Panna, aka: Paṇṇa, Paññā, Pañña; 12 Definition(s)

Introduction

Panna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Discernment; insight; wisdom; intelligence; common sense; ingenuity. One of the ten perfections (paramis).Source: Access to Insight: A Glossary of Pali and Buddhist Terms

T Wisdom.

Source: Dhamma Dana: Pali English Glossary

Part of the Sobhana Cetasikas. In the 25 sobhana cetasikas or beautiful mental factors, the last to be mentioned but the most important is panna or pannindriya cetasikas. He is the Prime Minister for the king citta. It helps citta to see and to realise things in depth. It has a power of realization. It has a power of analysis and penetration. It has a good insight into the matter in question. If this cetasika is present and functioning well all other accompanying cetasikas work well and all are well organized. This cetasika is like a wise man or a wise minister that present the pros and cons of everything to the king citta.

This cetasika is the chief of all cetasikas in rupa and arupa jhana cittas, magga cittas, and phala cittas. Without this panna cetasika there will not be any of jhana or magga or phala citta.

Source: Journey to Nibbana: Patthana Dhama

Insight:—cf. paññā, vipassanā, ñāna.

Source: Pali Kanon: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines

'understanding, knowledge, wisdom, insight', comprises a very wide field. The specific Buddhist knowledge or wisdom, however, as part of the Noble Eightfold Path (magga, q.v.) to deliverance, is insight (vipassanā, q.v.), i.e. that intuitive knowledge which brings about the 4 stages of holiness and the realization of Nibbāna (s. ariyapuggala), and which consists in the penetration of the impermanency (anicca, q.v.), misery (dukkha, s. sacca) and impersonality (anattā) of all forms of existence. Further details, s. under tilakkhana.

With regard to the condition of its arising one distinguishes 3 kinds of knowledge knowledge based on thinking (cintā-mayā-paññā), knowledge based on learning (suta-mayā-paññā), knowledge based on mental development (bhāvanā-mayā-paññā) (D. 33).

" 'Based on thinking' is that knowledge which one has accquired through one's own thinking, without having learnt it from others. 'Based on learning' is that knowledge which one has heard from others and thus acquired through learning. 'Based on mental development' is that knowledge which one has acquired through mental development in this or that way, and which has reached the stage of full concentration" (appanā, q.v.) (Vis.M. XIV).

Wisdom is one of the 5 mental faculties (s. bala), one of the 3 kinds of training (sikkhā, q.v.), and one of the perfections (s. pāramī) For further details, s. vipassanā, and the detailed exposition in Vis.M. XIV, 1-32.

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paññā.

Source: Pali Kanon: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Discover the meaning of panna in the context of Theravada from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Buddhism)

1. There are three kinds of Prajna:

  1. Prajna of language.
  2. Prajna of contemplative illumination.
  3. Prajna of the characteristics of actuality.

The last one is the ultimate wisdom, which is the wisdom of Buddha. Also see wisdom.

2. The highest of Paramita; the virtue of wisdom as the principal means of attaining Nirvana. It connotes a knowledge of the illusory character of everything earthly, and destroys error, ignorance, prejudice and heresy.

Source: Buddhist Door: Glossary

(pan nyah) discriminative wisdom.

Source: Amaravati: Glossary

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Panna in Pali glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

pañña : (adj.) wise; endowed with knowledge. (in cpds.). || paññā (f.) wisdom; knowledge; insight.

