Kicaka, aka: Kīcaka; 10 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kicaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Kichaka.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Kicaka in Purana glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Brother-in-law of Mātsya, king of virāṭa and son of Kekaya, king of the Sūtas.

To Kekaya, king of the Sūtas was born of queen Mālavī, Kīcaka and other 105 sons younger to him called Upa-Kīcakas. Their only sister was called Sudeṣṇā, (Bhārata, Southern text page 1898). Kīcaka and Upa-Kīcakas took their birth from an aspect of Bāṇa, the eldest of the Asuras known as the Kālakeyas. (See Bhārata, page 189). Mātsya, the Virāṭa king wedded Sudeṣṇā; and from that day onwards, the brothers too lived in the Virāṭa palace. Kīcaka was the chieftain of Virāṭa’s army, and he had, many a time, defeated in war king Suśarman of Trigarta.

Source: Google Books: Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Purāṇas

Kīcaka (कीचक).—Brother-in-law of Mātsya, king of Virāṭa and son of Kekaya, king of the Sūtas. General information. To Kekaya, king of the Sūtas was born of queen Mālavī, Kīcaka and other 105 sons younger to him called Upa-Kīcakas. Their only sister was called Sudeṣṇā, (Bhārata, Southern text, Page 1898). Kīcaka and Upa-Kīcakas took their birth from an aspect of Bāṇa, the eldest of the Asuras known as the Kālakeyas. (See Bhārata, Page 1893). Mātsya, the Virāṭa king wedded Sudeṣṇā; and from that day onwards, the brothers too lived in the Virāṭa palace. Kīcaka was the chieftain of Virāṭa’s army, and he had, many a time, defeated in war King Suśarman of Trigarta. (Virāṭa Parva, Chapter 25, Verse 30). (See full article at Story of Kīcaka from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Kīcaka (कीचक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.144.2) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kīcaka) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Kicaka was a prince of Kekeya, and the brother-in-law of the king of Virata. His sister Sushena was the wife of Virata. The King depended on his brother-in-law for protection, as Kicaka was an able military commander and a man of immense strength. According to a prophecy, he was to be killed by one of the other four men who were his equals in strength.

These men were:

  1. Bhima,
  2. Duryodhana,
  3. Jarasandha,
  4. Bakasura.

He was smitten with lust for Draupadi who was serving as a maid-in-waiting to his sister Sudeshna, under the assumed name of Sairandhiri. Despite her rebuffing his advances and warning him that she was already married to five Gandharvas of immense power, he attempted to outrage her modesty. In desperation she asked Bhima to find a way out of this problem.

According to Bhima's plan, she tricked Kicaka into meeting her late at night in a deserted hall. Kicaka went there with high hopes, but found Bhima waiting for him instead. A wrestling duel ensued, in which Kicaka was killed.

Source: Apam Napat: Indian Mythology

Kichaka (किचक): Sudeshna's brother, commander-in-chief of Virata's army, who made advances to Sairandhri (Draupadi). He was invited to meet her at night at the ladies dancing hall and was met instead by Valala (Bhima) dressed up as a female who killed him (Kichaka).

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Kīcaka (कीचक).—Brother-in-law of King Virāṭa. He was killed during the last year of the Pāṇḍavas exile in the kingdom of Virāṭa. When he lusted after Draupadī, he was killed by Bhīma.

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

India history and geogprahy

Kicaka, Venu or Vamsa is the name of a tree mentioned in the Kathasaritsagara by Somadeva (10th century A.D).—Kicaka refers to the “Bamboo-tree” and its woods in the Vindhya mountains and great and marvellous forests on the Hemakuta peak of the Himalaya mountain are mentioned.

Somadeva mentions many rich forests, gardens, various trees (eg., Kicaka), creepers medicinal and flowering plants and fruit-bearing trees in the Kathasaritsagara. Travel through the thick, high, impregnable and extensive Vindhya forest is a typical feature of many travel-stories. Somadeva’s writing more or less reflects the life of the people of Northern India during the 11th century. His Kathasaritsagara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Kicaka, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravahanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyadharas (celestial beings).

Source: Shodhganga: Cultural history as g leaned from kathasaritsagara
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

kīcaka (कीचक).—m S A large sort of bamboo.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kīcaka (कीचक).—[Uṇ.5.56]

1) A hollow bamboo.

2) A bamboo rattling or whistling in the wind; शब्दायन्ते मधुरमनिलैः कीचकाः पूर्यमाणाः (śabdāyante madhuramanilaiḥ kīcakāḥ pūryamāṇāḥ) Me.58; R.2.12;4.73; Ku.1. 8.

3) Name of a people.

4) Name of the commander-in-chief of king Virāṭa; कीचकानां वधः पर्व (kīcakānāṃ vadhaḥ parva) Mb.1.2.58. (While Draupdī in the guise of Sairandhrī was residing at the court of king Virāṭa with her five husbands also disguised, Kīchaka once happened to see her, and her beauty stirred up wicked passion in his heart. He, thenceforward, kept a sinister eye on her, and endeavoured through the help of his sister, the king's wife, to violate her chastity. Draupadī complained of his unmannerly conduct towards herself to the king; but when he declined to interfere, she sought the assistance of Bhīma, and at his suggestion showed herself favourable to his advances. It was then agreed that they should meet at mid-night in the dancing hall of the palace. Pursuant to appointment Kīchaka went there and attempted to embrace Draupadī (as he fancied Bhīma to be owing to the darkness of night). But the wretch was at once seized and crushed to death by the powerful Bhīma.]

Derivable forms: kīcakaḥ (कीचकः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 7 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kicakajit
Kīcakajit (कीचकजित्).—m. (-jit) A name of Bhima. E. kīcaka a goblin, and jit who conquers.
Venu
Veṇu (वेणु).—n. of one of the 4 devatās of the bodhivṛkṣa: LV 278.10.
Sudeshna
1) Sudeṣṇā (सुदेष्णा).—The wife of Virāṭa, the King of Matsya. General information. It is menti...
Vamsha
Vaṃśa (वंश).—m. (-śaḥ) 1. Race, lineage, family. 2. Assemblage, multitude. 3. A bamboo, (Bambus...
Kekaya
Kekaya (केकय).—m. (-yaḥ) A prince of the lunar race. f. (-yī) daughter of the preceding and one...
Stamba
Stamba (स्तम्ब).—m. (-mbaḥ) 1. A shrub, a plant that has no particular or decided stem. 2. A cl...
Upakicakas
Upakīcakas (उपकीचकस्).—Kīcaka, the brother-in-law of King Virāṭa, had one hundred and five brot...

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