Jalaja, Jala-ja: 20 definitions

Introduction:

Jalaja means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Jalaja (जलज) refers to the lotus and represents flowers (puṣpa) once commonly used in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa verse 45. The lotus is also called by the names Kamala, Padma, Nīlanalina and Nīlotpala (verse 62 and 339), Jātī (verse 429), Irā (verse 673-675ff.) and Kunda (verse 495).

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Jalaja (जलज) refers to “aquatic beings”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.5.2 (“The Prayer of the gods).—Accordingly, as the Gods eulogized Śiva: “[...] Obeisance to Thee, O lord, the penance, the bestower of the fruits of penance, obeisance to thee, worthy of eulogy, the eulogy, and to Thee whose mind is pleased with eulogy always. Obeisance to Thee delighted with Vedic conduct, to the one fond of praiseworthy conduct; to the one who has fourfold forms and the forms of aquatic (jalaja) and terrestrial beings [jalasthalajarūpiṇe]. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: OpenEdition books: Architectural terms contained in Ajitāgama and Rauravāgama

Jalaja (जलज) refers to “doucine (molding) § 3.9.”.—(For paragraphs cf. Les enseignements architecturaux de l'Ajitāgama et du Rauravāgama by Bruno Dagens)

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Jalaja (जलज) refers to “products of water”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 11), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If the stars of the constellation of Mṛgāśīrṣa should be dimmed by the tails of or appear to be in contact with malefic comets, the ruler of Auśīnara will perish; if those of Ārdrā, the ruler of the people subsisting by the products of water [i.e., jalaja-ājīva-adhipa] will perish; if those of Punarvasu the ruler of Aśmaka will perish; and if those of Puṣya the ruler of Magadha will perish”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: De Gruyter: A Buddhist Ritual Manual on Agriculture

Jalaja (जलज) refers to the “(various) water-born (beings)” (situated at the lotus-lake near Aḍakavatī), according to the Vajratuṇḍasamayakalparāja, an ancient Buddhist ritual manual on agriculture from the 5th-century (or earlier), containing various instructions for the Sangha to provide agriculture-related services to laypeople including rain-making, weather control and crop protection.—Accordingly, [when the Bhagavān reached the vicinity of the residence of Vaiśravaṇa], “[...] That lotus lake was covered by various blue lotuses, lotuses, white water-lilies and white lotuses. It contained various fish, Makaras, Timiṅgilas, alligators, bees and various other water-born beings (nānā-jalaja-ādirūpa). [...]”

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Jalaja [ଜଳଜ] in the Odia language is the name of a plant identified with Strychnos nux-vomica L. from the Loganiaceae (Logania) family. For the possible medicinal usage of jalaja, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

1) Jalaja in India is the name of a plant defined with Acorus calamus in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Acorus calamus var. americanus (Raf.) H.D. Wulff. (among others).

2) Jalaja is also identified with Amaranthus retroflexus It has the synonym Galliaria retroflexa (L.) Nieuwl. (etc.).

3) Jalaja is also identified with Baccaurea courtallensis It has the synonym Pierardia macrostachya Wight & Arn. (etc.).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Nature (London)
· Botaniceskjij Žurnal SSSR
· Flore de Madagascar et des Comores (1954)
· Cytologia (1983)
· Biotechnol. J.
· Int. Immunopharmacol.

If you are looking for specific details regarding Jalaja, for example side effects, extract dosage, diet and recipes, chemical composition, health benefits, pregnancy safety, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

jalaja : (adj.) born or sprung from the water. (nt.), a lotus.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Jalaja refers to: born or sprung from w. J. IV, 333; V, 445; VvA. 42;

Note: jalaja is a Pali compound consisting of the words jala and ja.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jalaja (जलज).—a S Born of or produced by water, aquatic. Hence (in poetry) a cloud, and jalajaghōṣa Thunder. Ex. lakṣadīpācā prakāśa || jalajaghōṣaghaṇṭā- varī ||.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

jalaja (जलज).—a Born of or produced by water, aquatic. A cloud.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jalaja (जलज).—a. born or produced in water. (-jaḥ) 1 an aquatic animal.

2) a fish; स्वयमेव हतः पित्रा जलजेनात्मजो यथा (svayameva hataḥ pitrā jalajenātmajo yathā) Rām.2.61.22.

3) sea-salt.

4) a collective name for several signs of the zodiac.

5) moss.

6) the moon. (-jaḥ, jam) 1 a shell.