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panna : (adj.) fallen; gone down.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Paññā, (f.) (cp. Vedic prajñā, pa+jñā) intelligence, comprising all the higher faculties of cognition, “intellect as conversant with general truths” (Dial. II. 68), reason, wisdom, insight, knowledge, recognition. See on term Mrs. Rh. D. “Buddhism” (1914) pp. 94, 130, 201; also Cpd. 40, 41, 102 and discussion of term at Dhs. trsl. 17, 339, cp. scholastic definition with all the synonyms of intellectual attainment at Nd2 380=Dhs. 16 (paññā pajānanā vicayo etc.). As tt. in Buddhist Psych. Ethics it comprises the highest and last stage as 3rd division in the standard “Code of religious practice” which leads to Arahantship or Final Emancipation. These 3 stages are: (1) sīla-kkhandha (or °sampadā), code of moral duties; (2) samādhi-kkhandha (or cittasampadā) code of emotional duties or practice of con centration & meditation; (3) paññā-kkhandha (or °sampadā) code of intellectual duties or practice of the attainment of highest knowledge. (See also jhāna1.) They are referred to in almost every Suttanta of Dīgha 1. (given in extenso at D. I, 62—85) and frequently mentioned elsewhere, cp. D. II, 81, 84, 91 (see khandha, citta & sīla).—D. I, 26=162 (°gatena caranti diṭṭhigatāni), 174 (°vāda), 195 (°pāripūrin); II, 122 (ariyā); III, 101, 158, 164, 183, 230, 237, 242, 284 sq.; S. I, 13=165 (sīla, citta, paññā), 17, 34, 55; II, 185 (sammā°), 277; V, 222 (ariyā); M. I, 144 (id.); III, 99 (id.), 245 (paramā), 272 (sammā°); A. I, 61, 216; II, 1 (ariyā); IV, 105 (id.); III, 106 (sīla, citta, p.), 352 (kusalesu dhammesu); IV, 11 (id.); V, 123 sq.; It. 35, 40 (°uttara), 51 (sīla~samādhi p. ca), 112 (ariyā°); Sn. 77, 329, 432, 881, 1036 and passim; Dh. 38, 152, 372; Nd1 77; Nd2 380; Ps. I, 53, 64 sq. , 71 sq. , 102 sq. , 119; II, 150 sq. , 162, 185 sq.; Pug. 25, 35, 54 (°sampadā); Dhs. 16, 20, 555; Nett 8, 15, 17, 28, 54, 191; VbhA. 140, 396; PvA. 40 (paññāya abhāvato for lack of reason); Sdhp. 343. On paññāya see sep. article. See also adhipanna (adhisīla, adhicitta+).

—âdhipateyya the supremacy of wisdom A. II, 137. —indriya the faculty of reason (with sati° & samādhi°) D. III, 239, 278; Dhs. 16, 20 etc.; Nett. 7, 15 sq; 191. —obhāsa the lustre of wisdom Ps. I, 119; Dhs. 16, 20 etc. —kkhandha the code of cognition (see above) Vin. I, 62; D. III, 229, 279; It. 51; Nd1 21; Nett 70, 90, 128. It is always combd with sīla° & samādhi-kkhandha. —cakkhu the eye of wisdom (one of the 5 kinds of extraordinary sight of a Buddha: see under cakkhumant) D. III, 219; S. V, 467; It. 52; Nd1 354; Nd2 235. —dada giving or bestowing wisdom S. I, 33; Sn. 177. —dhana the treasure of perfect knowledge (one of the 7 treasures, see dhana) D. III, 163, 251; A. III, 53; VvA. 113. —nirodhika tending to the destruction of reason S. V, 97; It. 82. —paṭilābha acquisition of wisdom S. V, 411; A. I, 45; Ps. II, 189. —pāsāda the stronghold of supreme knowledge Dh. 28 (=dibba-cakkhuṃ saṅkhātaṃ °ṃ). —bala the power of reason or insight, one of the 5 powers D. III, 229, 253; M. III, 72; A. IV, 363; Sn. 212; Dhs. 16, 20 etc.; Nett 54, 191; VvA. 7. —bāhulla wealth or plenty of wisdom S. V, 411; A. I, 45. —bhūmi ground or stage of wisdom; a name given to the Paṭicca-samuppāda by Bdhgh at Vism. XVII, pp. 517 sq. (°niddesa). —ratana the gem of reason or knowledge Dhs. 16, 20 etc. —vimutta freed by reason D. II, 70; III, 105, 254; M. I, 35, 477; A. I, 61; II, 6; IV, 452; Sn. 847; Nd1 207; Kvu 58; Nett 199. —vimutti emancipation through insight or knowledge (always paired with ceto-vimutti) D. I, 156, 167; III, 78, 102, 108, 132, 281; It. 75, 91; Sn. 725, 727; Nett 7, 40, 81, 127; DA. I, 313; VbhA. 464. —visuddhi purity of insight D. III, 288. —vuddhi increase of knowledge S. V, 97, 411; A. I, 15, 45; II, 245. —sampadā the blessing of higher knowledge (see above) A. I, 62; II, 66; III, 12 sq. , 182 sq.; IV, 284, 322. —sīla conduct and (higher) intelligence Dh. 229 (°samāhita=lokuttarapaññāya c’eva pārisuddhisīlena ca samannāgata DhA. III, 329); Vv 3423 id. =ariyāya diṭṭhiyā ariyena sīlena ca sāmannāgata VvA. 155). Often used with yathābhūtaṃ q. v. Cp. paññāya. (Page 390)

