Haricandana, Hari-candana, Haricamdana: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Haricandana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Harichandana.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Haricandana in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Haricandana (हरिचन्दन).—Offered to Śeṣa by Nāga maids.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 5. 25.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Haricandana in Shaktism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Haricandana (हरिचन्दन) refers to a type of tree, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] O goddess! You enter the heart of a man whose mind is composed. Sweet ballads of your renown, O Gaurī, the Vidyādharas sing in the groves of Haricandana trees that emit the sweet fragrance of liquor on the banks of the heavenly river”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Haricandana in Jainism glossary
Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Haricandana (हरिचन्दन) refers to “sandalwood”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Whatever difficulties arise from life, they are each endured here by the embodied soul, only having taken hold of the body powerfully. The body of men also defiles auspicious things [such as] camphor, saffron, aloe wood, musk, sandalwood (haricandana) because of [its] contact [with them]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Haricandana.—(CITD), a sort of yellow sandal-wood; one of the five trees of svarga; a title of nobility in medieval Orissa (Ep. Ind., Vol. XXXIII, p. 4); cf. Śrīcandana. Note: haricandana is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Haricandana in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

haricandana (हरिचंदन).—n m S A tree, furnishing the yellow sandal wood.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Haricandana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Haricandana (हरिचन्दन).—

1) a kind of yellow sandal (the wood or tree); ततः प्रकोष्ठे हरिचन्दना- ङ्किते (tataḥ prakoṣṭhe haricandanā- ṅkite) R.3.59;6.6; Ś.7.2; Kumārasambhava 5.59.

2) one of the five trees of paradise; पञ्चैते देवतरवो मन्दारः पारिजातकः । संतानः कल्पवृक्षश्च पुंसि वा हरिचन्दनम् (pañcaite devataravo mandāraḥ pārijātakaḥ | saṃtānaḥ kalpavṛkṣaśca puṃsi vā haricandanam) || Ak. (-nam) 1 moonlight.

2) saffron.

3) the filament of a lotus.

Derivable forms: haricandanaḥ (हरिचन्दनः), haricandanam (हरिचन्दनम्).

Haricandana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms hari and candana (चन्दन).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Haricandana (हरिचन्दन).—mn.

(-naḥ-naṃ) 1. A yellow and fragrant sort of Sandal wood. 2. One of the five trees of paradise, (the other four being, pārijāta, mandāra, santāna and kalpa.) n.

(-naṃ) 1. Saffron. 2. Moon-light. 3. The filament or farina of a lotus. 4. The person of a lover or mistress. E. hari Vishnu, or yellow, and candana Sandal.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Haricandana (हरिचन्दन).—I. m. and n. 1. A yellow and fragrant sort of sandal-wood. 2. a tree of paradise. Ii. n. 1. saffron. 2. moonlight. 3. the farina of the lotus. 4. the person of a beloved one.

Haricandana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms hari and candana (चन्दन).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Haricandana (हरिचन्दन).—[masculine] [neuter] a sort of yellow sandal tree or wood; one of the 5 trees of paradise.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Haricandana (हरिचन्दन):—[=hari-candana] [from hari] m. n. a sort of sandal tree, [Śiśupāla-vadha; Bhāgavata-purāṇa; Śatruṃjaya-māhātmya]

2) [v.s. ...] yellow sandal, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc. (in this sense [probably] only n.), one of the five trees of paradise (the other four being Pārijāta, Mandāra, Saṃtāna, and Kalpa), [Pañcarātra; Pañcatantra]

3) [v.s. ...] n. the pollen or filament of a lotus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] saffron, [ib.]

5) [v.s. ...] moonlight, [ib.]

6) [v.s. ...] the person of a lover or mistress, [ib.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Haricandana (हरिचन्दन):—[hari-candana] (naṃ) 1. m. n. Yellow fragrant sandal wood; tree of paradise. n. Saffron; moon-light; farina of the lotus; a mistress.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Haricandana (हरिचन्दन) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Haricaṃdaṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Haricandana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Haricandana in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Haricandana refers to: yellow sandal Vv 831; DhA.I, 28;

Note: haricandana is a Pali compound consisting of the words hari and candana.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Haricandana in Prakrit glossary
Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Haricaṃdaṇa (हरिचंदण) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Haricandana.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Haricandana in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Haricaṃdana (ಹರಿಚಂದನ):—[noun] the yellow variety of sandalwood (Santalum album).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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