Raivata; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Raivata means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

[Raivata in Purana glossaries]

Raivata (रैवत):—One of the Eleven Rudras (ekādaśa-rudra), according to the Agni-purāṇa. The Agni Purāṇa is a religious text containing details on Viṣṇu’s different incarnations (avatar), but also deals with various cultural subjects such as Cosmology, Grammar and Astrology.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Agni Purāṇa

Raivata (रैवत) is another name for Vidyullata, one of the seven major mountains in Krauñcadvīpa, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 88. All of these mountains are tall and filled with gems. Krauñcadvīpa is one of the seven islands (dvīpa), ruled over by Jyotiṣmān, one of the ten sons of Priyavrata, son of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

1a) Raivata (रैवत).—A Rudra and a son of Bhūta and Sarūpā.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa VI. 6. 17; Matsya-purāṇa 5. 29; VI. I. 15. 122.

1b) A son of Reva (known also as Kakudmin); king of Ānarttas; had a daughter Revatī (s.v.) whom he took to Brahmā to consult him as to a suitable bridegroom. The music of Hāha and Hūhu was going on, and when it was finished, there was a different kalpa in the earth; was advised to give her to Balarāma, and so he did.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 52. 15 [1-11]; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 61. 20; Matsya-purāṇa 12. 23; Vāyu-purāṇa 86. 25.

1c) The fifth Manu; during his epoch were Devabāhu and six other sages, Gods named Ābhūtarajasas.1 Vibhu was Indra; Amitābha and other three gaṇas of gods each 14 in number; Hiraṇyaroma and other six formed the saptaṛṣis; Balabandhu and others were his sons; of the Priyavrata line.2

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 9. 19-22; Vāyu-purāṇa 62. 3.
  • 2) Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 1. 6, 20-4.

1d) A class of reptiles, as arrows of Tripurāri.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 133. 25.

1e) A king and father-in-law of Baladeva.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 25. 19.

1f) A Prasūta god.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 62. 60.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

[Raivata in Itihasa glossaries]

Raivata (रैवत) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. XIII.116.67, XIII.115) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Raivata) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

(Source): JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
context information

Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[Raivata in Jainism glossaries]

Raivata (रैवत) is the name of a gandharva god according to the Śvetāmbara tradition, while the Digambara does not recognize this. The gandharvas refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The gandharvas have a golden appearance according to the Digambaras and the Tumbaru tree is their caitya-vṛkṣa (sacred-tree). They have a blackish complexion and are beautiful in appearance, have excellent physiognomy, sweet voices and are adorned with crowns and neckalces according to the Śvetāmbaras.

The deities such as Raivata are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Jainism
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Raivata in Sanskrit glossaries]

Raivata (रैवत).—a. (- f.)

1) Rich, wealthy.

2) Plentiful, abundant.

3) Splendid, beautiful.

-taḥ 1 Name of Śiva.

2) Saturn.

3) Name of a mountain.

4) A cloud.

5) Name of the 5th Manu; Ms.1.62.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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