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Paṇṇa, (nt.) (Ved. parṇa, cp. Ags. fearn, E. fern) 1. a leaf (esp. betel leaf) Vin. I, 201 (5 kinds of leaves recommended for medicinal purposes, viz. nimba° Azadirachta Indica, kuṭaja° Wrightia antidysenterica, paṭola° Tricho‹-› Qanthes dioeca, sulasi° or tulasi° basil, kappāsika° cotton, see Vin. Texts II. 46) A. I, 183 (tiṇa+) Sn. 811 (p. vuccati paduma-pattaṃ Nd1 135); J. I, 167; II, 105 (nimba)°; KhA 46 (khitta-p. -kosa-saṇṭhāna); PvA. 115 (=patta) tālapaṇṇa a fan of palm leaves Vv 3343 (=tālapattehi kata-maṇḍala-vījanī VvA. 147); haritapaṇṇa greens, vegetable SnA 283; sūpeyyapaṇṇa curry leaf J. I, 98.—2. a leaf for writing upon, written leaf, letter; donation, bequest (see below paṇṇākāra) J. I, 409 (cp. paṭipaṇṇa); II, 104; IV, 151 (ucchaṅgato p. °ṃ nīharati); DhA. I, 180; PvA. 20 (likhā° written message). paṇṇaṃ āropeti to send a letter J. I, 227; pahiṇati id. J. IV, 145; V, 458; peseti id. J. I, 178; IV, 169. paṇṇaṃ likhati to write a letter J. II, 174; VI, 369 (paṇṇe wrote on a leaf), 385 iṇa° a promissory note J. I, 230; IV, 256.—p. as ticket or label at DhsA. 110.—3. a feather, wing see su°.

—ākāra “state or condition of writing” (see ākāra 1), i.e. object of writing; that which is connected or sent with a letter, a special message, donation, present, gift J. I, 377; II, 166; III, 10; IV, 316, 368; VI, 68, 390; SnA 78; DhA . 184 326, 392, 339: II. 80; III, 292 (dasavidha dibba°, viz. āyu etc. : see ṭhāna); IV, 11. —kuṭi a hut of leaves D. III, 94; S. I, 226; J. II, 44; Pv III, 220; DA. I, 318. —chatta a fan of leaves J. II, 277. —chattaka a leaf-awning S. I, 90, 92. —dhāra a holder made of leaves J. V, 205. —pacchi leaf-basket, a b. for greens J. VI, 369. —puṭa a palm-leaf basket PvA. 168. —saññā a mark of leaves (tied up to mark the boundary of a field) J. I, 153. —santhāra a spreading leaf, leaf cover, adj. spread with leaves A. I, 136; J. VI, 24. —sālā a hut of leaves, a hermitage J. I, 6, 7, 138; II, 101 sq.; VI, 30, 318 (nala-bhittikaṃ °ṃ katvā); VI, 24. —susa (& sosa) drying the leaves (said of the wind) KhA 15. (Page 404)

