Uttariya, Uttarīya: 21 definitions

Introduction:

Uttariya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Uttariy.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय, “upper garment”) refers to one of the five kinds of external marks of an ācārya (“Śaiva preceptor”), according to Nigamajñāna (Śaiva teacher of the 16th century) in his Śaivāgamaparibhāṣāmañjarī.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Uttariya in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय) refers to the “piece of cloth to be worn on the upper part of the body” and is mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa 1.20 while explaining the mode of worshipping an earthen phallic image (pārthiva-liṅga) according to the Vedic rites:—“[...] the tying of the waistband (kaṭibandhana) shall be performed devoutly with the mantra ‘Mā nastoke’ etc. The piece of cloth to be worn on the upper part of the body (uttarīya) shall be offered with the mantra ‘Namo Dhṛṣṇave’ etc. The pious follower of Vedic rites shall make an offering of cloth (vastrasamarpaṇa) duly to Śiva with the four hymns beginning with ‘‘Yā te heti’ etc.”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Shodhganga: Vaisnava Agamas And Visnu Images

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय) refers to a “long scarf-like cloth” and represents a type of “ornamental garment” (vastra), as defined in treatises such as the Pāñcarātra, Pādmasaṃhitā and Vaikhānasa-āgamas, extensively dealing with the technical features of temple art, iconography and architecture in Vaishnavism.—Uttarīya is another type of elegant cloth worn over the upper body. Banerjea calls it Āṅgiyā denoting royal aspect. In three icons of Viṣṇu under study, Uttarīya is shown as a thin and broad strip beneath Yajñopavīta running across the chest from left to right. In most of the icons, Uttarīya is shown on the waist with the sashes falling on the sides.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय):—Resembles sacred thread wore by Brahmans in India, generally wore by bramhins

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय) refers to an “upper garment”, according to the Brahmayāmala verse 21.14ab.—The renouncer in Vedic times wore ochre coloured clothes. This practice continues amongst Śaiva renouncers who attribute the origin of their orders to Śaṅkarācārya. Vaiṣṇava renouncers, who in their outer appearance resemble in many respects their Śaiva counterparts, generally wear white. Modern Śākta renouncers wear red clothes. A similar practice is recorded in the Brahmayāmala, a text that may well belong to the seventh or eighth century. In one of a series of vows (vrata) described there, the initiate may chose to perform he should wear “black and red clothes and no upper garment [i.e., uttarīya-vivarjita]”. Another prescribes that: “wearing red clothes, a red garland and (smeared with) unguent, he has red ornaments and holds an ascetic's staff. In particular, he should always carry a skull and a double-headed drum”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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India history and geography

Source: What is India: Inscriptions of the Vākāṭakas

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय) refers to an “upper garment”, commonly worn during the reign of the Vākāṭakas (mid-3rd century CE).—Ajaṇṭā paintings give us a clear idea of the costume and jewellery worn by men and women in Vidarbha in the age of the Vākāṭakas. Most of them are shown dressed in a short antarīyaka or lower garment. As it did not cover the knees, it was called ardhoruka. [...]  Men usually wore an upper garment (uttarīya) which, like the sacred thread, went over the left shoulder and below the right arm pit. This mode of wearing it kept the right arm free for movement. In some paintings the uttarīya is seen turned over on the left shoulder. Some persons used to fold it and wore it as a vaikakṣaka across their breast. Some others took a long cloth and used it both as a lower and an upper garment. In some cases we find the uttarīya worn over a long-sleeved coat.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Uttariya in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

uttarīya : (nt.) a cloak.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Uttarīya, (nt.) (fr. uttara) an outer garment, cloak PvI. 103 (= uparivasanaṃ uparihāraṃ uttarisāṭakaṃ PvA. 49); Dāvs III, 30; ThA. 253. (Page 131)

— or —

Uttariya, (nt.) (abstr. fr. uttara; uttara + ya = Sk. *uttarya) — 1. state of being higher. Cp. III, 35; neg. an° state of being unsurpassed (lit. with nothing higher), preeminence; see anuttariya.—2. an answer, rejoinder DhA. I, 44 (karaṇ°-karaṇa). (Page 131)

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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

uttarīya (उत्तरीय).—n S A cloth to be cast over the shoulders. Ex. sva uttarīyāvara tyā samājīṃ || bāndhōniyā cāpa tyāsa mājīṃ || 2 Used also in the senses of uttarī.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

uttarīya (उत्तरीय).—n A cloth to be cast over the shoulders.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय).—[uttara-cha-vā-kap] An upper garment; स्तनोत्तरीयाणि भवन्ति सङ्गान्निर्मोकपट्टाः फणिभिर्विमुक्ताः (stanottarīyāṇi bhavanti saṅgānnirmokapaṭṭāḥ phaṇibhirvimuktāḥ) R.16.17.43.

See also (synonyms): uttarīyaka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय).—n.

(-yaṃ) An upper or outer garment. E. uttara upper, and cha aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय).—i. e. uttara + īya, and uttarīyaka uttarīya + ka, n. An upper and outer garment, [Pañcatantra] 236, 9.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Uttarīya (उत्तरीय):—[from ut-tama] n. an upper or outer garment, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Pāraskara-gṛhya-sūtra; Hiraṇyakeśin-gṛhya-sūtra; Mahābhārata; Pañcatantra] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] a blanket, [Caraka]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय):—(yaṃ) 1. n. Upper garment.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Uttarijja, Uttariya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Uttariya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Uttariya in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Uttarīya (उत्तरीय) [Also spelled uttariy]:—(a) northern; (nm) the upper or outer garment.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Uttariya (उत्तरिय) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Uttarīya.

Uttariya has the following synonyms: Uttarijja.

2) Uttariya (उत्तरिय) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Uttīrṇa.

3) Uttariya (उत्तरिय) also relates to the Sanskrit words: Auttarika, Auttarāha.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Uttarīya (ಉತ್ತರೀಯ):—[noun] a loose long cloth to cover the upper portion of the body or worn loosely above the upper garment.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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