Padya, Paḍyā, Pādya: 14 definitions

Introduction

Padya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Padya (पद्य).—Forming a part of a word or pada; cf. उपोत्तमं नानुदात्तं न पद्यम् (upottamaṃ nānudāttaṃ na padyam) R. Pr. I. 29; cf. also पूर्वपद्यः (pūrvapadyaḥ) R. Pr. I. 30. The word is used in this sense (पदावयव (padāvayava)) mostly in the Prātiśākhya works. The word is used in the sense of पादसंपन्न (pādasaṃpanna), made up of the feet (of verses), in the Rk Prātiśākhya in contrast with अक्षर्य (akṣarya), made up of syllables. In this sense the word is derived from the word पाद (pāda); cf. पद्याक्षर्ये स उत्थितः (padyākṣarye sa utthitaḥ) R. Pr, XVIII. 3.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Pādya (पाद्य) refers to “washing of the feet” and represents one of the sixteen upacāra, or “sixteen types of homage and services”, as described while explaining the mode of worshipping the phallic form (liṅga) of Śiva in the Śivapurāṇa 1.11. Accordingly, “[...] the devotee shall worship the mobile emblem with the sixteen types of homage and services (upacāra) as prescribed. It accords the region of Śiva gradually. The sixteen types of service are [for example, washing of the feet (pādya)] [...] Or he shall perform all the sixteen rites in the phallic emblem of human, saintly or godly origin, or in one naturally risen up (svayambhū) or in one of very extraordinary nature installed duly”.

Pādya (washing the feet) is mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa 1.20 while explaining the mode of worshipping an earthen phallic image (pārthiva-liṅga) according to the Vedic rites:—“[...] the water used for washing the feet (pādya) shall be offered with the mantra. ‘Namostu Nīlagrīvāya’ (obeisance to the blue-necked). The water for the respectful reception (arghya) shall be offered with the Rudragāyatrī mantra and the sipping water (ācamana) with the Tryambaka mantra”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Shodhganga: Temple management in the Āgamas

Pādya (पाद्य) refers to “water to wash one’s feet” and represents one of the various upacāras (offerings), in pūjā (ritual worship), as defined in the Śaivāgamas.—Pūjā consists of offering hospitality, in the form of water to wash the feet, to drink, water for ablutions, offering a bath, new clothes, fragrant unguents, fragrant flowers and ornaments, food and so on. Each step in the pūjā process is called “saṃskāra” and each offering is called “upacāra” [viz., Pādya].

Pādya represents a certain a ceremony to be performed during pūjā (ritualistic worship), according to the Arcanāvidhipaṭala of Kāmikāgama.—[After Aṅganyāsa and Amṛtīkaraṇa], the Ācārya then offers (with corresponding mantra) pādya, water to wash the feet of the Lord; ācamanīya, water to drink; arghya, water to wash oneself; and durvā grass, flowers and akṣata.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Arcana-dipika - 3rd Edition

Pādya (पाद्य) refers to “foot-bath” (water for foot bathing) and represents one of the various Bhoga (foodstuffs), according to the Arcana-dīpikā (manual on deity worship).—While ringing the bell and chanting the following mantras, offer the bhoga as indicated: Viz., etat pādyaṃ śrīṃ klīṃ rādhā-kṛṣṇābhyāṃ namaḥ—“offer water [from the pañca-pātra] into the throw-out pot [to signify the offering of footbath].”.

Pādya (“water for foot bathing”) refers to one of the various ingredients used during worship.—The ingredients used in pādya are dūrvā grass (a special type of sacred grass), śyāmā dhāna ( grain) and tulasī leaves. [Tulasī leaves should not be added if pādya is being offered to śrī guru, but one could use water in which fragrant flowers have been soaked or to which candana has been added.]

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: ACHC: Smarta Puja

Pādya (पाद्य) refers to “water for washing the feet”, representing one of the various services (upacāra) of a pūjā (ritualistic worship of a deity) which aim at the purification of the devotee.—At this stage of the pūjā the devotee pours water on the feet of the icon. The washing of the feet (pādya) is a ritual rather than physical purification to remove evil and elements of enmity.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

paḍyā (पड्या).—a (paḍaṇēṃ) Dull, drowsy, heavy, sluggish; an easy supine fellow that hates exertion. Used also of a beast. Pr. uḍyā puravatō paḍyā puravata nāhīṃ.

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padya (पद्य).—n (S) Metre. 2 A piece of metrical composition.

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padyā (पद्या).—m A tribe of Brahmans or an individual of it.

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pādya (पाद्य).—n (S) Water &c. for cleaning the feet. 2 Washing the feet. pādyācēṃ ghālaṇēṃ or karaṇēṃ fig. To kick and thump soundly.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

paḍyā (पड्या).—a Dull, drowsy, an easy, supine fellow that hates exertion. Pr. uḍyā puravatō, paḍyā puravata nāhīṃ.

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padya (पद्य).—n Metre. A piece of metrical com- position.

