Ekavasana, aka: Ekāvasānā, Eka-vasana; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Ekavasana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Ekāvasānā (एकावसाना) refers to one of the varieties of the catuṣpadā type of song, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 31. Accordingly, “the catuṣpadā song, of which one pāda ends with half of the varṇas, is called ekāvasānā. It should have only long and short syllables in the previous pāda”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ekavasana in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [E] · next »

Ekavasana (एकवसन).—a. having only one garment, in one dress (without uttarīya).

-stram a single garment.

Ekavasana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms eka and vasana (वसन). See also (synonyms): ekavastra.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 816 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Vasana
Vasana (वसन).—m., ardent desire, passion, attachment: °naḥ Mvy 7534 (so also Mironov) = Tibetan...
Eka
Eka (एक, “one”) is the first of sixty digits (decimal place) in an special enumeration system m...
Ekapada
Ekapāda (एकपाद).—In iconography, ekapāda does not come under the heading sthānaka, but is found...
Ekanta
Ekānta (एकान्त) refers to “absolutistic attitude” and represents one of the five types of ...
Ekacakra
Ekacakra (एकचक्र).—m. (-kraḥ) The name of a city: see harigṛha. E. eka, cakra a circle.
Ekata
Ekatā (एकता).—f. (-tā) Unity, oneness. E. eka and tal affix. or with tva aff. ekatva n. (-tvaṃ)
Ekavali
Ekāvalī (एकावली).—f. (-lī) A single string of beads, flowers, &c. E. eka and āvalī a row.
Ekakshara
Ekākṣarā (एकाक्षरा) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.24). ...
Ekacara
Ekacara (एकचर).—mfn. (-raḥ-rā-rī-raṃ) 1. Solitary, alone. 2. Having one follower. m. (-raḥ) A r...
Ekaksha
1) Ekākṣa (एकाक्ष).—A demon born to Kaśyapaprajāpati of his wife Danu. (Śloka 29, Chapter 65, Ā...
Ekadesha
Ekadeśa (एकदेश).—m. (-śaḥ) A part, a portion, a division. E. eka and deśa place.
Naika
Naika (नैक).—mfn. (-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) Many, various. E. na neg. eka one.
Ekavidha
Ekavidha (एकविध).—a. of one kind; simple. Ekavidha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the te...
Ekadanta
Ekadanta (एकदन्त).—m. (-ntaḥ) A name of Ganesa: see the preceding. E. eka and danta a tooth.
Ekarupa
Ekarūpa (एकरूप) refers to one of the 135 metres (chandas) mentioned by Nañjuṇḍa (1794-1868 C.E....

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