Arunoda, Aruṇodā, Aruṇoda: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Arunoda means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Aruṇoda (अरुणोद) is the name of a lake situated near Mandara, which is the name of a mountain on the eastern side of mount Meru, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 75. Meru is one of the seven mountains located in Jambūdvīpa, which is ruled over by Āgnīdhra, a grandson of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

Around lake Aruṇoda are situated eleven mountains:

  1. Vikaṅka,
  2. Maṇiśṛṅga,
  3. Supātra,
  4. Upala,
  5. Mahānīla,
  6. Kumbha,
  7. Suvindu,
  8. Madana,
  9. Veṇunaddha,
  10. Sumedas,
  11. Niṣadha.
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Aruṇodā (अरुणोदा).—A river flowing through the island of Plakṣa, one of the seven islands of ancient times. The wind around ten yojanas of Plakṣa is very fragrant because it carries the divine fragrance being emitted always from the bodies of Pārvatī and her attendants, who drink water from river Aruṇodā. (Devī Bhāgavata, Aṣṭama Skandha).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Aruṇodā (अरुणोदा).—(River) of celestial mango juice flowing from the top of Mandara and irrigating the eastern part of Ilāvṛta. In this river bathe Yakṣa damsels, who are attendants of Pārvatī.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 16. 17 and 18.

2) Aruṇoda (अरुणोद).—A sacred lake in Meru (in the east, Vāyu-purāṇa) (in Ilāvṛta, Viṣṇu-purāṇa).*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 113. 46; Vāyu-purāṇa 36. 16; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 2. 26.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Arunoda in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdomlib Libary: Kathā

Aruṇoda (अरुणोद) is the name of a water-reservoir in Jambūdvīpa mentioned by Soḍḍhala in his Udayasundarīkathā. Jambūdvīpa is one of the seven continents (dvīpa) of Bhūrloka (earth). The soldiers were asked to seek Udayasundarī around these reservoirs of water.

The Udayasundarīkathā is a Sanskrit work in the campū style, narrating the story of the Nāga princess Udayasundarī and Malayavāhana, king of Pratiṣṭhāna. Soḍḍhala is a descendant of Kalāditya (Śilāditya’s brother) whom he praises as an incarnation of a gaṇa (an attendant of Śiva).

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Aruṇoda (अरुणोद) is the name of an ocean, situated in the “middle world” (madhyaloka), according to chapter 2.3 [ajitanātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly:—“Then the ocean Nandīśvara surrounds Nandīśvara; after that Aruṇadvīpa and Aruṇoda. Then come Aruṇavaradvīpa and the ocean by that name; next Aruṇābhāsa and Aruṇābhāsa Ocean. Then Kuṇḍaladvīpa and the ocean Kuṇḍaloda come next; then Rucakadvīpa and Rucaka Ocean. The oceans and continents with these auspicious names are each twice as large as the preceding one. Of these the last is the ocean Svayambhūramaṇa”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Aruṇoda (अरुणोद):—[from aruṇa] n. Name of a lake, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] of one of the seas surrounding the world, [Jaina literature]

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Aruṇoda (अरुणोद) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Aruṇoda.

[Sanskrit to German]

Arunoda in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Aruṇoda (अरुणोद) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Aruṇoda.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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