Mahamuni, Mahāmuni, Maha-muni: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Mahamuni means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Mahamuni in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mahāmuni (महामुनि) refers to a “great sage” and is used to describe Nārada, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.20 (“The story of the submarine fire”).—Accordingly, after Brahmā spoke to the Ocean: “Thus requested by me, the ocean agreed. None else could have grasped Śiva’s fire of fury thus. That fire in the form of a mare entered the ocean and began to consume the currents of water. It blazed with all its shooting flames. O sage, then, delighted in mind I returned to my abode. The ocean of divine form bowed to me and vanished. O great sage [i.e., mahāmuni], the entire universe, freed from the fear of that fire became normal. The gods and the sages became happy”.

Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Mahāmuni (महामुनि) is the name of one of the seven sages (saptarṣi) in the Raivatamanvantara: one of the fourteen Manvantaras, according to the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, “In raivatamanvantara the name of Indra was Vibhu. The gods were divided into four groups like Vaikuṇṭha etc. The Saptarṣis were said to be Hiraṇyaromā, Viśvaśrī, Aindrabāhu, Urdhavabāhu, Subāhu, Parjanya and Mahāmuni who were born in the race of Priyavrata.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Mahāmuni (महामुनि) refers to a “great sage”, according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “When kings are overpowered by enemies with an army (or: by strong enemies), when cities are burnt down and the Kings’ army is driven away, when people in various districts do not have access to food [and other goods]—if the kingdom is thus oppressed by the enemies’ army, oh Great Sage (mahāmuni), and if in this inadequate situation the King’s enemies are unimpeded, he should have a sixteen-armed Sudarśana constructed [and properly installed, for his power is] without obstacles”.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A village in Ceylon, in the Dighavapi district. Sumana, father of Sumana, who was the wife of Lakuntaka Atimbara, lived there. DhA.iv.50.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahamuni in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mahāmuni : (m.) the great sage.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahāmuni (महामुनि).—

1) a great sage.

2) Name of Vyāsa.

3) an epithet of Buddha.

4) of Agastya.

5) the coriander plant.

-ni n.)

Derivable forms: mahāmuniḥ (महामुनिः).

Mahāmuni is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and muni (मुनि).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Mahāmuni (महामुनि).—name of a former Buddha: Mahāvastu iii.230.14.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāmuni (महामुनि).—m.

(-niḥ) 1. A name of Agastya. 2. A name of Baudd'ha or more properly, of any one of the sacred persons called by that name. 3. The epithet of a warlike saint, celebrated in the Mahabharata. 4. Time. 5. A name of Vyasa. n. (-ni) 1. Coriander. 2. Any medicinal drug. E. mahā great, and muni saint.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāmuni (महामुनि).—I. m. 1. a great Muni, Chr. 15, 29; [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 49, 50 (epithet of Agastya.) 2. the saint Agastya. 3. epithet of Paraśurāma, Chr. 19, 12, and of Vyāsa. 4. time. Ii. n. Coriander.

Mahāmuni is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and muni (मुनि).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāmuni (महामुनि).—[masculine] great sage.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mahāmuni (महामुनि):—[=mahā-muni] [from mahā > mah] m. a gr° Muni or sage, ([especially]) Name of a Buddha or Jina, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa; Bhāgavata-purāṇa] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] Zanthoxylon Hastile, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of Vyāsa, [Horace H. Wilson]

4) [v.s. ...] of Agastya, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] of a Ṛṣi in the 5th Manv-antara, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

6) [v.s. ...] n. the seed of Zanthoxylon Hastile, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] Elaeocarpus Ganitrus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] any medicinal herb, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāmuni (महामुनि):—[mahā-muni] (niḥ) 2. m. Agastya; Buddha; Vyāsa; time. n. Coriander.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mahamuni in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mahāmuni (ಮಹಾಮುನಿ):—

1) [noun] a great sage.

2) [noun] Buddha, the founder of Buddhism.

3) [noun] Agastya, a celebrated sage.

4) [noun] the plant Coriandrum satium of Apiaceae family; coriander plant.

5) [noun] the strong-smelling, seedlike fruit of this plant widely used in flavouring food; coriander.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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