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padyā (पद्या).—m A tribe of Brahmans or an individual of it.

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pādya (पाद्य).—n Water &c. for cleaning the feet. pādyāñcē ghālaṇēṃ or karaṇēṃ Fig. To kick and thump soundly.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Padya (पद्य).—a.

1) Consisting of Padas or lines.

2) Measuring a pada.

3) Belonging to the foot; श्रीविष्णुपद्या मनुज- स्तुलस्याः श्वसन् शवो यस्तु न वेद गन्धम् (śrīviṣṇupadyā manuja- stulasyāḥ śvasan śavo yastu na veda gandham) Bhāg.2.3.23.

4) Marked with footsteps.

5) Belonging to a word.

6) Final.

-dyaḥ 1 A Sūdra.

2) A part of a word.

-dyā 1 A footpath, path, way.

2) Sugar.

-dyam 1 A stanza or verse (consisting of four lines); मदीयपद्यरत्नानां मञ्जूषैषा मया कृता (madīyapadyaratnānāṃ mañjūṣaiṣā mayā kṛtā) Bv.4.45; पद्यं चतुष्पदी तच्च वृत्तं जातिरिति द्विधा (padyaṃ catuṣpadī tacca vṛttaṃ jātiriti dvidhā) Chand. M.2.

2) Praise, panegyric (stuti).

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Pādya (पाद्य).—a. [pādārthaṃ pāda-yat] Belonging to the foot.

-dyam Water for washing the feet; पादयोः पाद्यं समर्पयामि (pādayoḥ pādyaṃ samarpayāmi).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Padya (पद्य).—(m. or nt.; Sanskrit only padyā f. in this meaning, Lex. and rarely lit., Schmidt, Nachträge; = Pali pajja), way, path: padyena kṛtena ātmanā Mahāvastu iii.395.11 (verse) = Pali Sn 514 pajjena katena attanā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Padya (पद्य).—mfn.

(-dyaḥ-dyā-dyaṃ) Hurting or coming in contact with the feet. n.

(-dyaṃ) 1. Metre, verse, a stanza. 2. Wickedness, infamy. m.

(-dyaḥ) 1. A Sudra. 2. A part of a word. f.

(-dyā) 1. A road. 2. Praise, eulogium. E. pad to go, yat aff.

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Pādya (पाद्य).—mfn.

(-dyaḥ-dyā-dyaṃ) Water, &c. for cleaning the feet. E. pāda the foot, yat aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Padya (पद्य).—i. e. pada + ya, n. A verse, Häberl. Anth. 529, 1.

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Pādya (पाद्य).—i. e. pād or pāda + ya, I. adj. Referring or belonging to the feet. Ii. n. Water for cleaning the feet, [Indralokāgamana] 3, 2.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Padya (पद्य) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—verses in praise of Kṛṣṇa, by Giridhara Dīkṣita. Hall. p. 152.
—by Raghunātha. Hall. p. 152.
—by Vallabhācārya. Hall. p. 146.

2) Padya (पद्य):—verses in praise of Kṛṣṇa, by Vallabhācārya.
—[commentary] by Haridāsa. Rgb. 727.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Padya (पद्य):—[from pad] mf(ā)n. ([from] 3. pad and pada) relating or belonging to a foot, [Ṛg-veda; Kāṭhaka]

2) [v.s. ...] hurting or coming in contact with the feet, [Pāṇini 4-4, 83; vi, 3, 53. [Scholiast or Commentator]]

3) [v.s. ...] marked with footsteps, [ib. iv, 4, 87 [Scholiast or Commentator]]

4) [v.s. ...] measuring a Pada in length or breadth, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra] (also in [compound] with numerals; cf. ardha-, daśa-)

5) [v.s. ...] consisting of Padas or parts of verses, [Brāhmaṇa; Āśvalāyana-gṛhya-sūtra; Ṛgveda-prātiśākhya]

6) [v.s. ...] consisting of one Pada, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra [Scholiast or Commentator]]

7) [v.s. ...] forming the end, final, [Atharvaveda-prātiśākhya]

8) [v.s. ...] m. a Śūdra, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. paj-ja)

9) [v.s. ...] a part of a word, verbal element, [Ṛgveda-prātiśākhya]

10) Padyā (पद्या):—[from padya > pad] f. footsteps, paces ([plural]), [Ṛg-veda]

11) [v.s. ...] a way, path, road, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] a foot as a measure of length, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra]

13) Padya (पद्य):—[from pad] n. a verse, metre, poetry (opp. to gadya, prose), [Vāmana’s Kāvyālaṃkāravṛtti; Kāvyādarśa; Sāhitya-darpaṇa etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] Name of sub voce hymns.

15) Pādya (पाद्य):—[from pād] mf(ā)n. relating or belonging to the foot, [Brāhmaṇa; ???] (n. with or sc. udaka, water used for washing the feet, [ib.] etc.)

16) [v.s. ...] amounting to a quarter of anything, [Śulba-sūtra]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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