Dvirada, Dvi-rada: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Dvirada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

Dvirada (elephant) is one of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-seven combined Hands).

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Dvirada (द्विरद) (lit. “one who has two tusks”) is a synonym (another name) for the Elephant (Gaja), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Dvirada in Kavya glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Dvirada (द्विरद) refers to “elephants”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 224-228).—Accordingly, “[Going ahead a little, he then sees that the Goddess Caṇḍikā] was enclosed by a door made from the ivory of wild elephants (vana-dvirada-danta), as yellowish-white as fragments of ketakī filaments, and an iron architrave bearing an ornamental garland of black iron mirrors surrounded by a row of red yak tail whisks resembling a garland of Śabara heads horrific with tawny hair”.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dvirada (द्विरद).—an elephant; सममेव समाक्रान्तं द्वयं द्विरदगामिना (samameva samākrāntaṃ dvayaṃ dviradagāminā) R.4.4; Me.61. °अन्तकः, °अराति, °अशनः (antakaḥ, °arāti, °aśanaḥ)

1) a lion.

2) the Śarabha.

Derivable forms: dviradaḥ (द्विरदः).

Dvirada is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dvi and rada (रद).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dvirada (द्विरद).—m.

(-daḥ) An elephant. E. dvi two, and rada a tooth, having tusks and teeth,

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dvirada (द्विरद).—[adjective] two-toothed; [masculine] elephant.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dvirada (द्विरद):—[=dvi-rada] [from dvi] mfn. 2-tusked, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] m. an elephant, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dvirada (द्विरद):—[dvi-rada] (daḥ) 1. m. An elephant.

[Sanskrit to German]

Dvirada in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Dvirada (ದ್ವಿರದ):—[noun] having two teeth or teeth-like projections.

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Dvirada (ದ್ವಿರದ):—[noun] an elephant that has two tusks.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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