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Panna, (pp. of pajjati but not satisfactorily expld as such, for pajjati & panna never occur by themselves, but only in cpds. like āpajjati, āpanna, upp°, upa°, sam°, etc. Besides, the word is only given in lexic. literature as pp. of pajjati, although a tendency prevails to regard it as pp. of patati. The meaning points more to the latter, but in form it cannot belong to pat. A more satisfactory expln (in meaning and form) is to regard panna as pp. of pa+nam, with der. fr. short base. Thus panna would stand for panata (paṇata), as unna for unnata, ninna for ninnata, the double nn to be accounted for on analogy. The meaning would thus be “bent down, laid down, ” as panna-ga= going bent, panna-dhaja=flag bent or laid down, etc. Perhaps patta of patta-kkhandha should belong here as panna°) fallen, gone, gone down; also: creeping, only in foll. cpds. :

—ga a snake Th. 1, 429 (°inda chief of snake-demons); J. V, 166; Miln. 23. —gandha with gone down (i.e. deteriorated) smell, ill-smelling, or having lost its smell J. V, 198 (=thokaṃ duggandha C.). —dhaja one whose flag gone or is lost, i.e. whose fight is over (Ep. of the Buddha), cp. BSk. prapātito māna-dhvajaḥ Lal. V, 448 (with derivation from pat instead of pad, cp. papātana) M. I, 139 sq. , 386; A. III, 84 sq.; in eulogy on the Buddha (see exegesis to mahesi Nd1 343; Nd2 503) reference is made to mānadhaja (°papātanaṃ) which is opposed to dhamma-dhaja (-ussapana); thus we should explain as “one who has put down the flag of pride. ” —bhāra one who has put down his burden, one whose load has gone, who is delivered or saved M. I, 139; A. III, 84; S. I, 233; Dh. 402 (=ohitakhandha-bhāra DhA. IV, 168); Sn. 626, 914 (cp Nd1 334); Th. 1, 1021. —bhūmi state of one who has fallen DA. I, 103 (opp. to jina-bhūmi, one of the 8 purisa-bhūmiyo.—cp. D. I, 54 & Dial. I. 722). —loma one whose hairs have fallen or are put down (flat, i.e. do not stand erect in consequence of excitement), subdued, pacified (opp. haṭṭha loma) Vin. II, 184 (cp. Vin. II, 5 & Bdhgh on p. 309 lomaṃ pāteti, Bdhgh pādeti; also Vin. Texts II. 339); III, 266; M. I, 450; J. I, 377. Another form is palloma (q. v. & cp. J. P. T. S. 1889, 206). See also remarks on parada-vutta. (Page 412)

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Pañña, (-°) (adj.) (the adj. form of paññā) of wisdom, endowed with knowledge or insight, possessed of the highest cognition, in foll. cpds. : anissaraṇa° D. I, 245; S. II, 194; IV, 332; anoma° Sn. 343; appa° S. I, 198; J. II, 166; III, 223, 263; avakujja° A. I, 130; gambhīra° S. I, 190; javana° S. I, 63; Nd2 235; tikkha°; dup° D. III, 252, 282; S. I, 78, 191; II, 159 sq.; M. III, 25; A. II, 187 sq.; Dh. 111, 140; Pug. 13; DhA. II, 255; nibbedhika° S. I, 63; A. II, 178; Nd2 235; puṭhu° ibid.; bhāvita° S. IV, 111; A. V, 42 sq.; bhūri° S. III, 143; IV, 205; manda° VbhA. 239; mahā° S. I, 63, 121; II, 155; A. I, 23, 25; II, 178 sq.; Nd2 235; SnA 347; sap° S. I, 13, 22, 212; IV, 210; A. IV, 245; Pv I 88; 115; PvA. 60 (=paṇḍita), 131 (+buddhimant); suvimutta° A. V, 29 sq.; hāsa° S. I, 63, 191; V, 376; Nd2 235. By itself (i.e. not in cpd.) only at Dh. 208 (=lokiyalokuttara-paññāya sampanna DhA. III, 172) and 375 (=paṇḍita DhA. IV, 111). (Page 389)

