Malavi, Mālavī: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Malavi means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Mālavī (मालवी) is another name (synonym) for Pāṭhā, which is a Sanskrit name for the plant Cissampelos pareira (velvetleaf). This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 6.119-121), which is an Ayurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Mālavī (मालवी).—The queen of Aśvapati king of Madra. She was the mother of Sāvitrī. Aśvapati begot of Mālavī a hundred sons called Mālavas.

Yama took to Kālapurī the soul of Satyavān who was shortlived. Sāvitrī, wife of Satyavān, followed Yama. Yama blessed Sāvitrī and said she would have many children and gave life to Satyavān again. Yama said "Satyavān will live for four hundred years and you will get a hundred sons of him. Your father Aśvapati also will get a hundred sons of Mālavī and the earth will get the name of Sāvitrī also". Accordingly Mālavī got a hundred sons and they were called Mālavas. (Chapter 297, Vana Parva).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mālavī (मालवी).—Same as Mālatī.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 213. 16.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: Holy Sites in Buddhist Saṃvara Cycle

Mālavī (मालवी) refers to one of the sixty-four inner channels running through the nirmāṇacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Nirmāṇacakra is an inner circle of the shape of a lotus with sixty-four petals. This inner circle is visualized in one’s abdomen. The inner channels [viz., Mālavī] run through the petals of these inner circles.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Mālavī.—dialect of Hindī prevalent in Mālava (Malwa). Note: mālavī is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

māḷavī (माळवी) [or माळवाई, māḷavāī].—a (mālava S) Relating to the country māḷavā or Malwa. It lies to the eastward of Gujarath.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mālavī (मालवी):—[from mālava] f. a princess of the M°, [Pāṇini 5-3, 114 [Scholiast or Commentator]]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of the wife of Aśva-pati and progenitress of the M°, [Mahābhārata]

3) [v.s. ...] (in music) a [particular] Rāgiṇī, [Saṃgīta-sārasaṃgraha] (printed bhālavī)

4) [v.s. ...] a kind of Prākṛt metre, [Colebrooke]

5) [v.s. ...] Clypea Hernandifolia, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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