Vedi, Vedī: 17 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Vedi means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Vedī (वेदी).—Wife of Brahmā. (Mahābhārata Udyoga Parva, Chapter 117, Verse 10).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Vedi (वेदि).—A river served by the Siddhas.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 13. 81.

1b) One of the ten pīṭhas for images, oblong; unfit for installing lingas; this gives abundant riches.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 262. 6, 17.

1c) (also Veditalam) the place of the fire altar in the sacrifice.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 60; 97. 25.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Vedī (वेदी) refers to the name of a Tīrtha (pilgrim’s destination) mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. III.81). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Vedī) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

Vedi (वेदि) refers to “sacrificial altar” to be build by the sthapati, in the center of the yāgamaṇḍapa, according to the Mānasāra chapter 70 (“chiselling the eyes of the image”).

Source: Google Books: Indian Temple Architecture: Form and Transformation

Vedī (वेदी).—A type of moulding common to both the prastara (parapet) and adhiṣṭhana (plinth);—Vedī or vedikā means ‘railing’, and the moulding occurs, like a vestigial balustrade, as a course above the floor slab level and the plinth proper. The vedī moulding in parapets (prastara) is also derived from a railing. Although this origin is not evident in examples from Karnataka, it becomes clear if the parapet details of the Pallava monuments at Mahabalipuram are compared with the images of timber and thatch buildings shown in earlier Buddhist reliefs.

Vedī also means altar, another connotation of the table-like moulding, particularly as ‘high altar’ at the summit. The coincidence of railing and altar brings to mind the railed harmikā, the ‘high altar’ of a stūpa.

Source: Shodhganga: Temples of Salem region Up to 1336 AD

Vedi (वेदि) is a platform to support the grīva and the śikhara. Vedi is constructed like any other constructions in stone or brick and mortar, above the final tala of the prāsāda. Vedi, on plan, always corresponds to the plan of the grīva and the śikhara. The body of the vedi may have bhittipādas and the top of the vedi will have a stringcourse or a vājana.

Source: Knowledge Traditions & Practices of India: Architecture (1): Early and Classical Architecture

Vedi (वेदि) refers to a “Vedic sacrificial altar”, a concept defined within the ancient Indian “science of architecture” (vāstuvidyā).—The origin of Indian temple architecture can be traced to Vedic times. The square shape of the vedi (Vedic sacrificial altar) inspired the basic design of temples. The Indian shrine depicted in early bas-reliefs at Bharhut, Sanchi, Mathura and Amravati, has a small square altar, often enclosed by a vedikā (square railing) and shaded by a tree or a chattra (parasol).

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Vedi.—(EI 32), a seat; also a raised platform (cf. vedikā). See JBRS, Vol. XXXIX, Parts 1-2, pp. 43-44, 47; Ep. Ind., Vol. XXXV, p. 192. Note: vedi is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

vedi : (aor. of vidati) knows. || vedī (f.) a platform; a railing.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Vedi, & Vedī (f.) (Vedic vedi sacrificial bench) ledge, cornice, rail Mhvs 32, 5; 35, 2; 36, 52 (pāsāṇa°); 36, 103; Vv 8416 (=vedikā VvA. 346).—See on term Dial. II. 210; Mhvs. tsrln 220, 296. Cp. vedikā & velli. (Page 648)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vēdi (वेदि).—, or vēdikā f S A plat or raised ground on which sacrifices or oblations are offered. 2 A border around the kuṇḍa (the pit) or the level area of a place of sacrifice. 3 A defined space (as in the yard of a temple &c.) on which a raised mass is made, serving as an altar; a seat for the vessels used in oblations &c; a stand for idols to be placed and worshiped.

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vēdī (वेदी).—, or vēdikā f S A plat or raised ground on which sacrifices or oblations are offered. 2 A border around the kuṇḍa (the pit) or the level area of a place of sacrifice. 3 A defined space (as in the yard of a temple &c.) on which a raised mass is made, serving as an altar; a seat for the vessels used in oblations &c; a stand for idols to be placed and worshiped.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vēdi (वेदि).—f An altar.

