Arnava, Arṇava: 22 definitions

Introduction:

Arnava means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Arnav.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Arṇava (अर्णव).—(Arbuda, Wilson); a sacred place. (?)*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa VI. 8. 29.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

Arṇava (अर्णव) refers to one of the eight kinds of daṇḍaka according to Kavikarṇapūra (C. 16th century) in his Vṛttamālā 61. Kavikarṇapūra was an exponent on Sanskrit metrics belongs to Kāmarūpa (modern Assam). Accordingly, “If there exist nine ra-s after two na-s, then it is Arṇava”.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Vedanta (school of philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Studies on the Moksopaya

Arṇava (अर्णव) refers to the “ocean”, according to the 10th century Mokṣopāya or Mokṣopāyaśāstra 6.182.13-17.—Accordingly, “With regard to each of [the three:] perceiver (draṣṭṛ), perception (darśana) and perceived objects (dṛśya), the state of mere knowledge is the essence; therefore there is not in the least a difference from it (i.e. knowledge), like a flower in space (is not different from space). (13) What is of the same kind becomes one. Therefore mutual perception [of things] determines their unity. (14) If wood, stones and other [material objects] did not have knowledge as their nature, then there would be a permanent non-perception of these, which would even be nonexistent. (15) When the whole beauty of perceptible objects has but one form of mere knowledge, then, whether it is different or identical, it becomes known through knowledge. (16) This whole [group of] perceptible objects in the world has expanded [as] mere knowledge, just as wind is mere movement and the ocean [i.e., arṇava] mere water [i.e., jala-mātra]. (17)”.

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Vedanta (वेदान्त, vedānta) refers to a school of orthodox Hindu philosophy (astika), drawing its subject-matter from the Upanishads. There are a number of sub-schools of Vedanta, however all of them expound on the basic teaching of the ultimate reality (brahman) and liberation (moksha) of the individual soul (atman).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Arṇava (अर्णव) refers to the “ocean” (of the six planes), according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “(Jālandhara) is in the southern corner of (Kailāśa). It shines (like) the moon and has the moon’s radiant lustre. Its form is that of the city of the Half Moon. It has deep lakes and rivers full of waves. It contains the ocean of the six planes [i.e., ṣaṭpada-arṇava-saṃkula], and is fearsome (with the many great) waves that wash against its shores. That city of the Supreme Lord is on top of the lord of the principles. It is adorned with snow (white) moonstones and varied enclosing walls, archways, and palaces (aṭṭāla). It possesses many qualities and wonders. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Arṇava (अर्णव) refers to the “ocean”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 2), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “We shall now proceed to give a brief description of (the qualifications of) a jyotiṣaka. [...] The predictions of one, who knows astronomy well, who is able to calculate the exact Lagna with such helps as the shadow, water and astronomical instruments and who is well-versed in horoscopy will never fail. Viṣṇugupta says—‘Flying with the speed of the wind, one might find it possible to cross to the ocean’s [i.e., arṇava] opposite shore; but a non-Ṛṣi can never, even mentally, reach the opposite shore of the vast ocean of Jvotiṣa-śāstra’.”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Arṇava (अर्णव) refers to a “(great) ocean” (of excellent virtues), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “This self itself is clearly a great ocean of excellent virtues (guṇaratna-mahā-arṇava). It is all-knowing, all-pervading, having all forms, supreme [and] pure”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Arṇava.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘four’. Note: arṇava is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

arṇava (अर्णव).—m S The ocean: also a sea.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

arṇava (अर्णव).—m The ocean, a sea.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Arṇava (अर्णव).—a. Being agitated, foaming, restless (Ved.); full of water (Sāy.); ततः समुद्रो अर्णवः (tataḥ samudro arṇavaḥ) Sandhyā; यात्येव यमुना पूर्णं समुद्रमुदकार्णवम् (yātyeva yamunā pūrṇaṃ samudramudakārṇavam) Rām.2.15.19.

-vaḥ [arṇāṃsi santi yasmin, arṇas-va salopaḥ P.V.2.19 Vārt.]

1) A stream, flood, wave.

2) The (foaming) sea, ocean; पराहतः शैल इवार्णवाम्बुभिः (parāhataḥ śaila ivārṇavāmbubhiḥ) Kirātārjunīya 14.1. (fig. also), Bhāgavata 4. 22.4; शोक° (śoka°) ocean of grief; so चिन्ता° (cintā°); जन° (jana°) ocean of men; संसारार्णवलङ्घनम् (saṃsārārṇavalaṅghanam) Bhartṛhari 3.1. &c. also नृणामेको गम्यस्त्वमसि पयसामर्णव इवशिवमहिम्रस्तोत्र (nṛṇāmeko gamyastvamasi payasāmarṇava ivaśivamahimrastotra) of पुष्पदन्ताचार्य (puṣpadantācārya).

3) The ocean of air.

4) Name of a metre.

5) Name of the sun or Indra (as givers of water).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Ārṇava (आर्णव).—adj. (perhaps = Pali aṇṇava as epithet of saraṃ, see Critical Pali Dictionary), of the ocean: °vaṃ saraḥ MPS 7.9; Udānavarga xvii.7.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Arṇava (अर्णव).—m.

(-vaḥ) The ocean. E. arṇas water, va affix, and sa is dropped: the ṇa in this and similar words is optionally doubled, as arṇṇava, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Arṇava (अर्णव).— (from arṇa, ved. by aff. va for vant), m. The ocean, [Rāmāyaṇa] 4, 9, 38.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Arṇava (अर्णव).—[adjective] waving, undulating, rising. [masculine] ([neuter]) = seq.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Arṇava (अर्णव) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—[dharma] Oppert. Ii, 5160. See Kṛtyatattvārṇava, Smṛtimahārṇava.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Arṇava (अर्णव):—[from arṇa] mfn. agitated, foaming, restless, [Ṛg-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā; Atharva-veda]

2) [v.s. ...] m. a wave, flood, [Ṛg-veda]

3) [v.s. ...] the foaming sea, [Ṛg-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā]

4) [v.s. ...] the ocean of air (sometimes personified as a demon with the epithet mahān or ta nayitnus), [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda]

5) [v.s. ...] mn. (as, rarely am [Mahābhārata xiii, 7362]) the sea

6) [v.s. ...] (hence) the number, ‘four’ [Sūryasiddhānta]

7) [v.s. ...] Name of two metres (cf. arṇa, m.), Name of [work] on jurisprudence.

8) Ārṇava (आर्णव):—mfn. come from the sea, [Naiṣadha-carita]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Arṇava (अर्णव):—(vaḥ) 1. m. The ocean.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Arṇava (अर्णव) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Aṇṇava.

[Sanskrit to German]

Arnava in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Arṇava (अर्णव) [Also spelled arnav]:—(nm) a sea, an ocean.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Arṇava (ಅರ್ಣವ):—

1) [noun] the vast body of water covering about two-thirds of the surface of the globe or any one of its principal divisions, the Antarctic, Atlantic, Arctic, Indian and Pacific Oceans.

2) [noun] (pros.) a meter, in which each of the four feet, has two ನಗಣ [nagana]s (each having 3 short syllables 'uuu') and nine ರಗಣ [ragana]s (each having two long and one short syllables ('-u-').

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Arnava (ಅರ್ನವ):—[noun] the vast body of water covering about two-thirds of the surface of the globe or any one of its principal divisions, the Antarctic, Atlantic, Arctic, Indian and Pacific Oceans.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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