Jalika, Jālika, Jālikā, Jalikā: 9 definitions

Introduction

Jalika means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Jālika (जालिक) was a soldier in Sunītha and Sūryaprabha’s army whose strength is considered as equaling a fivefold-power warrior (pañcaguṇaratha), according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 47. Accordingly, as the Asura Maya explained the arrangement of warriors in Sunītha’s army: “... [Jālika, and others], these kings and princes are warriors of fivefold power”.

The story of Jālika was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Jālika, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

One of the ten sons of Kalasoka.

-- or --

See Calika.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Jālikā (जालिका) refers to a “fish trap” and represents one of the items held in the right hand of Heruka: one of the main deities of the Herukamaṇḍala described in the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Heruka is positioned in the Lotus (padma) at the center; He is the origin of all heroes; He has 17 faces (with three eyes on each) and 76 arms [holding, for example, jālikā]; He is half black and half green in color; He is dancing on a flaming sun placed on Bhairava and Kālarātrī.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

jālika : (m.) a fisherman who uses a net. || jālikā (f.) an armour made of chain.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jalikā (जलिका).—A leech.

See also (synonyms): jalākā, jalālukā, jalukā, jalokā, jalokikā.

--- OR ---

Jālika (जालिक).—[jālena carati parpā° ṣṭhan]

1) A fisherman.

2) A fowler, bird-catcher.

3) A spider.

4) The governor or chief ruler of a province.

5) A rogue, cheat.

6) A conjurer, juggler.

-kā 1 A net.

2) A chain-armour.

3) A spider.

4) A leech.

5) A widow.

6) Iron.

7) Plantain.

8) A veil, woollen cloth.

Derivable forms: jālikaḥ (जालिकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Jālikā (जालिका).—(compare Sanskrit jālaka, nt., BhāgP.8.20.17, s.v. in [Boehtlingk and Roth], same meaning), a network (of jewels, used as an ornament): chinnāṃ jālikam (m.c. for °ām) a(d)dṛśāti supine ratanā- mikāṃ śobhanāṃ Lalitavistara 194.20 (verse), she saw in her dream her beautiful network, made of jewels, cut (so Tibetan, rin po che las byas paḥi dra ba…net made of jewels etc.); here the fem. adjectives prove that °kam is m.c. for °kām; the same must be assumed also in the next: muktā-maṇī- jālika-chāditāś ca Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 89.2 (verse), and covered with networks of pearls and gems (°ka m.c. for °kā).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalikā (जलिका).—f.

(-kā) A leech. E. jala water, and ṭhak affix: see jalaukā.

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Jālika (जालिक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kī-kaṃ) A cheat, a rogue, a vagabond, a conjuror or juggler. 2. One who employs nets, &c. for a livelihood. m.

(-kaḥ) A spider. 2. A fisherman. 3. A hunter using nets. E. jāla a net, &c. affix ṭhak .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jālika (जालिक).—[masculine] fowler.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jalikā (जलिका):—[from jala] a f. = laukā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc. [Scholiast or Commentator]]

2) b lukā, etc. See above.

3) Jālikā (जालिका):—[from jālaka > jāla] a f. a net (for catching birds etc.), [Kathāsaritsāgara lxi] (cf. mṛga-jālikā)

4) [v.s. ...] a veil, [Śāṅkhāyana-gṛhya-sūtra i, 14, 12/13] a kind of cloth or raiment, [Horace H. Wilson]

5) [v.s. ...] chain-armour, [Rāmāyaṇa iii, 28, 26]

6) [v.s. ...] a spider, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] plantain, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] a multitude, [Kādambarī iv, 145]

9) [v.s. ...] a widow, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] iron, [Horace H. Wilson]

11) [v.s. ...] = komāsikā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) Jālika (जालिक):—[from jāla] mf(ī)n. deceptive

13) [v.s. ...] m. a cheat [gana] parpādi

14) [v.s. ...] ([gana] vetanādi) ‘living on his net’, a bird-catcher, [Caṇḍa-kauśika ii, 2]

15) [v.s. ...] a spider, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

16) [v.s. ...] = grāma-jālin, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) Jālikā (जालिका):—2. jālikā f. = jal, [Horace H. Wilson]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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