit: yo jālakāni apanaye (so read with v.l. for Senart upanaye) cetiyeṣu Mahāvastu ii.391.3; choretva jālaṃ jinacetiyeṣu 391.22, repeated in the sequel; parallel Śikṣāsamuccaya 306.2, 4 choritva jālaṃ; 6, 8, 10 apanīya (ed. em. upa°) jālaṃ. On the passage, misunderstood by Senart and Bendall, see s.v. chorayati. In the immediately following verses, Mahāvastu ii.392.21 ff., Śikṣāsamuccaya 306.11 ff., the meritorious removal of withered flowers is unambiguously mentioned.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalaka (जलक).—n.

(-kaṃ) A conch, a shell.

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Jalākā (जलाका).—f.

(-kā) A. leech. E. jala, and ak to go, ac aff. jale ākāyate prakā- śate ā-kai-ka .

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Jālaka (जालक).—n.

(-kaṃ) 1. A bud, a germ. 2. An unblown flower. 3. A nest. 4. A net. 5. Pride. 6. A plantain, the fruit. 7. Multitude, assemblage. m.

(-kaḥ) A window, a lattice, a loop or eyelet-hole. f.

(-likā) 1. Armour, chain armour. 2. A kind of cloth or raiment, woollen cloth. 3. A leech. 4. A window. 5. Iron. E. jāla, and kan added, or jal to enclose, vun aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jālaka (जालक).—[jāla + ka], I. n. 1. A net, [Pañcatantra] iii. [distich] 179. 2. (m?) A window, [Śiśupālavadha] 9, 39. 3. A bud, [Meghadūta, (ed. Gildemeister.)] 96. Ii. m. The name of a tree, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 8, 2, 18. Iii. f. likā. 1. A net. 2. A coat of mail, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 28, 26.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jālaka (जालक).—[neuter] net, web, grate, grated window, bundle of beeds or flowers, collection, multitude i.[grammar]; [masculine] a kind of tree; [feminine] jālikā net, veil, armour; multitude.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jalaka (जलक):—[from jala] n. a conch, [Horace H. Wilson]

2) Jālaka (जालक):—[from jāla] n. a net, woven texture, web (also [figuratively], ‘a multitude’, e. [gana] of tears running down the cheeks etc.), [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa xiv, 6, 11, 3; Rāmāyaṇa; Suśruta; Śakuntalā; Raghuvaṃśa; Ṛtusaṃhāra]

3) [v.s. ...] (ifc.), [Kathāsaritsāgara]

4) [v.s. ...] a lattice, eyelet, [Pañcatantra iii, 7, 40]

5) [v.s. ...] a lattice-window (m., [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]), [Śiśupāla-vadha ix, 39]

6) [v.s. ...] a bundle of buds, [Meghadūta; Mālavikāgnimitra v, 4]

7) [v.s. ...] ‘a kind of pearl-ornament’ See -mālin

8) [v.s. ...] a nest, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] a plantain, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] illusion, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] pride, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] m. Name of a tree, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa viii, 2, 18]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jalaka (जलक):—(kaṃ) 1. n. A shell, a conch.

2) Jalākā (जलाका):—[jalā+kā] (kā) 1. f. A leech.

3) Jālaka (जालक):—[(kaḥ-likā)] 1. n. A bud; a net; a nest; a plantain; pride. m. A lattice. f. Armour; woollen cloth; a leech; window; iron.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Jālaka (जालक) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Jālaga.

[Sanskrit to German]

Jalaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Jālaka (जालक):—(nm) a ploxus; lattice.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Jalaka (ಜಲಕ):—[noun] a washing or dipping of a thing, esp. the body, in water or other liquid, steam, etc.; the act of bathing.

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Jalaga (ಜಲಗ):—[noun] = ಜಲಗಾರ [jalagara]1.

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Jaḷaka (ಜಳಕ):—[noun] a washing or dipping of a thing, esp. the body, in water or other liquid, steam, etc.; the act of bathing.

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Jālaka (ಜಾಲಕ):—

1) [noun] a framework or structure of crossed wood or metal strips; lattice.

2) [noun] an opening in the wall of a building for the admission of air or light or both; a window.

3) [noun] a thin, silken material spun by spiders; cobweb.

4) [noun] an unblown flower; a flower-bud.

5) [noun] a group or multitude.

6) [noun] the act or practice of deceiving; an instance of this; deception.

7) [noun] a young growth on a plant, as a stem or branch; a shoot; a sprout.

8) [noun] a person trapped by a net, scheme, plan etc.

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Jāḷaka (ಜಾಳಕ):—

1) [noun] a framework or structure of crossed wood or metal strips; lattice.

2) [noun] an opening in the wall of a building for the admission of air or light or both; a window.

3) [noun] a thin, silken material spun by spiders; cobweb.

4) [noun] an unblown flower; a flower-bud.

5) [noun] a group or multitude.

6) [noun] the act or practice of deceiving; an instance of this; deception.

7) [noun] a young growth on a plant, as a stem or branch; a shoot; a sprout.

8) [noun] a person trapped by a net, scheme, plan etc.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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