Karkati, Karkaṭi, Karkaṭī: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Karkati means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Karkaṭi (कर्कटि).—See para 12 under Brahmā.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Karkaṭī (कर्कटी) is another name for Jīmūtaka, a medicinal plant identified with Luffa echinata (bitter sponge gourd or bitter luffa) from the Cucurbitaceae or “gourd family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.58-60 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Karkaṭī and Jīmūtaka, there are a total of nineteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Karkaṭī (कर्कटी) refers to the “cucumber” and is mentioned in a list of remedies for indigestion in the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—A complete section in Bhojanakutūhala is devoted for the description of agents that cause indigestion [viz., godhūma (wheat)]. These agents consumed on a large scale can cause indigestion for certain people. The remedies [viz., karkaṭī (cucumber)] for these types of indigestions are also explained therewith.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Karkaṭī (कर्कटी) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Karkaṭa forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Jalacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the jalacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the saṃbhoga-puṭa (‘enjoyment layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Karkaṭī] and Vīras are white in color; the shapes of their faces are in accordance with their names; they have four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife..

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Karkaṭi (कर्कटि) or Karkaṭī (कर्कटी).—f. A sort of cucumber.

Derivable forms: karkaṭiḥ (कर्कटिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Karkaṭi (कर्कटि).—f.

(-ṭiḥ) A sort of cucumber, (Cucumis utilatissimus:) see karkaṭa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Karkaṭī (कर्कटी):—[from karkaṭa > karka] f. a female crab, [Mahābhārata]

2) [v.s. ...] Cucumis Utilissimus, a kind of cucumber [commentator or commentary] on [Tāṇḍya-brāhmaṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] a small water-jar, [Pañcatantra]

4) [v.s. ...] the fruit of Bombax Heptaphyllum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of a Rākṣasī

6) [v.s. ...] (cf. [Greek] καρκίνος; [Latin] cancer.)

7) Karkaṭi (कर्कटि):—[from karka] f. Cucumis Utilissimus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Karkaṭi (कर्कटि):—(ṭiḥ) 2. f. A sort of cucumber.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Karkaṭi (कर्कटि):—f. Cucumis utilissimus Roxb. [Śabdaratnāvalī im Śabdakalpadruma] — Vgl. karkaṭī unter karkaṭa .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Karkaṭi (कर्कटि):—f. Cucumis utilissimus.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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