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Pañña, (-°) (adj.) (the adj. form of paññā) of wisdom, endowed with knowledge or insight, possessed of the highest cognition, in foll. cpds. : anissaraṇa° D. I, 245; S. II, 194; IV, 332; anoma° Sn. 343; appa° S. I, 198; J. II, 166; III, 223, 263; avakujja° A. I, 130; gambhīra° S. I, 190; javana° S. I, 63; Nd2 235; tikkha°; dup° D. III, 252, 282; S. I, 78, 191; II, 159 sq.; M. III, 25; A. II, 187 sq.; Dh. 111, 140; Pug. 13; DhA. II, 255; nibbedhika° S. I, 63; A. II, 178; Nd2 235; puṭhu° ibid.; bhāvita° S. IV, 111; A. V, 42 sq.; bhūri° S. III, 143; IV, 205; manda° VbhA. 239; mahā° S. I, 63, 121; II, 155; A. I, 23, 25; II, 178 sq.; Nd2 235; SnA 347; sap° S. I, 13, 22, 212; IV, 210; A. IV, 245; Pv I 88; 115; PvA. 60 (=paṇḍita), 131 (+buddhimant); suvimutta° A. V, 29 sq.; hāsa° S. I, 63, 191; V, 376; Nd2 235. By itself (i.e. not in cpd.) only at Dh. 208 (=lokiyalokuttara-paññāya sampanna DhA. III, 172) and 375 (=paṇḍita DhA. IV, 111). (Page 389)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

pannā (पन्ना).—m (pannaga S) An emerald.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

pannā (पन्ना).—m An emerald.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Panna (पन्न).—p. p. [pad-kta]

1) Fallen, sunk, gone down, descended.

2) Gone; see पद् (pad).

-nnam 1 Downward motion; descent, fall.

2) Creeping on the ground.

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Panna (पन्न).—See under पद् (pad).

See also (synonyms): pannaga.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 266 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Pannaga
Pannaga (पन्नग) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as ...
Panna Sutta
Paññā, (f.) (cp. Vedic prajñā, pa+jñā) intelligence, comprising all the higher faculties of cog...
Panna Vagga
Pañña, (-°) (adj.) (the adj. form of paññā) of wisdom, endowed with knowledge or insight, posse...
Panna Jataka
Pañña, (-°) (adj.) (the adj. form of paññā) of wisdom, endowed with knowledge or insight, posse...
Panna Vimutti
'deliverance through wisdom' (or understanding'), signifies, according to Com. to A.V, 142, the...
Suta Maya Panna
'knowledge based on learning'; s. paññā.
Bhavana Maya Panna
wisdom based on mental development'; s. paññā
Cinta Maya Panna
'Wisdom (or knowledge) based on thinking', s. paññā.
Pannarupa
Pannarūpa (पन्नरूप).—a. pale.Pannarūpa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms panna and...
Thiti Bhagiya Sila Samadhi Panna
'static morality, static concentration, static wisdom'; s. hāna-bhāgiya-sīla.
Sila Samadhi Panna
s. sikkhā, magga.
Maha Prajna Paramita Sutra
The Sutra was delivered by Shakyamuni in four places at sixteen assemblies. It consists of 600 ...
Bala
Bala (बल) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentio...
Bhavana
Bhavana.—(LL), a temple. Cf. pura, āyatana, ālaya, etc. Note: bhavana is defined in the “Indian...
Indriya
Indriya (इन्द्रिय, “senses”) refers to one of the twelve prameya (“objects of valid knowledge) ...

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