Pannaga, Panna-ga, Pannagā: 24 definitions

Introduction:

Pannaga means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Pannag.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Pannaga (पन्नग) is a Sanskrit word referring to a group of deities. Acording to the Nāṭyaśāstra 1.88-94, when Brahmā, Indra and all other gods went to inspect the playhouse (nāṭyamaṇḍapa) designed by Viśvakarmā, he assigned different deities for the protection of the playhouse itself, as well as for the objects relating to dramatic performance (prayoga).

As such, Brahmā assigned the Pannagas, the Guhyakas and the Yaḳṣas underneath the stage (raṅgapīṭha). The protection of the playhouse was enacted because of the jealous Vighnas (malevolent spirits), who began to create terror for the actors.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Pannaga (पन्नग).—A Śrutaṛṣi.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 33. 4.

2) Pannagā (पन्नगा).—Semi-divine beings, see sarpās.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 32. 1, 2.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Pannaga (पन्नग) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.35.13, I.60.66) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Pannaga) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Pannaga (पन्नग):—[pannagaḥ] Snakes.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Pannaga (पन्नग) refers to one of the thirty-six sacred trees, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “According to the Kula teaching (these) [i.e., Pannaga] are the most excellent Kula trees that give accomplishments and liberation. (They are full of) Yoginīs, Siddhas, Lords of the Heroes and hosts of gods and demons. One should not touch them with one’s feet or urinate and defecate on them or have sex etc. below them. One should not cut etc. or burn them. Having worshipped and praised them regularly with their own flowers and shoots, one should always worship the Śrīkrama with devotion with their best fruits and roots. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Pannaga (पन्नग) refers to “serpents”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 15) (“On the nakṣatras—‘asterisms’”), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “Those who are born on the lunar day of Puṣya will be dealers in barley, wheat, rice, sugar-canes and in the produce of the forest; will be either ministers or rulers; will live by water; will be Sādhus and will delight in sacrificial rites. Those who are born on the lunar day of Āśleṣā, will be dealers in perfumes, roots, fruits, reptiles, serpents (pannaga) and poison; will delight in cheating others of their property; will be dealers in pod grains and will be skilled in medicine of every sort. [...]”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Pannaga (पन्नग) is the name of a Garuḍa mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Pannaga).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Pannaga (पन्नग) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Pannaga] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Pannaga in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

pannaga : (m.) a serpent.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Pannaga refers to: a snake Th. 1, 429 (°inda chief of snake-demons); J. V, 166; Miln. 23.

Note: pannaga is a Pali compound consisting of the words panna and ga.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

pannaga (पन्नग).—m S (pat & naga. Going upon feet.) A snake.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

pannaga (पन्नग).—m A snake.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pannaga (पन्नग).—See under पद् (pad).

See also (synonyms): panna.

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Pannaga (पन्नग).—a snake, serpent; विप्रकृतः पन्नगः फणां कुरुते (viprakṛtaḥ pannagaḥ phaṇāṃ kurute) Ś.6.31.

-gam lead. °अरिः, °अशनः, °नाशनः (ariḥ, °aśanaḥ, °nāśanaḥ) epithets of Garuḍa.

Derivable forms: pannagaḥ (पन्नगः).

Pannaga is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms panna and ga (ग).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pannaga (पन्नग).—m.

(-gaḥ) 1. A snake. 2. A drug: see padmakāṣṭha. f. (-gī) The snake goddess Manasa. n.

(-gaṃ) Lead. E. panna a fallen, ga who goes, or pad a foot, na not, ga who goes,; moving without feet.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pannaga (पन्नग).—i. e. pad-na-ga, m. 1. A snake, [Nala] 14, 8. 2. A snakeshaped demon.

--- OR ---

Pānnaga (पान्नग).—i. e. pannaga + a, adj. Consisting of snakes, [Harivaṃśa, (ed. Calc.)] 9387.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pannaga (पन्नग).—[masculine] ī [feminine] serpent or serpent-demon (cf. [preceding]).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pannaga (पन्नग):—[=panna-ga] [from panna > pad] m. (ifc. f(ā). ) ‘creeping low’, a serpent or serpent-demon, [Suparṇādhyāya; Mahābhārata] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] Cerasus Puddum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) Pānnaga (पान्नग):—mf(ī)n. ([from] panna-ga) formed or consisting of snakes, having serpents, snaky, [Harivaṃśa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pannaga (पन्नग):—[panna-ga] (gaḥ) 1. m. A snake; a drug. f. () The snake goddess Manasā.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Pannagā (पन्नगा) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Paṇṇaī, Paṇṇaga, Pannayā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Pannaga in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Pannaga in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Pannaga (पन्नग) [Also spelled pannag]:—(nm) a snake; ~[gāri] lit. enemy of snakes —Garur, the divine eagle, vehicle of Vishnu.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Paṇṇaga (पण्णग) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Pannaga.

2) Paṇṇaga (पण्णग) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Pannaka.

3) Paṇṇāga (पण्णाग) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Prajña.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Pannaga (ಪನ್ನಗ):—

1) [noun] a snake or serpent.

2) [noun] (myth.) the descendents from Kadru, wife of sage Kaśyapa; the lineage of serpents.

3) [noun] (math.) a symbol for the number five.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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