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vēdī (वेदी).—f An altar.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vedi (वेदि).—[vid-in] A learned man, sage; Paṇḍita.

-diḥ, -dī f.

1) An altar, especially one prepared for a sacrifice; उर एव वेदिः (ura eva vediḥ) Ch. Up.5.18.2; अमी वेदिं परितः क्लृप्त- धिष्ण्याः (amī vediṃ paritaḥ klṛpta- dhiṣṇyāḥ) (vahvayaḥ) Ś.4.8.

2) An altar of a particular shape, the middle points of which come very close to each other; मध्येन सा वेदिविलग्नमध्या (madhyena sā vedivilagnamadhyā) Ku.1.39; (some propose to take vedi in this passage as meaning 'a sealring').

3) A quadrangular spot in the court-yard of a temple or palace; विमानं नवमुद्वेदि चतुःस्तम्भप्रतिष्ठितम् (vimānaṃ navamudvedi catuḥstambhapratiṣṭhitam) (kalpayāmāsuḥ) R.17.9.

4) A seal-ring.

5) Name of Sarasvatī.

6) A tract or region.

Derivable forms: vediḥ (वेदिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vedi (वेदि).—f. (-diḥ-dī) 1. Ground for placing the vessels used at an oblation, or for binding the victim, or lighting the sacrificial fire; it is more or less raised and of various shapes; an alter, &c. 2. A quadrangular spot in the court-yard of a temple or palace, usually furnished with a raised floor or seat, and covered with a roof supported by pillars: see vitarddi. 3. A seal-ring. m.

(-diḥ) A Pandit, a teacher. f.

(-diḥ) A name of Saraswati. E. vid to know, &c., Unadi aff. in, and ṅīṣ optionally added in the fem. form.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vedi (वेदि).—vedī [I.] and vedī, f. 1. Ground prepared for sacrifice, an altar, [Śākuntala, (ed. Böhtlingk.)] 31, 6; [Nala] 1, 9; [Rāmāyaṇa] 1, 21, 5. 2. A quadrangular spot in the court-yard of a temple or palace, usually furnished with a raised floor or seat, and covered with a roof supported by pillars, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 4, 25, 16. 3. A bench, ib. 3, 23, 17. 4. A seal-ring. Ii. vedi vedi, 1. m. A teacher. 2. f. Sarasvatī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vedi (वेदि).—[feminine] the sacrificial bed or altar (excavated in the ground and covered with grass or straw); i.[grammar] support, pedestal, bench.

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Vedī (वेदी).—[feminine] the sacrificial bed or altar (excavated in the ground and covered with grass or straw); i.[grammar] support, pedestal, bench.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vedi (वेदि):—[from veda] 1. vedi m. a wise man, teacher, Paṇḍit, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] f. knowledge, science (See a-v)

3) [v.s. ...] a seal-ring (also dikā), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Vedī (वेदी):—[from vedi > veda] a f. Name of Sarasvatī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Vedi (वेदि):—[from veda] 2. vedi in [compound] for 1. vedin.

6) [from veda] 3. vedi f. (later also vedī; for 1. 2. See [column]2) an elevated (or according to some excavated) piece of ground serving for a sacrificial altar (generally strewed with Kuśa grass, and having receptacles for the sacrificial fire; it is more or less raised and of various shapes, but usually narrow in the middle, on which account the female waist is often compared to it), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

7) [v.s. ...] the space between the supposed spokes of a wheel-shaped altar, [Śulba-sūtra]

8) [v.s. ...] a kind of covered verandah or balcony in a court-yard (shaped like a Vedi and prepared for weddings etc. = vitardi), [Kāvya literature; Kathāsaritsāgara]

9) [v.s. ...] a stand, basis, pedestal, bench, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

10) [v.s. ...] Name of a Tīrtha, [Mahābhārata] (only ī)

11) [v.s. ...] n. a species of plant (= ambaṣṭha),

12) Vedī (वेदी):—[from veda] b See under 1. and 3. vedi.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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