2) the conch-shell; अधरोष्ठे निवेश्य दघ्मौ जलजं कुमारः (adharoṣṭhe niveśya daghmau jalajaṃ kumāraḥ) R.7. 63,1.6; इत्यादिश्य हृषीकेशः प्रध्माय जलजोत्तमम् (ityādiśya hṛṣīkeśaḥ pradhmāya jalajottamam) Bhāgavata 8.4. 26. -3 (-jaḥ) The Kaustubha gem; जलजः कौस्तुभे मीने तत् क्लीबे शङ्खपद्मयोः (jalajaḥ kaustubhe mīne tat klībe śaṅkhapadmayoḥ) | Nm. (jaḥ) -4 A kind of horse born in water; वाजिनो जलजाः केचिद् वह्निजातास्तथापरे । शालिहोत्र (vājino jalajāḥ kecid vahnijātāstathāpare | śālihotra) of भोज (bhoja), Appendix II,12.

-jam a lotus. °आजीवः (ājīvaḥ) a fisherman. °आसनः (āsanaḥ) an epithet of Brahmā; वाचस्पतिरुवाचेदं प्राञ्जलिर्जलजासनम् (vācaspatiruvācedaṃ prāñjalirjalajāsanam) Kumārasambhava 2.3. °कुसुमम् (kusumam) the lotus. °द्रव्यम् (dravyam) a pearl, shell or any other thing produced from the sea.

Jalaja is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jala and ja (ज).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalaja (जलज).—mfn.

(-jaḥ-jā-jaṃ) Water-born, aquatic. m.

(-jaḥ) 1. A fish. 2. Any aquatic animal. n.

(-jaṃ) 1. A lotus. 2. A shell. f.

(-jā) A plant; said to be a sort of bassia growing in or near water. E. jala, and ja produced. jale jāyate jala-ḍa .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalaja (जलज).—[jala-ja], I. adj., f. . 1. Water-born, [Harivaṃśa, (ed. Calc.)] 3621. 2. Existing in water, Mahābhārata 2, 94. Ii. m. 1. An aquatic animal, [Rāmāyaṇa] 5, 5, 30. 2. A fish, [Rāmāyaṇa] 2, 61, 22. 3. A shell, [Harivaṃśa, (ed. Calc.)] 10936. Iii. n. A lotus, Mahābhārata 2, 1813.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalaja (जलज).—[adjective] born or produced in water; [masculine] = [preceding] [masculine]; [neuter] product of the sea, pearl, shell, the lotus.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jalaja (जलज):—[=jala-ja] [from jala] mfn. produced or born or living or growing in water, coming from or peculiar to water, [Mahābhārata ii, 94; Rāmāyaṇa ii, 59, 11; Harivaṃśa; Suśruta]

2) [v.s. ...] m. an aquatic animal, fish, [Gautama-dharma-śāstra; Rāmāyaṇa; Suśruta] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] Barringtonia acutangula, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] sea-salt, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of several signs of the zodiac connected with water, [Dīpikā]

6) [v.s. ...] m. (also n., [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) a conch-shell (used as a trumpet, [Harivaṃśa 10936; Raghuvaṃśa; Bhāgavata-purāṇa]), [Mahābhārata vi, 4996; Harivaṃśa 8056; Bhāgavata-purāṇa viii, 20, 31]

7) [v.s. ...] n. = -ja-dravya, [Vā-BṛS. xiii, xv]

8) [v.s. ...] = -ruh, [Mahābhārata ii f.; Harivaṃśa; Rāmāyaṇa iv; Bhāgavata-purāṇa iii]

9) [v.s. ...] a kind of ebony, [Bhāvaprakāśa] ([varia lectio] la-da)

10) [v.s. ...] = la-kuntala, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] = -vetasa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) Jalajā (जलजा):—[=jala-jā] [from jala-ja > jala] f. a kind of Glycyrrhiza, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jalaja (जलज):—[jala-ja] (jaḥ) 1. m. Idem. n. A lotus. f. A plant, Bassia. a. Aquatic.

[Sanskrit to German]

Jalaja in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Jalaja (ಜಲಜ):—

1) [noun] the flower of any water plant, esp. lotus.

2) [noun] such a plant itself.

3) [noun] the shell of any marine mollusc; a sea-shell.

4) [noun] any of the flat, usu. coiled fossil shells of an order (Ammonoidea) of cephalopod molluscs, considered holy; an ammonite.

5) [noun] hydrogen (wongly forಜಲಜನಕ [jalajanaka]).

6) [noun] something placed or entrusted for safekeeping, esp. money depositt in a bank; a deposit.

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Jaḷaja (ಜಳಜ):—

1) [noun] the flower of any water plant, esp. lotus.

2) [noun] such a plant.

3) [noun] the shell of any marine mollusc; a sea-shell.

4) [noun] any of the flat, usu. coiled fossil shells of an order (Ammonoidea) of cephalopod molluscs, considered holy; an ammonite.

5) [noun] hydrogen (wrongly for ಜಲಜನಕ [jalajanaka]).

6) [noun] something placed or entrusted for safekeeping, esp. money put in a bank; a deposit.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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